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•<;j QUARTER SESSIONS.;

"TRYING TO STOP A CANNON BALL."

A FERNDALE FAILURE.

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I RAGBIT COURSING AT ! I CAERPHILLY.i

IBROX DISASTER,

! MONEY-LENDER, PEER, AND…

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MONEY-LENDER, PEER, AND SOLICITOR. Mr Justice Ridley beard on Friday an action brought by Messrs B. and P. Samuel, money- lenders, against the Earl of Euston, as the acceptor, and Mr Arthur J. E. Newton, as the drawer, of a bill of exchange for £3,000, which had been dishonoured. Lord Euston denied that he accepted the bill, and said that if he accepted it it was an accommodation bill. He further pleaded that the acceptance, if any, was procured from him by fraud. Mr Pickford, K.C., for the plaintiffs, said that although the acceptance of the bill had been formally denied, it was now admitted in one of the interrogatories. He would put the interrogatory in, and then the onus of proof would rest upon the defendant, the Earl of Euston. This course having been followed. Mr Walton, for Lord Euston, said that the bill in question was one for £3,000, and was security for advances made by the plaintiffs to Mr Newton. Motives of simple friendliness led his Lordship to accept the bill. The bill was the last of a series which Newton used for loans raised entirely for himself. And Lord Euston was now alleged by various money-lenders to be liable for nearly £15,000 on bills which he had backed for Newton while the latter was acting as the Earl's solicitor. The plaintiffs had obtained judgment against Mr Newton, who, however, was not able to meet his liabilities. Thus the plaintiffs sought to make the Earl responsible. Lord Euston, who went into the witneps-box, said he was 54 years old, and was the eldfest son of the Duke of Grafton. When Newton approached him at the end of 1899 seeking his I help, the solicitor said he hoped to get JE.10,000 from his father.—Mr Justice Ridley Ah, many a man has said that before. (Laughter.)—In ¡ persuading the witness to back his bills, Newton said he would run no risks, as even if he died be I was insured for over £30,000. On the conclusion of Lord Euston's evidence, Mr Justice Ridley remarked "I think there is fraudulent repre- i sentation." Mr Newton then went into the box and gave his version of his transaction with Lord Euston. He sail he had committed no fraud on Lord Euston, because he had told him of the policies, and of the large income,he was making. And Lord Euston does not say there was fraud either," he added. He pointed out that Lord Euston had not, up till now, been called upon for a farthing,—The Judge Having heard Mr Newton's evidence I don't think there is fraud.— Mr Newton I thank you, your Lordship.—His Lordship gave judgment for the plaintiffs, and declined to grant a stay of execution. -A

THE RIBBLE~D0CKS.

I"LOST HIS HEAD AND TOOK*…

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I Officer's Divorce Suit.II…

"----..------------WEST AFRICAN…

.Lv---T...,. --MILL ACCIDENT,

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LEGAL ADVICE.

EFFECT OF THE T.V.R. STRiKE.I

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MUSIC IN WALES.

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