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1MP0RTA8T MElTING OF THE GENERAL…

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1MP0RTA8T MElTING OF THE GENERAL COJIJIITTEE. -r.- A CONSERVATIVE CANDIDATE I CHOSEN. UNANIMOUS SELECTION OF MR. ARTHUR E. GUEST. SPEECHES BY 31R. T. W. BOOKER, MR, JONAS WAToON, DR. PAINE, CAPTAIN JENNER, MR. COEBSTI, DR. C. T. YACHELL, MIL B. E. SPENCER, CAPT. CAPPEB, AKD OTHERS. Accost itfluet'inl and unanimous meeting of the general comnJiLee of the Conservative Asso- siation for the uÜ.ed boroughs of Cardiff, Cow bridge, and Llautrisant was held on Thursday evenirg at the Piiiihsrmonic Assembly Room, St. Mary street, Cardiff. The committee numbers 200 members, of whom nearly 100 were present, and ttat cninber would have been largely in. sreftEca but for the fact of the volunteer inspec- tion, which prevented a considerable section of the Cardiff members attending, to which must be added the excusable absence of the bulk of the 50 members who represent Cow bridge and Llan. trieant. Mr. T. W. Booker, one of the vice-presidents of the association, occupied the chair, and there Were also present-Mesars. John Stuart Corbeit, B. Forrest, R. F. Lascelles Jenner, Jonas Watson (hon. sec.), Dr. H. J. Paine, R. E. Spencer, J. A. Cortett, Montague Grover, Rev. M. P. Williams (head master Cowbridge Grammar School), Dr. C. T. Yachell, Morgan Morgan (solicitor), E. B. Beece (coroner), Franklen G. Evans, E. H. Capper, Peter Davies, Councillor Lougher, E. Jenkins, W. H. E. Godfrey, Lascelles Carr, J. C. Treharne, Councillor Daniel Lewis, G. Parfitt, J. J. S. Burt. Councillor W. J. Trounce, W. J. M'Auliffe (Western Mail), E. Grogan, R. E. Dawson, E. W. Penn, Thomas Hooper, W. Allen (pilot), E. Jenks, J. Stibba, W. Spiricion, J. Cook, Joseph Webb, Samuel Marks, 'Peter Whyte, W. Richards (pilot), J. W. Pipe, F. W. Armstrong, T. C. Glass, W. Holder, F. W. Hybart, E. P. Lee, Thomas Jenkins, W. T. Wheeler, Henry Thomas, William Davie3 (Bororgh Arms), John Laughland, W. Howell, W. Hammond, Sydney Coleman, E. J. Coleman, E. Griffiths, C. Pride, James teloman, H. North, George Coles, H. J. Thatcher, G. Strong1, E. Baugh, James Evans, T. Reynolds (Caerphilly), C. J. Jackeon, B, Vrain, J. Parker, J. L. Williams, S. Shepton, W. Luke Evans, William Allen, W. C. Peace, E. J. Thomas (registration agent), &3. The object of the meeting was to choose the candidate whom the association shall. support at the next election," which fact acoounts for the Very great interest taken in the proceedings. The CHAIRMAN having called on the secretary to state the business formalities which had to be gone through before they discussed the prin. cipal question of the evening, Mr. JONAS WATSON (hon. secretary) said that this was about the time at which the annual I Meeting of the association was held, and in order to avoid summoning the General Committee more frequently than was absolutely neccssary, it had been suggested that the officers ahould be elected at that meeting. The Motion he had first to propose was, that the President (Lord Tredegar), the vice-presidents (the Marquess of Bute, Lord Windsor, Lord Jersey, Colonel Morgan, and Mr T. W. Booker), the secretary (Mr. Jonas Watson), and the treasurer (Mr. J. Emercon Williams) be re-elected for the current year. He had wished to have made an exception in the case of the secretary (cries of No, no "), but aa Abe Lincoln once said, it was not wise to awop horses when crossing a stream, and for that reason he was willing to retain offioe. (Applause.) He might mention that ha had received letters from their president and from Colonel Morgan expressing regret at their inability to attetd, and that Colonel Hill, and Several of the officers of the ar- tillery volunteers, whose inspection took place that day, had intended looking in daring the meeting in uniform, as they had no time tc go home and change their clolihes-(ap- plause)—but had been informed that if they did EO they would be acting contrary to the regula- tions. Mr. PETER DAVIES seconded the motion, which Was carried nem. dis. Mr. JONAS WATSON then proposed that the 20 Etipernrmerary members of the executive com- mittee be re-elected, and that the executive com- !tùttee be authorised to fill up any vacancies that Jnay occur on the general committee during the current year. Mr. CAPPER seconded the proposition, which 1tas adopted. Mr. CAPPER proposed a vote of thanks to the Preeident. vice.preBidents, treasurer, and seore. tary, for the valuable services they had rendered to the association during the past year. (Ap. fclause.) The vote of thanks was accorded with acclama- tieD, and waa responded to by tho chairman and Secretary. The CHAIRMAN I will now ask our secretary to place before ycu the vote which has boen arrived at by the executive committee, and which ia to be submitted to you for your consideration and dis. cussion. Mr. JONAS WATSON Baid that perhapa the chairman wculd allow him, before entering upon the other business, to remind them of what was done at the last meeting of the executive com- mittee, and to give Sir Ivor Guest's reply, ror tLia was the first opportunity he had bad of doing eo. At that meeting they tr animcua in resolving that a deputation should wait upon Sir IvorvGuest to ask him to the representation of the boroughs in the Cocservstive interest. But from a correspondence tfcey had with Sir Ivor Guest, they found, much v to their regret, that he cculd not: entertain the Citation, and tht therefore, it would have baen useless for a deputation to have waited upon him. 11:8 (Mr Watson) exerted all the influence in his to induce Sir Ivor Guest to change his 1 mind, and was gupported by the efbrts of people Ul k-gh places, but they fuiled. He suppose Su hor G nest bad had a previous invitation, and that his refusal was not due to any want of good wIll Awards the Cardiff boroughs. (AilpbuiJe.) l'hia was the first opportunity they ltad Lad of communicating this result to the generel committee, and he might add tbat the executive committee did not wish to Summon them together until there was something definite to lay before them. Of course it was a difficult thing to obtain a candidate it wa3 like Wooing a lady. (Laughter) A suitor did not like to say to a laciy, Will you accept if I ask )011." He had to afck her firsthand then she would ie her answer- (laughter)—and it was just so With a candidate. (Applause.) The name of one hereon at least ha.d been brought bafore the executive committee, and they had boon unil.i. 1:1101111 in recommending, or in nominating, that !>erBon to the general commttoo-it was simply a tlOlIlbation, and not a dictation at all, but ho Cllld tell them that if that person were selected J a tiunimous vote, he would consent to coateat ^etcconghs. (Applause.) Ho did not refer to Sir Guest, but to the nearest person to him-his rotle:, Mr. Arthur E. Guest—(cheer?)—a psntle- who had served his apprenticeship in Parlia_ ?.iid was therefore not untried. (Applause). *• Aithur Guest was well known in Parliament,. ::d very strorgly recommended by those who d known him in Parliament. (Applause.) A great h cf the correspondence which had taken place ad been cf a confidential nature, but it was to know that Mr. Arthur Guest had, in a tc the executive committee, authorised the ateai(nt that, were he chosen by the Conserva eve Association, to would be willing to be the Ofiservative candidate for the united boroughs. &pplauee.) He thought he should at this lfit lay before the general committee the resolu- ( gCn Passed by the executive oommittea last A Brd&y; it was to the effect that the vice- « Qt (Mr. Booker) ask Mr. Arthur Guest to I i. himself tQ noniinated as the Conserva- | candidate for the Cardiff boroughs. Tha C5 had received was the same in ice. as that h (Mr. Watson) had received him. i f df. It was dated the f, tl. of August, and ran as fellows:— IN rcpij to ;OVT letter cf yesterday's date. and copy cfres Jur o)jS thereiD co-.tain-ti, I have to s-y thnt I tmi.ighlj ll-iitared the executive t'j be iio» Ji.ated to tbo ffenertil committee as oris riftivf? candklate the boroughs of Uardilf, lid bhsiU bo gliidto accept tti- s-ma. Eo, as fecietsry of the association, was, there- twe, authorised by the executive committee to propose to them the naice of Mr. Arthur Guest, as {he candidate this apcoci-ttion ahull support at the forthciOtf-iKg election. (Loud appbeae.) It was ceceesary, of course, to know if thid decision on the part of tile executive committee was in ftccordance with the hlírgs of Conservatives in general. lh:a waa a point on which Mr. Arthur Guest was ECioetyhat arxiocs. He told Mr. Arthur Guest that tb1 association was the representative of the Conservative party in the town, and that the Ccnseivat;vo paity were, he believed, ready to back them up There was no clique, inside or outside, aEd hocia rot know a single Conservative who was opposed to the association as euch. (Cheere.) 1 he executive committee took it to be their cuty to communicate with the president and vice-presidents with regard to the selection. Lord Tiedegar wiote "I have every reason to believe that he (Mr. Arthur Guest) will accept the invita- tation, and I think he will be a very good candi- date." Their president, therefore, agreed with them, and their vice-president agreed with them too. (Applause.) He did not like to ccmmuiiic&te with peers on the subject. They were precluded by their position frcm taking a very active part in such business as they might wish to do. But not one dissented from the choice, and as to Colonel Morgan, he said. in a letter they had received I cancaly say that the suliect before the meeting to- morrow tveiiiug Ù:8HV¡;¡¡ the attention of all true COil, sens tivea. I do not thi'ik the association could do bttUr tlum tccept the candidature of Mr. Arthur Ga, st. If the ronserv tives of Cardiff wish at tb., e.'eotk ii to ba reprpseuttd, they ought at oace to have a cai did te on the field, aud not to throw a s1rgle chance (Applause,) Mr. Fcrreat was present, and would etdoree what he (the speaker) had said with regard to Lord Windsor's sympathy with them in tie choice they had made. He had received a letter from his lordship, in which he remarked, "I thoroughly approve of the candida- ture of Mr. Arthur Guest." (Applause.) He had bad a great deal of correspondonce on the subjaot with the authorities of the Conservative party at Loi.don, tvho Vicre tetter able to judge as to the candidate who would be most useful to them than ary individual, and they strongly recommended the claims of Mr. Arthur Gueat. (Cheers.) He might add that those who had the control of Con. Eervativo action in the House had also written to him strongly in Mr. Arthur Guest's favour, and it appeared to him that if they were only united, and encouraged him m his candidature, they would have a better chance of being represented in Parliament than ever they had had before. (Loud cheers.) It was, perhaps, necessary to explain that, though the executive committee made .that nomination, any member present could nominate anyone else; but he thought they should ba united—in fact, it would be utteily useless for them to go into a contest unless united; but if united he had little doubt of the result of the next election- (Leud cheers.) Dr. PAINE said he had been requested to state that Mr. Charles Williams had been prevented frcm attending the meeting he had fully intended beirg present. 1 he CHAIRMAN The reoommendation of the executive committee is before yon, and as the secretary has explained it is only a recommenda. tien; if any gentleman wishes to nominate anybody eleo, it is competent for him to do so. In reply to a question, Mr. J. WATSON said be had received a letter from Major Sloper, regret- ting that his engagement at drill would prevent his being present. Dr. PAIE proposed that the recommendation of the executive committee be adopted by that meeting. He said that at the last meeting, held for the special purpose of nominating a candidate several names were mentioned, and they wer unanimous in recommending Sir Ivor Quest. Circumstances had arisen that rendered it impos- sible for him to accept the invitation. There was another constituency that he felt had a claim on him, and he was expeoted to again contest that seat. They conld not, he (the speaker) was satisfied, have a name that would more Btrongly recommend itself to the consideration of the Con. eervative electors of Cardiff than that name which had been a household word during the time that many of them had been residents in that locality. He need haxdiy say that he referred to the name of Guest. (Cheers.) Associated as it had been with their great commercial interests, it was a name which must commend itself, in that for an important port like Cardiff it was desirable that they should have a candidate to represent the Conservative interests who was thoroughly acquainted with commercial matters. From time to time measures of a very important nature as affectirg the commercial interests of a shipping port must crop up before Parliament, and it was, therefore, necessary that one intimately acquainted with the commercial interests of that port thould be in his place to watch their nterests. He was satisfied that not simply politically, but commercially, they cculd not have a better man than Mr. Arthur Guest. The secretary had told them that he was not an untried man-he had been in Parliament, and had acquitted himself to the satisfaction of the Conservative party. If they accepted the resolution of the executive committee they would have every reason to believe and to hope that they would carry him triumph- antly in the coming contest. (Applause.) There. fore he begged leave to submit to them the recom- mendation of the executive committee that Mr. Arthur Guest be invited to contest the represen- tation of. Cardiff in the Conservative interest at the next genetal election." (Loud applause.) Mr. LAUGHLAND asked what constituency Mr. Arthur Guest represented before? LASCELLES CARR: Poole, from 18GB to 1874. Mr. JEKKS beggsd to second the resolution that had been proposed. It was not necessary for him to say anything in support of Mr. Arthur Gueat —his name was like a household word, and he had a great interest in this borough. (Applause.) Mr. CORBETT supported the proposition. He eaid they probably all knew that Mr. Arthur Gtest was a native of this county, and had resided in it. Latterly his business engagements —and he was a thorough business man—had com- pelled him to reeide in London, but he was thoroughly acquainted with this county, where his family had made their fortune, and where they had done a great deal to make the fortunes of other people. (Ottcrf.) Their friends on the other sit'e were very fond of pointing to what h. Kecd had promieec to do for rambrokethice, and what he had for the Russian Govern, meat. They (the Conservatives) came a little nearer home, and pointed to what the Gueat family had done for this ooucty. (Applause.) They were, undoubtedly, the leaders of the great iron manufacturers, and were almost the only people who in these troublous and unfortunate times had kept their works in full swing. (Applause.) He believod that they wen anead of all their rivals in the business. They were tha first to introduce new methods of manufacture* ^d they were consistent in always employing a erge number of workmen (Cheera.) The importance of their support to this town was contidcrablo, and the amount of traie ey rought to it waa v&ry great. (Ap- rbt1!:e.) e thought Mr. Arthur Guest had far etrcrger claims on the suffrages of the people of Cardiff than had a perfect stranger like Mr. Reed, whcm, per8Ps, if they knew him better they would like him less. (Laughter and applause). Dr- Evan* *lao supported the motion. H0 6a^ the reason had not been stated why Sir Ivor Guest declined their invitation to contest the boroughs, and manypersoDB mights be aware of It. It was expeoted that a third seat would be grf-nted to Bu&LO., and in consequence a deputation was appointed to Wait upcm Sir hor to ask hun to again Conservative candle for the city. Th deputation tLuskad him for past services, made a handsome preset to Cornelia, and cxptCFsrd the hope that he would contest the seat. In reply he promise! to do so and that wa, the reason he was not brought forward as their candidate on the preeent occasion. Mi. Cortett Lad referred to the industries: connected v. ita the name of Guest-the Dowlas Works and so forth-and all 4 he (the speaker) could say was that if Mr. Arthur Guest's steel could not be used against his opponent, still he would stea a march upon him, and go in triumphantly a.t the had of the poll. (Laughter, appbuse, and crlas of "01:, ch.") r. CAPPER said that before the resolution was nt he would like to state that thay had had a little meeting at the Docks—he did not want them to run away with the idea that there were no good Conservatives doisn there—and on b¡,hnlf of hia brother shipowners and ship brokers in the town, he believed he Iliight eay that two-thirds of thsm wculd work in support of Sir Ivor Guest. He need hardly say to those present who had had dealings with the Dowlais Iron Company, or with Messrs. Gueat, how pleasant it was to transact business with them in any way they kept r ) word, and id sot want charter parties, or any- < ihirg else. (Laughter, and a voice: "That is true.") He hoped that when they came to the poll with Mr. Arthur Guest ae a candidate, thsao I thu gs would not be forgotten. If they worked as they ought to do they would have no difficulty in returning Mr. Arthur Guest, and, as he had bttd, the shipowners ana ehipbrokera Lhorougiily supported his candidature. (Applause ) Mr. JENNER endorsed what had already been eaid, and would be glad to support Mr. Arthur Guest, who he had no doubt would make a very good candidate. (Applause). Mr. fc PENCER did not anticipate being called upon to speak, but endorsed the statements of previous speakers. In Mr. Arthur Guest they had in one ser,S6 a local man. He waa intimately connected with the commercial interests of the county and borough, and they knew ho was a man of great business capacity, that he had been chairman of an important railway company, and that ho had had past experience in the House of Commons. (Applause.) He had also been the representative of a seaport town, and there were other circumstances that recom- mended hia candidature most strongly to a borough like Cardiff. The success of his candidature did not depend upon the length or number of their speeches; the very name of Guest in the oounty of Glamorgan, and partiou. larly in the borough of Cardiff, recommended itself and they would be serving the best interests of the Conservative party if they put forth their best efforts in trying to return him as their member. (Applause.) Rev. M. P. WILLIAMS (Cowbridge) said be was a comparative stranger; but he had heard a good deal of the. Guest family, and he firmly believed that they had in Mr. Arthur Guest a most acceptable candidate, and one who, most likely would be returned. He sincerely hoped that it would be so. (Applause.) < Dr. VACHELL rose, as a convert to the ranks of Conservatism, to support the motion. (Applause.) 1 His family had been opposed to Conservative principles, but there was no reason why they j should always follow the leader, and he had very ] groat pleasure in coming amongst them, and in 1 giving his support, whatever it was worth, to 1 the gentleman they had nominated. (Applause.) The resolution was then submitted to the meet- < irg and carried unanimously, with loud applause. ] Mr. JONAS WATSON said they came there to receive any name that might be suggested, and for that purpose they brought with them a number of voting papers. Those papers were not now necessary, and he was glad that they had been unanimous, as unanimity was important in the struggle in which they were about to engage. He said a short time ago that it would be dangerous to change horses in crossing the river—they had now crossed the Rubicon, and in order to fight the forthcoming contest they would have to arm themselves with more than Conservative feeling; they must have Conservative enthusiasm. They bad to aek every gentleman present to look upon himself as a volunteer in the work, and to canvass his neigbours, and elicit their support. They had a system prepared for canvassing streets in the united boroughs, and what they wanted was a few volunteers who would conduct the canvass, and tell them what was the condition of the register. He hoped they would all assist Mr. Thomas in correcting any descriptions that were wrong, and in filling in any omissions on the list of voters, and it should be remembered that all this must be done before the 25th of August, which was the last day for receiving claims and objections. Any information on the sub ject would be given by ltlr; E. J. Thomas. They really must have a little more fire than they had had hitherto; there had been a great deal of latent Conservatism, and it must be latent no longer, for they were going to win this time. (Applause.) It was a saying on the other side that taxation ahould be the basis of repre- sentation, and the Conservatives had all the landed proprietors on their side they had also the policy of the Government on their tide, a policy which had been confirmed by the eoursejof events, and would be further confirmed as events went on. (Applause.) If they could not carry their candidate now, with that united feeling, he did not know when they oould do so but they must not rely on that—they must work. As to the rival candidate, no doubt he was an excellent man for those who wanted models; but they did not want models—they did not want to build ships—they wanted to make them pay. (Laughter.) As for his qualifications to sit as the representative of Cardiff he (the speaker) could not discover what they were. They had a man whose named figured in the division list, and who had been a regular atten. dant at the House. That was what they wanted, for even if he did not speak, he would vote the right way, and would support the Government that had raised England to its present position. Commenting on the unanimity of the vote that had been given, Mr. Watson aaid he noticed the list of persons present at the meeting held on the other eide did not contain the name of a single gentle- man who could be regarded as a leader of the party. This, he said, looked suspicious. In con* elusion, he said he had prepared a requisition to Mr. Arthur Guest, which he hopeti they would all sign, expressing the hope that he would come for- ward as their candidate, and promising to give hiin their support. (Applause.) The requisition was signed by the whole of the gentlemen present and the proceedinga were then brought to a conclusion.

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