Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

39 articles on this Page

ANOTHER CARDIFF PILOT CARRIED…

. ABRrVAL OF REINFORCEMENTS…

COURT OF INQUIRY ON THE ISANDULA…

THE KILLED AT IS KNDULA. -

ATTITUDE OF THE NATIVES. -

ARMS FOR CETYWAYO. -

THE ALLEGED SHIPMENT OF ARMS…

COLONEL PULLEINE AT ISANDULA,…

THE RECOVERY OF THE COLOURS.…

LOCAL MEN AMONG THE KILLED…

| PREPARATIONS FOR THE I RELIEF…

DEAN STANLEY AT WOOLWICH.…

A NARROW ESCAPE.

LETTER FROM A WELSH SOLDIER.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. -

- THE ROYAL MARRIAGE TREATY.'

[No title]

- AN INFAMOUS PHASE OF LONDON…

REPORT OF THE LORDS' COMMITTEE…

FARM HOUSE MORALITY IN MONMOUTHSHIRE.…

NARROW /ESCAPE OF A CARDIFF…

ROBBERY OF TIMBER AT DINAS…

[No title]

SERIOUS CHARGES AGAINST A…

DISTRESSING ACCIDENT AT DOWLAIS.

LAUNCH OF A GUION STEAMER.

[No title]

IIMPORTANT CASE UNDER THE…

ROYAL NATIONAL LIFEBOAT INSTITUTION.…

THE LEASING OF CWMAVON WORKS.

[No title]

THE SOUTH WALES FOOTBALLS'…

News
Cite
Share

THE SOUTH WALES FOOTBALLS CHALLENGE CUP. PLAYING OFF THE FINAL TIE. £ ANOTHER GREAT VICTORY FOR NEWPORT. As anticipated by us, the match between New- port and Cardiff was not the final tie in this com- petition. The former club had played off its quota of matches, and were entitled to retain the cup for a second year, though they had previously reserved to themselves the right of playing again in the event of defeating Cardiff. They did defeat Cardiff, as everybody knows, and with their characteristic magnanimity and love of fair play, they forthwith invited the Neath and Swan- sea clubs to enter the arena again, and offered to play off the final tie with the winner on Saturday last. The invitation was accepted, and for a seventh time the Neath and Swansea clubs met to solve the apparently difficult problem of superiority. The problem was solved, Neath gaining the victory a severe and well-played game, although no goal was made by either side. Accordingly a meeting took place on Saturday between the Newport and Neath clubs, and the concluding match in the competition was decided, the result being another great victory for the Monmouth. shire team, as was generally predioted. The game was played at Newport, and created considerable excitement among the towns folk, who seemed to be prond of their ever victorious club, and jealous of the distinction it has attained. After the success of the preceding Saturday, the Newport men found on returning home that they weie regarded as veritable heroes, and the enthusiasm which then prevailed did not at once subside. When the match was announced it became the chief subject on the tapis of Newport gossip, and the dire defeat in store for Neath was often pictured and discussed. No one appeared to doubt the result; all had tohe most pro- found faith ijin their local "champions," and in betting circles five to one was offered in their favour, and never accepted. The weather was not so bright and genial as on the preceding Saturday; the opaque .clouds that hung overhead threatened rain, and the wind blew oold, but the ground was in fair condition, and nothing oc- curred to mar the success and pleasure of the contest. The field, which belongs to the New- port Club, is enclosed, and contains, in addition to other accommodation, a grand stand, and com- mittee rooms. It is admirably adapted to the purposes to which it is devoted, and, in fact, stands second to none in the district, its only disadvantage being, a rugged hill which rise in the rear, and gives the public a tempting opportunity of gaining a bird's eye view of the proceedings gratis. This disadvan- tage waa made disagreeably conspicuous on Saturday, as many hundreds resorted thither rather than contribute a sixpence to the club fund. The attendance in the field was, however, very numerous the grand stand contained a respeota- ble company, and the spectators below must have numbered nearly three thousand. The kick off was fixed for half-past three, and the respective teams were punctual in making their appearance on the field. The following are the names: —Newport: T. Ponsford, back; C. F. Thompson and ;A. J. Moggridge, three-quarter-baoks y G. Rosser, half.back; C. H. Newman and T. Spittle, quarter-backs D. L. Evans, A. Goss, F. A. Goss, G. T. Harding, E. Jenkins, H. S. Lyne, B. H. Loane, W. Phillips (captain), and W. Ponsford, forwards. Neath S. Clark, back; L. J. Kempthorne andB. Edwards, three-quarter- backs; B. Haycock and J. Moxham, quarter- backs; T. P. Whittington (captain), T. Williams, B. Gordon, F. David, M. Jones, — Cusse, A. Green, — Peters, H. W. Davies, and F. Sadler, forwards. Beferee, Mr. C. Herbert, Land and Water, and umpire, Mr. B. Mullock. Newport won the toss for selection of goal, ,and the ball was kicked off by the cap- tain of the Neath team. It was speedily driven into Neath territory, where the first scrum- mage ensued. On the escape of the leather from the struggling group, it was seized by a Neath man, but he was at once collared. It then got into Newman's hands, who succeeded in making a splendid run, and, on being intercepted, he passed it to Roner. By Bosser it was conveyed into close proximity to the Neath goal, where, amidst some excitement, a severe scrummage took place. The Newport men gained the advantage, being evidently the stronger team, and Neath was obliged to touch down in self-de- fence. a Whittington having kicked off the ball, it was caught by Bosser, who made a gallant run-with it. but was collared. In the scrummage Jenkins secured the ball, and by a capital run and some clever dodging, which was applauded, carried it forward a considerable dis- tatce, when he was somewhat roughly overthrown and left on the ground. Rosser, however, was on the alert, and he followed up the advantage by securing the ball and making off with it across the field. Finding himself almost surrounded he passed it on to Moggridge, who was waylaid by a group of Neath men. After a scrum- mage the ball again fell into Rosser's hands, and by a series of passes, exe- cuted with great skill and agility, it reached Harding, who secured a try, a result which called forth an ovation for Newport from the excited spectators. After the "usual preliminary dis- pnte," Moggridge kicked for goal, but the position being one of disadvantage, he failed. After some good dribbling by Jenkins, the ball was kicked by W. Ponsford, and Neath were again compelled to touch down in self-defence. The ball, on being again kicked by Neath, was caught by Newman, who made a neat run with it, but was collared. A scrummage ensued,and the ball was dribbled forward into Neath territory, and so well kicked by Goss that Neath had once mote to resort to a touchdown to avert the less desirable result. On the recommencement of the play, a good run was made by Neath, and resulted in a scrummage, which gave the advantage to New- port. Some splendid passing by Newport followed, the ball going from man to pian in quiok Succes- sion, right asroes the field, a feat which drew from the sensitive onlookers another round of ap- plause. Its further progress waa prevented by the Neat,h men, but in the scrummage it was secured by Spittle, who made off with it, and after evading a number of opponents, passed it to. W. Ponsford. He was collared, but in the Bcrummage Spittle aga.in obtained possession of the ball, and kicked it forward. It was caught by Thompson, and passed in succession to Newman and Jenkins, and thus brought across the field, where another scrummage took place. It next fell into W. Ponaford's hands, who passed it to Moggridge, by whom it was thrown''to another player, and kicked nearer to the Neath goal. Alter a scrum- mage Harding got the ball, kicked it forward, and by the Neath backs it was sent ia touch. It was next caught by Newman, and after a smart run passed fro:n him to Mog- gridge, who kicked it in touch close to the Neath goal line. From the scrummage Jenkins escaped with the ball, but was soon intercepted, and after another scrummage the Neath men succeeded in gaining a few yards, and were encouraged bycrias of Well-played, Neath." 1 hey did not maintain the advantage, and the ball getting into the hands of Mocrgridge he made a splendid run with it. and by a drop-kick gained the first goal, amidst en. thusiastic cheering. After another preliminary dispute," with regard to an alleged "hand ball," the game was resumed, the ball being kicked off by Whittington. It was returned into Neath terri. tory by Newman, but again kicked forward. Spittle then secured it, and made a clever run, which resulted in a scrummage on Neath ground. Rosser next ran off with the bali, but was stopped by the Neath back, Clark, and it was kicked in touch. A scrummage resulted in the overthrow of the Neath men, who were nearly all laid flat on the green sward, and W. Ponsford kicked the ball close to the Neath goal, where it was intercepted by Clark, but again driven forward by Newman. David, of Neath, here made a good run, but it transpired that the ball had been in touch, and he was brought back. In the scrummage Newman secured the leather, and from him it was passed to Rosser, who threw it forward, and another scrummage took place in the Neath 25. This resulted in Newman again gaining possession of the ball, and dribbling it forward several yards, when it was caught by Phillips, who compelled Neath to touch down in Belf-defence. After the kick off some neat dribbling by Harding, and a run by Spittle, brought the ball once more into the Neath 25. It was then secured by Newman, and passed to RoBser, who made a capital run, but was overthrown by Sadler. In the scrummage Gordon obtained possession and made off, but was stopped by Newman, and a Bcrummage then ensned. Spittle then became the holder of the ball and passed it to Moggridge, who made an admirable run and evaded a number of opponents before he was collared.. From the scrummage it got into Newman's hands, and was then passed to Bosser, who by a capital run carried it into the Neath 25, where he fell. Some good play by Jenkins and Newman was the next noteworthy item, and when half-time was called, the Neath goal was in danger. The bystanders here encouraged the players, who had certainly worked hard, by another ovation. The result had been regarded as a foregone con. clusion, and the hopeless battle the Neath men were fighting was made the subject of some good- natured banter by the elated friends of Newport. Tho Neath men, though anticipating a defeat, did not expect to be so completely overpowered, and at thie point in the game they certainly seemed somewhat crestfallen. With them the match hail so far, been all hard uphill lighting, and those who are acquainted with the Rugby roles will un. stand the difficulty of this task. Eton hag her wall, Winchester her picked eleven players and canvas walled boundaries, Charterhouse her cloisters, and Marlborough her "squashes," "place-kicks," and" runs m," but none of these involve so much bard work, or lay the player open to so much rougn usage, as the Rugby game. The Neath team, lea on by an energetic captain, did their best under the cir. cumctances, and stood their manfully till the termination of the matcn, knowing well that they had not a ehadow of a chance. Having changed goals, play was resumed by Phillips kicking the ball. It was returned by the Neath backs, secured by W. Ponsford, who made a good run, and, on being waylaid, mistook a foe for a friend, and innocently passed the ball to a Neath man, who received it with a smile. He was, however, collared, and after a scrummage in the Neath 25, and some capital kickixg on both sides, Jenkins obtained posses- sion of the leather, and with surprising agility evaded his pursuers and gained a try, and Mog. gridge kicked for goal, but the:ball went wide, the kick being from an angle, and the Neath men securing it, they touched down in self-defence. The ball, on being set free onoe more, was oaoght by Spittle, who ran with it across the field in handsome style, and was ultimately collared by Sadler. The Neath backs kicked the ball, but it was driven forward again by Moggridge, and was caught by Jenkins, who, having a clear course before him, made for the Neath goal, and touched down between the posts, gaining another try. Jenkins, who had certainly distinguished himself during the game, was here made the subject of three hearty choers. Moggridge kicked for goal, but again the ball went wide, and was driven back by Whittington. Some fine play by Newport followed, Spittle, A. Goes, Mcggridge, tmd Jcnfcuw making A wtowi* sion of gallant runs, and bringing the ball into tbe Neath 25, where Sadler caught it and gained a free kick. The ball next got into the possession of Jenkins, and was by him passed to Rosser, who was collared by Gordon, and a scrummage ensued. Newman then succeeded in escaping with the ball, and, evading Sadler and a numbef of others who were in close pursuit, conveyed it into the Neath 25. From him it reached Hardingi who kicked it forward, and Clark, after a vain endeavour to make off with it, touched down is self defence. On being returned to the field, the ball was caught by Moggridge; and after scrummage it passed into W. Ponsford's hands, and by some splendid playing went from him to Newman, from Newman to Rosser, and froffl Bosser to Thompson, who kioked it into a posi- tion dangerous to Neath. After a scrummage, L. Evans got a maul in goal, which resulted in Neath touching down in salf-dafenoe. On being kicked off, the ball was taken possession of by Gordon, who made a good run. He was stopped, and it was driven on to Neath ground, secured by Spittle, and with little difficulty another try was gained, the Neath baehs being away from the goal. The kisk for goal by Moggridge was again a failure, the. ball passing: under the posts, where it was caught by Clark, who, on being assailed by Phillips, touched down in self-defence. Before many more minutes had elapsed the ball was in the possession of Newman, who made a clever run, and on being collated, passed it to Moggridge. This ocenrred almost in the centre of the field, but Moggridge, by his superiority in running, eluded those in chase, overthrowing several, ana making in a circuit for the rear of the goal, he gained a try, for which feat he was warmly applauded. The kick by Moggridge resulted in a goal, and the bystanders gave venti to their enthusiasm in another spirited ovation. The ball,, on being kicked by Whittington, wasoaught by Moggridge, and, after a struggle, passed to Jenkins, and from } him to Newman, who was collared, and a free kick gained by Neath. It was again caught by Newman, and from a scrummage it got into Thompson's hands, who ran with it into the Neath 25, amidst great applause, and was ultimately caught by the leg by Clark, and over- thrown. Newman then secured the ball, made a capital run, and passed it to A. Goss, who was collared by Gordon. By Bosser, Gordon was brought tc a stand, and Neath then secured a third free kiok. The bail was, however, kioked straight up in the air, and, on falling, was caught by Newman, who kicked it ovar the goal line, where it was touched down in self defence bJ Gordon. An interesting incident here oeourred. Clark, the Neath back, had injured hia ankle, and, being unable to walk, had lain down at the rear of the goal posts. On seeing the goal threatened he at once jumped up, and limped forward to his post, for which display of pluck he was heartily applauded. He was again obliged to retire in consequence-of the injury to his foot, and did not take any active part at the conclusion of the game. After some BcrnmtaageB Thompson made a smart run, and n-om. JenkiM to Rosser and from Bosser to Thompson the ball was passed with accomplished skill. Thompson waB collared by Kempthorne, and more scrummages ensued. Some good drib- bling by Bosser and a kick from W. Ponsford sent the ball again olose to the Neath goal, and Neath touched down in self defence. Time was then colled, and the players left the field to participate in the dinner which had been prepared for them at the [King's Head Hotel. The result of the match was as followsNewport, 2 goals, 4 tries, and 8 touchdowns.

STRANGE CONDUCT OF A FATHER.

ALLEGED MALICIOUS ACT UPON…

I THE VALUE OF HUMAN LIFE.

ROYAL VISIT TO OXFORD. -

THE STRIKE AT DUNRAVEN COLLIERY,…

THE RESTORATION OF LLANDAFF…

[No title]