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AGBICCLTCBAL NOTES.

* FARM SPBING WORK.

TENANT FARMERS AND THEIR .…

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OUR LONDON LET

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OUR LONDON LET ,fER. trsOH ouB own cowor '1 Iainkulungwaneesiakumi" v was the sice long oomfor (tons of thousands), Captain Augustus Lindl' wayo's inquiry some ye* # «ww«ed King Cety- were many breeohkw >rsagoastowhether there way to the African in England. On his passed through 7 «WJ«lda CaptamLindley Cetywayoand b; territory and astonished a breechloader A warriors by showing them wh*t They are wi eAd a Boxer eartridge could do. carried tb, AW am. Thosunds of them have iroldfield Martini-Henrys and Sniders at the derful But where did they get their won- Qazf military organisation? The Cologne [ df Åe pnUishes a letter from an old Bettler, fieeating the idea that German officers have I jQ»ibrd them. The military training of the Zulus is, be says, far older than the rrussian. lney wore dreaded enemies of the white man in 1830, and their tactics are precisely the same now as they were then. I fanoyagood many people have been speculating en the subject. On<* of the faults attributed to the wotno light is that it is intermittens. It flickers. So it does in pablic regard, too. At first it waa going to earry everything before it, and gas shares would bet worthless. The Holborn Viaduct experiment was held by many to be crucial aa to street illumination. But the Commissioners of powers do not think so. They are not continue the experiment. Their oondemaat! of the light, however, based, aa tlt ,18.. on economic prinoiptea for the _08 p. A. is not very sweeping. The ooet w*a sevev^ and a half timea that of gas; but the ugnt 1"1U seven timoa greater. Thia pretty well square matters; but it was added that the gas lig^at was more equally divided. The (Sty is getur^gr wonderfully economical, few, at tha aame meeting, the expan- diture of the London 1iJch?Ol Boa.rd was denounced as enormous. I don t thmk iibe electric light or the School Board, bewever, will be snuffed out justyet. Alexandra House, the Home for Working GulemSt. Job ..street, West Smitafield, is to have a sister house at the West-end, in Quedu's- road, Bayswaier. Snch aa institution is qnite aa necessary ia the latter situation as in the former. Victoria House, as the new building is to bewailed, wiil at once be opened as a boarding bouse for those engaged in business, on the follow- ing terms ;—Board, i.e., breakfast, dinner, and tea (Sundays included), 4s. 6d. per week. Thoae who do not require full board can have separate meals at the following prices Breakfast 2¡d., dinner 6d., tea 2!d., or supper Id. Every girl in the Home has to pay a weekly sum of 1110 9d. or 2s. 6d. for lodging, and they have also to pay for their own washing. Of course these charges do not make the place self-supporting; but a higher scale would exclude the very class for who m the Homes are designed. Some time ago the more bibulous portion of the community was shocked by the revelations made about plastered sherry. It is quite possible that the discovery drove some persons back to their beer. They would stick to malt and hops-if they could get them. A good deal of confidence, not to say credulity, waa necessary to make one believe in the malt or the hop and now some facts have come out about beer which throw the plaatered sherry into the shade, and are calculated to send us back to pure water and make 118 thankful if we can get that. In a case tried before the Master of the Bolls, and which is said to have pro- duced a startling effect on Sir George Jessel, some questions—which were, to say the least, suggestive — were asked as te the fining of beer, ale, and porter, and restoring them when sour. The parties in question were called upon to state whether they used suorate of slime or sugar and ooleio oxide in restoring or fining beer; whether they had not cured 2,000 hogsheads of beer which had become "aiok," and whether they had used any other additional materials. They replied that they used the form uniformly used in restoring or fining beer—pure lime or whiting, or both mixed—and that the custom of using these ingredients was common among the brewers. This will render many of us suspicions of the beer when it sparkles, and suggest the idea of lime and coleio oxide rather than malt and hops. Professor Clifford's death took me by surprise, though I knew, of course, that he was very ill. The first time I ever saw him was when he lectured at St. George's Hall on Walt Whitman's poetry. He was not a good reader; but his attainments in other respects were very conspicuous. That he should die at the early age of 37 Emeritus Professor of Applied Mathematics at University College, London, attests his almost precocious genius. He graduated Second Wrangler and First Smith's Prizeman in 1867, and was elected Fellow of Trinity the next year. But he vacated his fellowship by marriage, and, I am afraid, leaves hia wife and family poorly provided for. It was not so very long ago I met him acoi. dent-.1ly in a railway carriage, and as he con. versed with me in his peculiarly thin mild voice, I thought how little the other occupants of the compartment would have guessed what a tremen- dous iconoclast it was I was talking to. Another link in the past is gone. Little Bed Biding Hood is demolished now. Not content with explaining away Cinderella for the fiftieth time, Mr. Balston, at St. James's-hall, acted Niebuhr to the myth of Bed Riding Hood and the Wolf. Now the current has set in all the old nursery stories will 'to, just as Romulus and Bemus have gone. By the way, I wish. Dr. Schliemann-would go to fiome and turn up something belonging to the she-wolf's offspring, ijusb as he has unearthed the sur- roundings of Agamemnon, king of men, if not the monarch of Mycenae himself. What do the destructive mythologists say as to the siege of Troy being only a solar myth now? some of the juvenile critics (who are the best in this case) looked at Mr. Balston as though they evidently thought he was story-telling in the sense which that phrase bears according to the Tode of infantile morality. But he tells his stories uncommonly well, and I should think the unfortunate Glasgow Bank sufferers, in whose interest he told them, would reap considerable benefit. It is well that some kind of story-telling should benefit them. One reason why the electric lights on Holborn Viaduct have proved a failure is that they were fitted with glasses so thick that two-thirds of the light given out, so to speak, is absorbed and never leaves the opaline globe in which it is encased. Bnt another is not far to seek; the fact ia that a large number of members of the London Common Coun- cil, who are interested in gas shares to a large ex. tent, have never ceased to find fault with the new invention, and are said to have forced the special committee which had to inquire into the matter to report against it. They may be sure, however, that if electricity is worth anything for lighting, their opposition will only delay its use for a very little while. I hear that Mr. George Conquest got thirty thousand pounds for his interest in the Grecian Theatre. He has retired from the nsrthern house of amusement, of which he has been the moving genius for so long, a fairly rich man, for, if report be correct, he had saved a good deal of money besides. The success he had made at the Grecian was wholly and solely due to his own versatile genius. He is one of the best gym. nasts, as he is one of the cleverest actors living, and whether he appeared on the stage as a man, an octopus, or a tree, has been always both clever and amusing. He will not, I hear, give up the theatrical profession, but, although he leaves the Grecian, will continue in the service of the public. By the way, he used to contrive all his own pan- tomimes, which were admittedly amongat the best in London. Perhaps now he quits the Grecian he may give us something good at a more western theatre. Weare sadly off for good things just now. I saw a very novel exhibition recently in the Strand. On a window was marked up a notice to the effect that paasera-by might have their boots soled and heeled for half-a crown, while they waited, and ladies could meet with the same assistance for eighteen-penoe. There was a large crowd in front of the place, and inside the window were two men with a novel kind of iron apparatus, made in the form of a foot, upon which they were soling and heeling the pedal coverings of a pale young man who was waiting in the shop. The interest taken by the crowd, so long as there yet remained a pieee of leather to nail on, was simply unbounded. They had evidently seen nothing of the mystery of bootmaking before. Yet, cheap bootmaking is not the only descrip tion of clothing which London produces at a low rate. Quitting the Strand, I reached Piccadilly, and presently the Brompton-road, when I came to a large shop, in the window of which was a notice to theeSect that the proprietor of the place, anxious to keep pace with the co-operative stores, had resolved to sell the beat pantaloona for five shillings and ninepence. and black coats .or eight shillings—that, the notice intimated, was the prioe of the "Palmerston nonpariel fashion- able suit." I could not call to mind-having once be- fore heard of Lord Palmerston's predilection for five and ninepenny continuations," but perhaps that ia owing to my ignorance. Jne of the Cabinet Ministers will accompany the Queen during her Majesty's visit to Italy and her stay there, but it is not as yet decided which one. Lord Cranbrook was the most likely to be selected, but I understand that affaus m India are thought still to demand his constant attention. Of course Lord Salisbury cannot go Coloner- Stanley is equally busy, and Sir Michael Hicka. Beach has quite enough to think of. let some. body will have to go with her Majesty, and the question is still, Who shall it be*" I hear on very good authority that Lieutenants Bromhead and Chard, who commanded the de- fence at Eorke's Drift, are both to receive the Victoria Croes, and that a monument is to be erected at Aldershot to the memory of Lieuten- ants Melville and Coghill, who saved the colours of the 24th Regiment. Some means of commemo. rating the gallant fight made by the troops at Isandula are also to be devised; but what they are ia not at present decided. The Queen will also cause Brmnhead and Chard to be promoted at once, so that they will gain some substantial reward for their bravery. And there ia a plan on foot for recompensing their men; but what that is I do not yet know. Lieutenant James, of the Scots Greys, who has gone to Zululand as a volunteer with the 17th Lancers, after having engaged himself to be married to Misa Miliais, daughter of the great artist, was out in Turkey as a spectator during the war, and in company with Captain Godson, cf the King's Dragoon Guards, also gone to Zulu, land, was present at the heavy fighting at Kamazk, ail<Í in the retreat which Baker Pasha go skilfully arranged. He was also at Shipka, and witnessed some of the terrible fighting there, writing some very eleyer reports from both places to General £ >ir Collingwood Dickson, the principal English iiuitary Attache at Constantinople, He was esteemed an excellent young officer and a brave man. Only one occupant of the Front Opposition Bench voted in favour of Women's Suffrage. That one was Mr. Stansfeld, who haa. perhaps, leas weight in politics than even _Mr. KnatchbulL- Hngeseen. Mr. Brighu, Sir William Harcourt, Mr., Lowe, Mr. Chilaers, and Sir Henry James voted against the proposal. Mr. Gladstone and Lord HariingtoB did not vote at all. Following tbe hint of the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Treasury Bench went with him a^d Mr. Cross into tie rights-of-man lobby* On otharaido Mr* Fa w- eett voted, as of oid, with his friend Hr. Courtney. as the working man's repreWBUtivo, wa* chivalrous. Mr. Macdonald was not present. Mr. i r Trevelyan went, aa he should do, for the ex ten- I lion of the suffrage. Sir Charles Dilke showed < Radicalism is not afraid of having to oonve ] the gentler sex. Among the Conservatives fo I in favour of the measure were Mr. Gorst, m 1 for Chatham Mr. PuleBton, member tor port; Mr. Forsyth, the representative ■ bone; General Shute, from B«g> (mirabile dictu) Mr. Wheelhouse to see Wheel'us" and Mr. Benja- r of the United Kingdom Allianr ff^owi one another in the divnaon list. K ™ *> Mr- Beresford t* „ >lwljpHBphlet that they do care i\^tsshlin<ieed- Those ladies are le«- and are exclusive of those wlStn o? ^'in the movement. Theyare-l. « positions, such as aohool board o cer:a..i r;ruardians of the poor. 2. Women .*literature and art, 3. Women foliow- 1 a- aD<l professional careers. 4. Women ^^n educational work. 5. Those engaged P jSetfthropic work; and, lastly, those who are p.- and have left behind them written expres- ^QDS of opinion in favour of the measure. These fnciude Miss Mary Carpenter, Mrs. Grote, Mrs. Jameson, Lady Anna Gore-Langton, Miss Martineau, MrB. Nassau Senior, aud Mrs. Somerville. In sooth a goodly company "No more of Johnny Keata," wrote Lord Byron; and there seems a probability of our get. ting more than enough of Mm just now. The papers are flooded with anecdotes of him as if it were the height of the silly season. Two people are disputing as to priority in telling the story of Keat's throwing out of the window a dinner which had been sent in by trattore. If he ever did so foolish a thing the less said about it the better. We have put Keats's monument up in Westminster Abbey, and labelled the house in Borne where he died. Now let him rest.

OUR OLD MOBILITY.

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