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AGBICCLTCBAL NOTES.

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AGBICCLTCBAL NOTES. WRTTTIV ExruKflBLT BT FINIS'S Dim, ESQ* iBH FARMER S UNIONS DESIRABLE? 11 De formation of tenant farmers'nnions has hMm <MtMMM M one of the nmedieø for the nHff «| the present depressed state of agrieoi- late. A meeting to inaugurate such a onion WM to be held at Warwick this week and in other tMtliBM etrch combinationB are talked of. It is, fcrwocT, difficult to realise the good purpoeea )jM<w to' result from each anions. They may grot»atoM for the ventilation of difficulties and MMYmncds: and in then hard times may draw tegethe* fellow sufferers, and enable them tr J exchange soothing sympathy. But they can little farther; ttoeir effortB must begin an*" <ond with t8Jk.. *&ey cannot expect to eater ,48 their -eonchitktsB, however reasonable and. !'hey eancot raise or add to the sadly ne capital, cuboiUe swishine, or deterir .1M auspicious WMUMM, or regulate prices, or c or increase production. It is scarcely ^^ujble, even if it J wore desirable, to use aur A ^ujona u political eogjaea for either of politics. Although taking to„higber ain* A" will certainly appear tahave been oovBti+^tod to make a stand against landlords on tha two band, and labourers on the "other. Tbey will probably be regarded byiand- lorda in snoK the same light in which labourers' unions were eome years ago regarded by tenant fawners. Kindly feelings woald he jeopardised; «1S08 would thereby be set against class. In the present agricultural crisis it ie, how- 1 ever, specially desirable that landlords aad, tenants should work together. Co-operation at;tkia time must be mutually advantageous. With a strong pull together they may secure some further remissions or te-diatribntionof the looa 1 burdens whichpres8 so heavily on land. They may obtain properly constituted county boards They may get a minister of agriculture to watch more narrowly over their interests. The still larger questions of entail and hypothec, of dis- baint for rent, and of the transfer and registra- tion of land property may also before long come to the front for general discussion and amena. meat, and deeply affecting as they do the interests of occupiers as well as owners of land, might be advantageously debated at chambers of agrioalture. and dabs comprehending landlords as well as farmers. Bents and covenants, liberty of action, and payments for unexhausted improvements, woald presumedly occupy a large share of the attention of üepMpoaed farmers unions. But such two- Bided topics, wàichadmittedly demand reconsider, tticc in many localities, in a purely farmers meeting, would probably be looked at ehiefly from one point of view. In class discussions, prejudice is with difficulty held in abeyance. Opposing forces are often needful to reaiiae a happy mean. Moreover, aee not farmers, by forming a sort of close guild about to hide their lights and their troubles, diaadvantageonsly limit their auditory, and lose convenient opportunity of setting forth their wants, their difficulties and proposals to landlords, agents, and family solicitors ? Surely this is short-sighted policy on the part of those who would start on a mission to regenerate the fallen fortunes of farming Into the chambers and clubs already in opera. lion, they might usefully infuse more activity and enthusiasm. It would benefit both themselves and their calling, if they would turn out in greater force at such meetings. They need have no fear that liberty of speech would be interfered with. The daya are gone when honest, plain, ontspokeness injures tenant farmers, or anyone else. In the present agircultural situation, with too many vacant farms, all who have land to let are naturally desirous to make reasonable terms with men of capability and means. But neither Englishmen nor Welshmen like even the appear. anee of coercion or dictation. A strong tenant farmer.1 union, if such an institution were ever formed, would have diiBculty in persuading landowners to adopt ita views, or follow out its suggestions. Is it likely that landowners, who so generally demurred to follow the precepts of the Agricultural Holdings Act of 1875--set forth with all the authority of a carefully considered legislative enactment—would accept the un. authorised teaching of farmers unions ? There are other more promising channels into which in- telligent farmers can turn their energies.

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