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.MR ASQUITH. ..

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MR ASQUITH. Free Trade Maintained. HECKLERS AND HOME RULE. "FEATHER-HEADED PROPHETS." Prime Minister occupied the eve of the in East Fife by addressing meetings at J>|^CeS alonS the southern shore of the Firth of At N ewburgh, in the far west corner of the jonstituency, there was a crowded and en- thusiastic gathering of electors.1 Mr Asquith said We are now more than railway through the General Election, and jbere are some confident, and 1 think rather **»therheaded,prophets who areinakingpredic- tions as to what the general result is going to I am not going to follow their example •HI we are nearer in sight of the end, but I would refer to features of the election which Me already settled, and which no subsequent pollings can possibly in any substantial degree modify or alter. I notice that the other night > distinguished speaker on the Tory side (Mr Walter Long) had the hárclihood-I might almost c all it the magnificentbardihood-totell meeting in Wiltshire that we were now Witnessing the death struggle of Free Trade. (Laughter.) Well, let us see how Free Trade has fared in that death struggle which the im- agination of Mr Long has ben good enough and creative enough to perceive. London, it is wue, has spoken with a divided voice, and what we call the bOlIDe counties immediately round. London have to a large extent returned to the region of Toryism from which in 1906 they were shaken because they could not stand the rtrarn and the stress of the ineptitude and the 'tapotence of their Tors Government. (Cheers.) Voice of Industry. But if we look to the industrial districts of Oreat Britain, outside of Birmingham and Liverpool and perhaps Nottingham, we see libat they have with a degree of emphasis and decisiveness which it is impossible to question or to challenge, pronounced against that thing called Tariff Reform and in favour of Free Tt-ade. (Cheers.) If we look to Laccashire, the teat of the great cotton industry which we were told a few years ago was languishing under Free Trade, the votes of those engaged in that industry have been re- inforced as they were by the votes of another great industry—the mining industry—em- phatically for Free Trade. (Cheers.) A little further North, in my own native county of Yorkshire, which is the seat and centre of the woollen industry, also of a large mining dtecnct, we See the same verdict, if possible, will more emphatically delivered, and I observe that lathe West Riding they finished off a Rood week's work on Saturday by sending back to London, I think, the chief apostle of Tariff Reform in the lecture-room and the *"ress -with a majority against him of some- ™ing like two to one. (Laughter and cheers.) Further North stall.—in Northumberland and Darha.m-and in the industrial districts of Scotland which have already polled, we see precisely the same phenomenon, and, if pos- MMe, still moreble is it to notice how geeat ports, the centres of shipbuilding and ♦tapping, had declared in the same sense, w we look on the Bast coast we shall find the ttumber, the Tees, the Tyne, the Forth, and thè Tay, all for Free Trade, and if we loofT on 1he West coast we should find an equally strik- tog manifestation in the same sense on the ^jj^of the Clyde and the BrigUd Channel. Overwhelming. So that the death struggle of Free Trade, Much Mr Long was able to depict for his own insolation and that of his friends, when it eameø to be looked at a little more closely, is 8een to be a decisive wing pronounce- ment on the part of the great industrial dis- ttfcts of this ooootry in favour of the mainte- of our present fiscal system. (Cheers.) 4knd these arethemcp who are actulhr engaged Jtttbe mdustnee which Free Trade is sop- iMaed to threaten. Those are the men whom We we told by having foreign goods dumped ™to tiie market are unable to nfnumfaip them- ■ww and their trade against the stress of foreign importation these are the meai who are being handicapped by foreign tariffs in the neutral markets of the world. These are the men in these ports who bcod- ling the goods, the exports and impoite, and they have deitveped Miat i nuiliiitji verdict against any revival of Protection. That is one Rreat feature of the election which nothing can qualify. (Cheers.) There is aaoiber one which I oas perhaps more direct application. There is ^extraordinary solidity of Scotland- (Cheers.) I e I am right in saying that but for a jeat which was thrown amy in Glasgow through a split Free Trade vote we Tipw have Scotland in as good a position slSctcraOy at Westminster as we were when We reached the Ugh water mark pf Scottish liberalism tow years ago. (Cheers.) The Haofcetr Again. gaeuwLUjj 'of mile on liberal ntne^pisB. Beiqg asked If be wooidptedselBmseS to the ■principle of the retention of ibe Irish members it W. Mr Aspriftarid, I am not Toing to enter into any de&utts with regard to A Home Bale BBl." Was Mr Asquilh aware thrit Mr (Ba&ifcane declared that It passed the wit of mem to ieviae any Mbote by which tbatcoadd be oatt Mr iflqaith: lAont think he used any ex- pression of the kind in that connection. A heckler asked if the right hen. gentleman was in favour of wtcwudnm. Mr Asquith There are great fascinations to the architect of poHttea) schemes in the idea of the referendum At one time I was bitten by Jfc. bat the more one thinks oi it and sees otf it ra other cocxnteiea the more impractacabie and able to oar British conditions doss it Appear to me to be. QaestioDed about the details of the Hnane aule Bill far Ireland, Mr Asqnith 88id t- I have laid down two principles which cover the whole ground. You moot set op, if yon are going to have a satisfactory sotoraon of this question, a body which will have fall powers of self government in purely Irish > afiairs. That wotdd not include control of the fiscal question. As far as this country is concerned, whatever body you set up, we must maintain in the Imperial Parliament aDd Imperial Qcwiimieat here absolutely unquestioned authority over everything else. Asked about Home Rule for Scotland, Mr Asquith replied: I have been always in favour of Home Rule for Scotland. Years-aaod years I said so. The Heckler Would it not be a good thing to couple it with the Irish Bill ? Mr Asquith One thing at a time. A vote of confidence was passed by a large majority. At another meeting an elector asked, Are you still in favour of granting Home Rule to Mthmd by instalments ? Mr Asquith I am not sure I ever used that resøion. I am in favour of granting to Ire- a full measure of self-government in rela- wen to purely Irish affaire—subject to the un- faapaired supremacy of the Imperial Parlia- ment and the Imperial Government.

A PORT TALBOT " HOME."

BEDWELLTY DISTRICT COUNCIL

[No title]

MR BALFOUR. .

SPANISH WINE YIELD.

FOMENTED BY STUDENTS.

ITIME AND TIDE. ---,------.

MEMENEIM Marooned Mariners…

ABERGAVENNY DIVORCE CASE.

NEATH DESERTION CHARGE.1

.,------------------.-, DESPISE…

TROUT FROM CARDIFF.

. BEDWAS ELECTOR ZEAL.

[No title]

Canadian Disaster. ..

MISLAID RUSSIAN GUNS.

BANDITS' ESCAPE.

BOMBS BY POST CASE. —— I

COLLISION IN THE CHANNEL.

A RARE DISEASE.

iRAID ON A CLUB.

South Wales Goal Trade.

LLAHELLY LAW SUiT.

DEFIANT CHIEf RABBI.

HAMMERED THE DOOR AND THEN…

-----,.,-BUILTH WELLS IAltÆ…

[No title]

MR LLOYD GEORGE .

MR CHURCHILL

OADBURY BROS., LTD.

-------CARDIFF PARKS" COMMITTEE.

LONDON "PLAQUE SPOT."