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-_-Synopsis of Previous Chapters.

LONDON PRESS CLUB. ---.

ABERYSTWYTH COLLEGE.

SINGULAR EXPLOSION IN NEW…

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AN UNFORTUNATE FAMILY.

FRAUD ON FORESTERS.

BARON SENT TO PRISON.

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------------------+-----PONTYPRIDD…

FOUND DEAD IN BED.

EIGHT HOURS ADRIFT.

WELSH INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION.

MAESTEG MILK VENDOR SUMMONED.

--"'--t.. FIRE AT CARDIFF.

MR O'BRIEN, MP~^Tl)0WLAiS.

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MR O'BRIEN, MP~^Tl)0WLAiS. Irish National Progress. On Sunday afternoon at the Oddfellows Hall, Dowlais, a meeting was held under the auspices of the Thomas Davies (Dowlais) branch of the United Irish League of Great Britain, in com- memoration of the Emmet Centenary. Mr Joseph Caugblin presided. He alluded to the absence at Belfast of Mr Devlin, M.P., who bad been expected to be present, but was glad to have with them Mr J. F. X. O'Brien, M.P. Mr J. Gallivan moved, and Mr Patrick Lane seconded a resolution declaring the adherence of the meeting to the principles of self-government for Ireland, expressing thanks to the Irish Parliamentary party and confidence in their ultimate success. Mr OBrien, who was received with prolonged applause, said they had reason to be proud of the splendid traditions which had come down to them. In no generation had their country been without heroic men ready to sacrifice their lives and everything else for the sake of their country. The history of Ireland was not going to end with them. Those who came after them would have to carry the flag forward and be ready to make sacrifices should they be necessary. Many Irish boys and girls, it bad been feared, were in danger of being Anglicised, so for years he had been in favour of forming a junior branch of the League in support of the movement to instruct the children in Irish his- tory, national songs, and language. There were a great many Irish people in Great Britain who had never seen Ireland at all, but these men made greater sacrifices than even the men at home, and deserved recognition for this fact. Twelve months ago if anyone had assured him they would win on the land question as they had done he would not have thought it possible, but notwithstanding that they had won a measure that would, he thought, set tie the land question in Ireland. The one danger that struck him was that the tenants were too eager and in too great a hurry. If they could only restrain their eager' ness, be calm and give the landlords a little time to cool down it would be much better for them. A great many mistakes had been made in the prices given for the land. To pay 23 or 24 years' pur- chase for the land was a monstrous thing. There was no reason why they should give such prices. Eighteen years' purchase was, he thought, a splendid price for the landlords. If the Land Act was carried out amicably they would easily get a compulsory Act for those who held back and refused to sell. Mr Chamberlain's fiscal policy was in the air. They did not know what was going to happen by and bye, but he thought they could fairly say, whatever was going to happen, the Irish Parliamentary party would come out right in any case. He looked forward with a great deal of satisfaction, hope, and en- couragement. (Applause.) Mr John Valentine supported the resolution, which was carried.

"ACTED LIKE A BRUTE."

STAMP DUTY ON COUGH DROPS

CHARGE OF STEALING 19,000…

PROTESTANT ALLIANCE CONGRESS.

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