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ABERYSTWYTH

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ABERYSTWYTH More Conscientious Objectors. The borough Tribunal under the Military Service Act sat for tne third time on Fri- day rnornmg. Aid. John Evans, the mayor, pre&idect and all the other members of the TrJounai were present, namely, Mr D. C. Roberts, Aldermen E. P. Wynne, Edwin Morr.s, Councillors Capt. Doughton, David Davies, T. J. Morrison, Rhys Jones, with Messrs John Evans, clerk; Henry Bonsall, military representative; and Major L. J. Math.as, recruiting officer. Thirty-one applications were dealt with, including two conscientious objections and in all the casea excepting the two last applications exemptions, or postponements, were granted. Messrs W. P. Owen, William Davies, T. J. Samuel, Daniel Jones, and Emrys Williams appeared as solicitors in support of a number of applications. Some of the applicants were the main support of widowed mothers and .others stated that they had been accepted for home service only. The applicants also included married men with families de- pendent on them, while others, such as f bakers, claimed exemption on the ground that they are employed in certified occupa- tions and could not be replaced. The applicants also included students who were granted postponement until July 3rd in order to complete their degree examina- tions. after which they stated they were prepared to offer their services. Mr P. B. Loveday, who was granted exemption, claimed that he was the owner and manager of the oldest business of san- itary engineer and plumber in the town, if not in the county. His employees, with one exception, were above military age and it was important in their interasts that the bus ness should be continued. In addi- tion to business and financial obligations, he also had domestic responsibilities. He had encouraged nine of his employees to enlist and had done all he could to support the prosecution of the war. Dr E. A. Lewis, professor of economics and political sciences, lecturer in paleo- graphy at the College. and temporary v- rden of the Men's Hostel, submitted that he was doing work of national im- portance and of exceptional character. Serious hardship would be caused to his dependents and to the students attending the classes in his department. Owing to the loss of an assistant, he had to do the work single-handed. Owing to nervous trouble, defective vision, and other defects he was pos t ve that he was not likely to develop into. an efficient unit for line service. He was prepared to undertake any adminis- trative work connected with the war pro- vided the authorities were satisfied that in so doing he would be serving his country to better advantage than in carrying out the dut;es attached to his present office. The Registrar of the College wrote that Dr Lewi" was the only teacher in the de- partment and was preparing students for the rlegree examinations in June. Those students would suffer hardship as it was imnossible to procure another teacher with equal, or even similar qualifications. Most of the students, who were in poor circum- stances, would be seriously handicapped an* b. unable to complete their College career. Professor Edwards, on behalf of the ("Q1! "ge, supported the application and said t. at rrs Dr Lew's warc fit for home service on!v he was doing better service in national ■:rtv>rests in his present position. Mr RonsallWhat is paleography? p Professor Edwards-I thought you would l-:nr-*v. (Laughter). It is deciphering and r«v:dinK of old manuscripts and records in to get at the sources of history. Dr Lr s has been at this work for many year* nd it has affected his eyesight. It 33 grimly on that ground he is rendered jUnilt for military service. Dr Lewis had- ;9 ^nscientioue objection and would rather ,o traIght to the front than allow the ,ir-pre<!8;on that he was trying to shirk his He was doing better work, not for the students but for the country 'tHy than if he were to take up ids .in'strative work. Sir Bonsall- Would it be practicable to the College during the war? I1 ofeaxu- Edwards—That is for the con- j s. Sj :tton of the tribunal. 'L. D. C. Roberts—I do not think the :riruv al has anything to do with that. iv ly ng to Capt. Doughton, Professor1 ,.ili-i, rds said there were fifty students in i masses of Dr Lewis, men under age, and women. e rapt ion was granted so long* as the cant remains in his present occupa- :1. MDavid Samuel, headmaster of the *vj ty School, applied on behalf of a r.nnier of chemistry and botanv, certified i.. d.oally unfit. It was important, Mr ,wl said, that the scientific education x the future generation should be in no 1 ••••i ;mpaired. A male teacher was t'«.*x;&s»ry to manage boys in a chemical ^x-ratory. Governors had decided to bi-'ic up the teachers who had attested. l., '■ ould be well nigh impossible to fill the place at present. It was better; to seep him in his present position .than to remove him where he must necessarily toe put to do minor work. Exemption w-as granted so long as lie re-1 wuns 'n his present position. r r. the case of an yeast agent, it was stated that he had been thrice rejected a:;d came back from Liverpool to enable, hn brother to enlist. Postponement was granted until April 3rd to enable him to produce a certificate of rejection. • r Teviotdale applied on behalf of a baker, two of whose brothers are at antl who was the only employee of military age. Four employees had en-i rgted and he was sorry he could not spare another. There was a great difficulty in replacing bakers. Exemption was granted so long a* he remains in his present occu- Y't. ,c. 1 ^«.uuu. oiinnar exemptions were granted to a motor mail driver, general iron- monger, and to a clerk in the Town Hall whose dutie^ aro connected with war adm nistration and who will be forty-one years on March 18th. Exemptions were granted to the manager of a coal wharf and the foreman of a timber yard. Mr L. J. Morgan, general draper and outfitter. who in support of his application stated that he had neither a partner nor female employees, on being informed that he wai granted postponement until July 3rd remarked "That is no good to me." TTi e Clerk—I am only giving you the decision. Do you prefer that we should take this off? Yes. Why should other shopkeepers be exempt ? I know. It is all very well. I have not canvassed or asked anyone. I will take the matter further. The decision was adhered to. Mr J. E. Benbow, grocer, was granted an exemption so long as his business con- ditions remain the same. The Clerk explained that was because it was a certified occupation. In the case of Mr L. J. Morgan, it was not a certified occupation. In one case the tribunal was tied and in the other cases it wa. not. If certain occupations had not been certified by Government department" the decisions might be different. Mr G. E. Thomas, student in the Normal Department, applied for exemption on the grbund that it was absolutely impossible for him as a Christian to undertake service in the furtherance of war on any terms as it wars opposed to his conception of the loyalty he had sworn to the Lord Jesus Uhnst. By service in the furtherance of war he meant that he could not take the 7^. work, or undertake any work which directly, or indirectly, promotes the shedding of blood. He added that his work in preparing himself as a teacher was of national importance. It was in the best interests of the nation to provide fnr the education of the coming genera- tion. He conscientiously believed that he could not partake in any act of war, or have anything to do with military organ- isation. ether in the RA.M.C. or on a m ne-sweeper. He was quite prepared to bear the consequences. Replying to Mr Morrison, he said he had been a con- scientious objector for five years and could br'ng the Rev J. Lewis Williams as wit- ness. The Clerk-Y.ou say you are prepared to he^r the consequences because there is no danger to your life?—I am willing to die for my conscience. You know "that you will not. Nobody w'll ask you to. The Act says that you -i11 not suffer the death oenalty. Replying to Mr D. O. Roberts, applicant q-;(1 he was willjng tn do what he oould in alleviating pain and suffering, but not wrier military control. I The Oerk—What you man is that you are willing te alleviate pain almost in any rt" except where you are wanted to do i

[No title]

RURAL TRIBUNAL.I

Comforts for Fighters.

SAPPER JOHN MORRIS, R.E.,

PRIVATE D. S. EVANS,

-TALYBONT PHOTOS.

[No title]

Correspondence.

DEVILS BRIDGE.

Advertising

[No title]

PRIVATE THOMAS EVANS,I

ULANON.

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------------------------LLANGEITHO.

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ABERYSTWYTH

Comforts for Fighters.