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--THE LOSS OF THE VILLE DU…

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THE LOSS OF THE VILLE DU HAVRE. ARRIVAL OF THE CREW OF THE LOCH EARN. The officers and crew of the ship Loch Earn, Captain Robertson, that collided with the French steamship Ville du Havre, on the morning of Nov. 22, landed at Plymouth on Saturday night. After the rescued passengers and the crew of the Ville du Havre were transferred to the Trimountain, Captain Robertson tried to construct a jury bow, with spars and sails to protect the collision bulkhead, and had the vessel trimmed aft. Gales, however, set in, and the bulkhead gradually gave way through the force of the seas, 80 that by November 28 the vessel was in a sinking state. The ship British Queen, Captain Mastars, from Philadelphia with petroleum for Antwerp, then hove in sight, and the officers and crew of the Loch Earn, two passengers, and a fireman of the Ville du Havre, thirty-three souls in all, were transhipped to the British Queen, and on Saturday afternoon taken from her off the Lizard by a pilot boat of the port, and landed at Plymouth. The account given by the Loch Earn officers and crew differs widely from the Ville du Havre's account of the con- duct of the officers and crew on the occa- sion of the catastrophe. The captain and second mate of the Ville du Havre are alleged to have gone on board the Loch Earn with only one lady passenger, and to have remained there from shortly after the collison without tdking any active part in rescuing the passengers. The major part of the French crew are also charged with exhibiting lamentable cowardice, only one French boat taking active part in rendering assistance. Several pas- sengers swam to the Loch Earn. A lady swam alongside with a child in her arms. A rope was thrown to her, which she seized; but in attempt- ing to be pulled up, holding on by one arm, with the other round the child, her strength failed her, and the child was lost, but the poor mother was hauled on board. ALLEGED DISGRACEFUL CONDUCT OF THE CREW OF THE VILLE DU HAVRE. PLYMOUTH, Dec. 7.—The Loch Earn was an iron vessel of 1500 tons, belonging to the Glasgow Shipping Company, in ballast from London to New York. Her captain gives an official report of the collision in his log. He states that the safety of the Loch Earn depended entirely upon the col- lision bulkhead. The officers and crew of the Loch Earn all agree in denouncing the con- duct of some of the officers and crew of the steamer as very discreditable. Captain Robertson says that none of the officers of the steamer bore any traces of having been overboard. The French officers walked the deck of the Loch Earn, while both their boats remained alongside. It was only after long and fierce remonstrance of the mate of the Loch Earn threatening to fire on the boats' crewf that any attempt was made to assist. Eventually a French boat was seized and manned by an English crew, and pulled to the wreckage. Vn-LE DU HAVRE.—It appears that the Ville du Havre, the steamer lost in the Atlantic, was changed from a paddle to a screw steamer in Messrs. Lesslieand Co.'s iron shipbuilding yard at Hebburn, on the Tyne, last year, and that she was handed over to the Compagnie Generale Transat- lantique on the 8th of March last; but it has not been mentioned that she was re-engined at the same time by Messrs. Maudaley, Field, and Co., of London. Messrs. Lesslie also lengthened the Ville du Havre 30ft. amidships. Two other large steamers belonging to the same firm are under- going the same changes at Messrs. Lesslie's works on the Tyne; one is nearly ready for sea, and the other has been lengthened, and is about ready to be brought out of dock and fitted out. Three or four screw steamers have been run into amidships in the North Sea within the past three years, and they all foundered about the same time after they were struck as the Ville du Havre, except one, a new steamer, which was out from the Tyne on a trial trip, with a numerous pleasure party aboard. There would probably have been a fearful loss of life on that occasion but for the presence of mind of the captain of the vessel which ran into the new boat. He kept his vessel with her bows in the side of the sinking ship, propelling easily ahead, until every one was got aboard his own ship, when he drew out, and the new steamer sank instantly. The fact that a screw steamer is likely to founder in a few minutes after another vessel has run stem into her amidships is another reason, in the opinion of practical men, why she should never cross the bows of a sailing vessel, as the Ville du Havre attempted to do, with such fatal results, but pass under her stern. The officers of the Ville du Havre spent a a few pleasant days in visiting the houses of several families in Tyneside while their vessel was being got ready in the Spring of this year, and they were looked upon as belonging to an intelli- gent and highly respectable class of seamen, the captain especially so.

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BliEAGH OF PROMISE.I

MURDEROUS ASSAULT BY A GIRL.

----. SERIOUS CHARGE AGAINST…

.. GREAT COMPENSATION CASE.

THE ALLEGED OUTRAGE-BY THE…

ICOLLISION WITH A TROOP SHIP.

FATAL NEGLECT OF A PAUPER.,

THE CHARGE OF ATTEMPTED ARSON…

ADULTERATION OF TEA.'

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MURDER IN COUNTY MAYO.

SE SOLICITOR-GENERAL AND HIS…

MURDER OF ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARIES…

I? V L O N G E V I T Y.

.. A PRIMA DONNA IN ST. PETERSBURG.

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!ITHE ASHANTEE WAR.

A NEW ftODE OF PREVENTING…

. MORE RAILWAY COLLISIONS.

THE BANK RATE OF DISCOUNT.

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I THE "LONG FIRM" AT STOKE-ON-TRENT.

THE ALLEGED MURDER AT RHYL.

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