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THE CALAMITOUS ACCIDENT AT…

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DESTRUCTIVE FluE AND Loss OF THREE LIVES.- On Thursday morning, between the hours of one and two o clock, a destructive fire broke out in London passage, a veiy narrow thoroughfare, leading from Wbitecross-street to Golden lane, St. Luxe's, which terminated with the loss of three lives. Tho premises were in the occupation of Mr. Charles Wrench, cane-dres>er, are situated in a densely-crowrled neighbourhood of poor persons, who at the time of the outbreak were soundly steepin". The scene that presented itself was heartrending, and women rushing from their houses undressed, with their children in their arms. On coming down stairs Mr. rench found the back room in one mass of flame, through which be rushed into t e court, leaving the door open tbe «iud carried the flames up the staircase, and rendered the escape of the other inmates impossible. Ag. o l supply of water having been procured vast streams were t: rown into the premises, but the fire was not subdued un' ill the house was entirely gutted. As soon as the tire was suffi- ciently abated, Engineers Baylis and Robbins went in search of the missing persons, when they foun Mrs Elizabeth Wrench, sitting on a box in the front room with her arm partly out of the window, and her child Eliza Wrench, aged seven mouths, on her arm. Tiie eldest boy, Charles Wrench, age-luiue years, was found in the first-floor back rOOin, up in the comer, burnt to a cinder. The e iuse of the fire is unknown. CHRISTMAS RLVEL.—The Christmas revel at Aston Hall drew together a numerous and festive company on Monday evening, the whole of the tickets for tint occa- sion being disposed of before noon on Monday. The venerable and pictuesque building bad been gaily, taste- fully, and appropriately decorated with an abundance of mistletoe, holly, and ivy, together with groups of sculp- ture, by Mr. Hollins, ami portraits of Ben Jouson, and of Sir Lister and Lady Holte, and other embellishments. The amusements were preceded by a prologue, written by Mr. J. A. Langlord, aud spoken by Mr. Roe. The sin 'in- of the National Anthem and a number of carols was°fol° lowed by the processiou and installation of the Lord of Misrule, and the carrying in of the Yule Log," Her- nck s well-known song to which the assembly joined iu singing. The proceedings of the evening, which every one present seemed heartily to enjoy, were further euli- veneil by singing, dancing, a charade, and processions with the wassail bowl and boar's head.—MidLmrt Counties Herald. MAJOR Sill. JIAUKY HAVELOCK.—Among the various exploits which have contened honour on the British character during the present insurrection in IuJia, there are few more extraordinary than that which has been recently performed by Major Havelock, the son of the illustrious General whom the nation delights to honour. He accompanied the force under General Douglas to Jugdespore. After some minor skirmishes, six columns converged to shut the enemy in, but they contrived to break through and make their escape, scarcely filing a shot. Their number was computed at 4,500 horse and foot, all old Sepoys and mutineers. On the 18th of October it appeared certain that they were making for the Soane, and it was equally that they were able to get into Beharand to reach Gya the havock committed by them would be fearful. Brigadier Douglas entrusted 200 cavalry to Major Havelock to follow them and check their movements. He started without tents, baggage, followers, or regular sup; lies, and in the course of six days pursued the enemy 200 milts, and with the aid of Colonel Turner's column, had three skirmishes with them, in which upwards of 500 were slaughtered, and the whole body of rebels driven into the Kyrnoie Hills, and the district brought completely into our possession. The chief, Ummcr Singh, escaped capture only through the exhausted state of the horses, of whom more than sixty perished through this tremendous exertion. There are few examples in our military history in India of such I a inarch, under such circumstances, or of such complete succe«»,—TYwej,

SPOILING A SAILOR. |

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BRISTOL MARKET ROOM.

BRISTOL EYE HOSPITAL,

Family Notices

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MOMOUTH.

BBYNMAWR.

Reported Specially for the…

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CARDIFF.

THE nXanunmthshire yierfm.