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TO OOKKJEoPONDJiiNiS.

THE TREDKGAR CATTLE SHOW.

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THE TREDKGAR CATTLE SHOW. THE service rendered to the county of Mon- j mouth by the encouiagement of improved stock I and agricultural pursuits gene.aliy, ty the annual Tredegar exhibition, ia becoming an- nually more manifest; and, indeed, throughout the kingdom, the principle of friendly compe- tition and improvement is progressing. A charge has teen made this year against the Smithfield club, that they persist in adhering to known breeds, and do not encourage crosses, from which the breeders and consumers have derived such immense benefit. Of the im- portance of crossing, no practical man—and, in- deed, no man with ordinary intelligence, who has ever had any information on the subject- can have any doubt. But at the same time, there is an important consideration, which was set forth by the Duke of Richmond, at the dinner of the club alluded to, It has been represented," said his Grace, "that the club de- voted itself too much to the encouragement of the pure breeds. The committee wou.d always be ready to receive any suggestions from farmers with regard to the distribution of prizes. But there was one thing which he hoped the club would never do, viz., repudiate the pure breeds, He had made the same observation a hundred times before -there was nothing new, therefore. in it.-that though crosses paid the tenant farmer best, and he (the Duke) was delighted at seeing the splendid crosses in their show- yard that day, they might nevertheless depend upon it, that they must have men to look a little further than that, and preserve the pure breed to fall back- upon Without pretending to practical knowledge, it doe3 teem to us that these remarks contain the philosophy of the question. Crossing, as an artificial process, is liable to constant deteriora- tion, and to keep crossing itself in its highest efficiency, the maintenance of the pure breeds seems to be essential. That being duly cared for, crossing will be taken advantage of with valuable results. Ihis subject, however, is so important to our breeders, and to the public also, that we will make some quotations from another quarter. The writer of the Times, in his description of the Smithfield Club Show, in advocating higher rewards for crosses, remaiked, Common sense points out that in a show of fat stock, the awards should be made in the interest of the consumer." The describer of the same exhi- bition in Bell's Weekly Messenger meets this writer on his own ground, This," he says, "is exactly the course which the club has adopted." In proof of this, after alluding to the clanger of letting breeding become a matter of chance, he relates a fact. An eminent northern exhibitor was remarking to a large Sussex sheep-breeder, on the inferiority, as he considered, of the little sheep from the south, because they had on them so small a quantity of meat. The southern breeder replied that his shepherd would eat for dinner the whole of the lean on the loin of the largest of those Leicester sheep of which his northern friend was so proud. An animal of each kind (the two as nearly alike as could be judged by inspection) was killed. The Leicester weighed over four- teen stone; but the loin of the latter had actually half a pound more lean upon it than that of the former! Now this," says the writer, is what the consumer requires, viz., a moderate supply of fat, but a large quantity of lean. An except suggestion was made by Mr. Brandreth Gibbs, at the Smithfield din- ner, viz., that, in connection with the successful animals at shows, the process of feeding should be published, so that it might be seen how ex- cellence was to be best attained. When, as at present, economy, combined with reasonably abundant fattening, becomes a national desi- deratum, practical tests of this nature are of great interest. At that very young, but flourishing exhibi- bition, the Midland Cattle Show, while many pure animals were shown, crossing was illus- trated in all its branches, conveying many sug- gestive lessons to breeders. There, too, as at the Smithfield Show, roots, which are ?o im- In zD portant in the feeding of cattle (and grasses), were exhibited in considerable variety. Our readers know what an immense collection of poultry is seen at Birmingham on these occa- sions; and it has been remarked, as showing the great value of such societies, that whereas, at first, good biids were very scarce, it is now a rare thing to find, out of so many, any of an inferior character. One arrangement made by the managers might be usefully imitated at. other shows. By opening in -the evening at a low price, for the benefit of the working classes, an attendance of not less than 8,500 was secuied, to the satisfaction of the visitors, and to the aid of the poor at this ordinarily inclement season.

THE MERLIN'S NOTES OF THE…

MONMOUTHSHIRE RAILWAY AND…

NEWPORT, ABERGA VEN NY, AND…

SOUTH WALES RAIL .v v t TRAFFIC…

THE TREDEGAR HOUNDS

THE MONMOUTHSHIRE HOUNDS

THE LEDBU it Y HOUNDS

INEWPORT POLICE-THURSDAY.

ABERGAVENNY.

ABERCARN.

BLAINA.

PJIS TYPOOJL."

PEMBROKE.

TENBY.

VICTORIA.

ABERDARE.