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WL'OR HUGO ON THE EXECUTION…

PREPARATIONS FOR WAR.

A TABLE OF THE ASSESSED TAXES,…

| AUSTRALIAN LABOUR MARKET.

.AWFUL COLLIERY EXPLOSION…

PAUPER SETTLEMENT AND REMOVAL.

23effro! marit anyhb! I

----CHWECH ENGLYN I'R CRIBDDEILIWR.

GARDEN OPERATIONS, &c.

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GARDEN OPERATIONS, &c. (From the Gardener's Chronicled) THE FLOWER GARDEN AND SHRVBBERIES, Those who have to contend with a stiff soil, will find it greatly improved by being lightly forked over when the sur'ace is crus-.ed by frost; and this will also expose the hiding places o! slugs, as well as pulverise the ground to a greater extent than would otherwise be the case. The hardier kinds of roses should he planted at once, and ihe beds prepared for the tea and other tender sorts It is use- less to expect roses to grow vigorously and blo-n freely la'e in the season, unless they are afforded a deep rich soil; and where necessary it should be made so before planting, always taking care to secure perfect drainage, for the teas, &.tre very inpatient cf stagnant waer at the root. But the great thing to be at'cnded to in connection with this department at present is to provide p!en v of bed- ding-out stock. Every cutting should be pur in before March, and a small surplus stock of everything should be provided. It is possible to root cuttings of bedding stock,, and to have them ready by turning out time, even if they are not got in before the middle, of March; but p'ants hastily got up, and sucdenly cneeked in their g owth. as is necessarily the case when propagation is deferred till late in spring, make a poor figure in the beds for a long time after planting, and in unfavourable seasons an situa- tions are hardly got round in time to cover the beds, before thev are cut off by the autumn frosts. It is of the greatest importance to get the stock rooted early, so as to ailow of getting strong plants without growing titem in a high moitt temperature. KITCHEN GARDEN AND HARDY FRUIT DEPARTMENT. Peas that are above ground shoald have the soil drawn up on each side of them so as to break the wind, and it is a very good practice to apply the stakes, filling up the bot- tom on the windy side with spruce or yew br anches, which form a great protection against cutting winds. Attend to keep ng up a succession, by making a fresh sowing as soon as the last appears above ground. Of all our summer peas, Fairbeard's champion of England is one of the very best in quality, and it should be planted to succeed the early kinds. Parsnips should be sown on deep, rich soil, it not already done and Jerusalem artichokes should also be planted as soon as it can be done. On light, dry soil, onions may now be sown, as may a'so Brussels sprouts, savoys, leeks, parsley, turnips, early born carrots, itttuce. &c. but on stiff, wet soils, the seeds will be better in their papers for j another week or fortnight. Do not neg'ect to introduce proper quantities of seakale, rhubarb, and asparagus, into heat at regular intervals so as to provide a constant supply. COTTAGER'S GARDEN. It is a too common practice with cottagers to deler pru- ning the vine till late in spring, and of all other fruit trees it is the most injured by :ate pruning, for unless the wounds have time to hea!, when the sap begins to flow in spring, the vine bleeds profusely instead of pushing its buds. Those who are fond of flowers should sow a few pots of annuals, which if carefully nursed, keeping them from frost, giving them a sufficient 6upplv of water, and all the light and air possible, will maiie veiy pretty objects in May, and will remain a considerable time in beau'y. In- deed there are few more suitable plants for a co tage win- dow than the nemophilas, &c. If the parsnip brd is not already sown, this should he done the first farourable opportunity. Sow in drills 15 inches apart, on ground that is in good heart, and which has been dug 2 feet deep, but not manured this season. Look over the autumn planted cabbages and make good any deficiencies, then stir the soil between the rows to the depth of 3 or 4 inches. Clean old strawberry beds, and sprinkle a little good rotten manure between the rows, forking it slightly in. Fresh plantations of these may now be made, where this was neglected to be done last August; which is the proper season for the operation.

FAIRS IN FEBRUARY.

ANTHRACITE FOR STEAM PURPOSES.

ICOALS AND COKE.

.IMPORTANT COLLIERY ARBITRATION…

EXPORTATION OF ARMS7~&T~ ROY…

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