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ARIETTE. i

LITTLE BELL.

HOUSE-HUNTING IN "WALES.—1845.

ARAGO.

LORD MANSFIELD AND THE HORSE…

TURNER AND GIRTIN'S PICTURESQUE…

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TURNER AND GIRTIN'S PICTURESQUE VIEWS, Sixty Years Since.—Edited by Thomas Miller.—Thirty En- gravings of the Olden Time. This work contains a collection of plates, engraved in the early and, technically-speaking, hard style, so different as scarcely to be recognised by amateurs, as being by the same art which produces the beautifully soft and delicate engravings in the works of Miller, Goodale, Cousins, Heath, and other of our eminent modern steel engravers: Jthe plates, as a collection of copies from the early productions of Turner's and Girtin's pencils, derive however, considerable interest from that fact, and enable us to see to some extent the nature of the matetials and course of practice and study, which qualified these great men, and more especially the former, to achieve the grand results of his latter years. We cannot but regret that a more complete biography of the modern Claude," was not introduced into the present work: it would have been most welcome and acceptable at this time, when the public are all agog respecting the merit of his various works, and anxious to know something more of a man who left as a legacy to the nation £ 100,000, and a few of his most esteemed pictures (unfortunately in a very deplo- rable condition). We say, a more complete account of the greatest of modern painters would have been a valuable boon to the admirers of the genius of J. M.W. Turner. None but the artist or profound connoisseur can possibly jndge fa- vourably of Turner by the examples, presented to us in the work under notice in fact, it must be admitted and understood, such is not the object of the book; it is rather to shew the early manner and style of Turner and his contemporary Girtin, men who have been justly said to be the originators of the present school of English landscape painters, pre-eminently the first in Europe. It will also assist the reader in tracing the source of the inspiration which time, reflection, and genius enabled Turner to throw into the works which will carry his name down to posterity; proving that patient study and unremitting close observation, were the means of laying the solid foundation of his success in the art. In reading the anecdotes occasionally introduced rela- tive to the penurious habits, and at times, grasping, avari- cious conduct of this great artist, we feel most sincerely for the weakness, and cannot but regret it, as casting a gloomy shade through the otherwise sunny and glorious atmosphere we revel in, when contemplating the genius ,of the man as shewn in his works. The book is very elegantly got up, and is on the whole a most welcome addition to any library or collection of works of art.

AUSTRALIAN LETTER FROM MR.…

ANERCHIAD I EOS CYNLLWYD,…

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE. [