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TO CORRESPONDENTS.

NEWPORT DISPENSARY.

[No title]

TIA Nn OF THE 48TH REGTMENT.

--------- ON.-- - [TO Tll…

THE BAND OF THE 48Tii REGIMENT.

0. TOWN HALL, NEWPORT.—MONDAT.

THE BUDGET.

THE MILITIA BILL.

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THE MILITIA BILL. IT is to be regretted that an amendment in opposition to the second reading of this bill, should have been since the large majority in its favour will greatly puff up a ministry already much too vain and self. confident. It indicates a considerable want of ma- nagement among the Whig party, that they did not ascertain more ot the feeling of at least their own side of the house, before making a motion which, without a good prospect of success, should obviously not have been made at all. Having themselves as- serted the propriety of organizing a militia, and that without delay, they might very well have reserved their objections for the committee. In fact, it was impossible to avoid some imputation of inconsistency in the course which they took and this placed them at a disadvantage. It is true that the ministerial measure differed considerably from their own; still, their objections would have told best in committee; whereas, by opposing the second reading, they ren- dered it eleaily impossible to pass a bill at all this session, should their amendment be carried. Still the government have not so much to rejoice over as they may suppose. It is true that a decisive majo- rity has pronounced for some prompt measure of de- fences, and that in the shape of a militia. But they may yet find themselves defeated on some important points. As to the effect on the country, that may be very different from what ministers and members of parliament, who arc often extremely ignorant respect- ing public opinion, imagine. Undoubtedly there is a general feeling, (however absurd or otherwise), that our defence are not what they should be but the entire subsidence of agitation upon the subject, shows how factitious was the vapouring made a short time ago and as we have oiten said, to any compulsory enlistment there is a deep and general dislike. If, indeed, here were any truth in the assertion of that unscrupulous individual, Mr. Solicitor-general Kelly, that for all the vast quantity of foreign corn imported, an equal amount of home grown has been displaced —there must now be so many thousands of labourers idle, that the whole militia will be readily raised at once from men eager for the bounty. But as no in- telligent person attaches credence to the platitudes of Z, this political Munchausen, we fear that coerced en- rolment must be the ultimate rescrt though we must stiil in fairness, commend the government for first trying voluntary enlistment, which is probably one of the causes why the majority was so large. What we now would earnestly urge, is the proposal of a clause forbidding other than voluntary enlist- ment, which is probably one of the causes why the majority was so large and should that be lost, a re- striction of the age to not more than twenty-three.

NEWPORT CORN, HAY, AND STRAW…

NEWPORT CATTLE MARKET, WEDNESDAY.

RAILWAY INTELLIGENCE.

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