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SEVEN MEN STARVED TO DEATH…

FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE.

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FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. FRANCE. General Canrobert, one of the Military Commissioners on the insurgents, has addressed a second Report to the Presi- dent, in which hf describes the state of the departments of the Centre as being very demoralized, and says that out of 4076 condemned rebels, he has onty been able to pardon 7"27. The Patrie announces that the Minister of Police intends to prosecute all correspondents of foreign newspapers who pro- pagate false intelligence. Tile F at*ie says: The expense of the Budget of 1853, as compared with the receipts, show a deficit of 4,000 000'. but, according to all appearance, our troops will soon cea: e to occupy Italy, and that withdrawal will lead to a dimi'iuuon in the expense uf the war department." The Government has just Interdicted the entry into France of a journal pub ished at Jersey, which although printed in French, has all the appearance of an English paper. M, Fabre has been chosen as counsel to support the case of the Orleans family before the Council of State. The Moniteur du Loiret states that the files in that depart- ment during the first three months of the present year have amounted to 51, of which, 21 are attributed to malevolence; 16;to unknown causes; nine to imprudence; three to negli- gence and two to accident. A general ball was given on Fiiday night, at the Tuileries, by the Prince President. M. de Rayneval is come to Paris to advise with Govern. ment on the subject of diminishing the French army at Rome. ) he Constitutiouuel estimates the decline in the average prices of wheat at about 40c. below the avmages of the previous month. During the late mission of M. Quintin Baucliart, in the Southern Depaitments, be oamined 'he cases of 3,030 prisoners, of whom he set at liberty 1,377, and granted com- mutations to 1,047. ITALY. We learn by accounts from Turin of the 27th ult., that the c!,ief of the ArtiMery had just addressed to the Minis'er of War, a report, relative to the explosion on the previous day, cf the powder magazine of the Bourg Dora, from which we i-nake the following extracts — The powder exploded a' the moment when the workmen were quitting their woik, viz., at a quarter before twelve. The fire began spontaneously in a mixture of b'as ing powder, communicating i self to two magazines, erch contai, ing 5,000 kilogrammes of powder; thence it passed to cases filled with ,2,000 ki'ogrammcs, and thea to 3,000 kilogrammes, spread in the open air. The explosion of the latter set fire to two magazines con- taining tjUHpowd'er and blasting powder, exceeding in quantity 10 000 Kilogrammes. 4i The Duke of Genoa ari-iveii almost imtned alely on the scene of the disaster, and gave all the necessary directions. °, The King, accompanied by the Prince de L'ori^nan, ani- mated by his presence the labourers engaged in suppressing the lire, and exnicating the workmen. Up to the present time 35 ate known to be injured o whom 14 are dead. The most of them we'e crossing the canal on their way to dinner, when the shock threw them down, and they were buried in the ruins of the aJjoi;,ing buildings. P.S The fire has been extinguished. It is now supposed that the victims amount to 300, among them being many of the powder ma,prs and soldiers, whose barracks, situated close by the were overturned and destroyed. A great many of the adjacent houses have been destroyed, and sevpraj received serious damages, the walls being cracked in a fearfu manner. One wing of the hospi al Cantorlergo was ov^r turned, and many of the sick inmates buried in the ruins." PORTUGAL. The Queen of Portugal met with a most favourable recep- tion during her recent provincial tour. Her Maiesty's steamer Dragon has fallen in with a water- logged timber-ship, name unknown, and towed her into Lisbon. She will prove a rich prize. From a signal made by the Dragon, she is supposed to be a ship called the Gilmpr- ston but this is uncerlain, as there is some doubt about one ol the flags in the signal. The Janus and Antelope, with a party of men from the Vengeance, were busily employed at Cape Spartel, saving the Government stores washed ashore from the wreck of the Calne. GERMANY. A telegraphic de3patch from Carlsruhe announces that the iteredtary Grand Duke Prince Louis of Baden, has declared of his own free will that he renounces for ever the tuccession to the Ducal throne in favour 0' his younger brother. The lollowiiig anecdote of the late Grand Duke is worth transcribing: A few nights ago, whilst suffering dreadfully Irom the complaint which, according to all appearances; would prove fatal, he said to his medical altenèanl-" Tell me, deai Strickel, did you ever meet with any one who suf- fered so much as I do ?' iTes,"rep ied the doctor."Ihaw lately attendid a man who is afflicted with precisely the same complaint, and he has only straw to lie upon." Only s'raw eiacula,eo. the benevo'ent prince, ringing the bell over his couch, and telling the servant who entered to send one of the best beds of the palace, and all other necessaries, to the poor man whose address would be given by Dr. Strickel. THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. By the ship Agincourt we have received intelligence from the Cape to the lOlh oJ March. There is no mention of the MegiBra or the Hydra, wi h General Cathcart en board. The Legislative Council had voted J500 towards the relief of the sufferers from the loss of the Birkenhead. Sir Harry Smith was to have taken the Field on the 8th inst. in person. A considerab'e number of Burghers were expected to join. He had heard of his removal, but it had not altered his plans. Lady Smith was making every prepara'ion to leave on the arrival of the governor. "Reports have been received from Mr. Cole, Civil Com- missioner of Albert, dated the 17th instant. They state that the Burgher force under his direction had swept the whole of Tyopo's and Madoor's country, the Indwee river and its kloofs, the neighbourhood of the Bogota, the whole of Zurberg range, and both banks of the T'Somo. Twenty-five Kafirs and eleven Hottentots had been slain among the latter the no- torious Dirk Rabi and 1,000 head of cattle, 300 goats, 40 horses, and 12 stand of arms had been taken. "Lieutenant-Cotone) Eyre's reports reach to the 23d inst. Early on the morning of the 21st he moved in-two divisions on the Gulu mountain—the range which separates the Wolf Valley from the tributaries of Gulu River—aid completely surprised the enemy, capturing 54 head of catile on the sum- mit of the heights, and burning large numbers of huts in the very heart of the dense bush. The enemy, Kafirs and Hot- tentots, fled everywhere as the troops advanced. Immense quantities of cultivation at the sources of the Upper Keis- kamma, &c., were destroyed on the 21st and two following days. Rockets had been used with great effect, spreading terror among the enemy. From the heights of the Gulu, Colonel Eyre had observed. Colonel Michel operating in the Wolf Valley below. The co-operation of these two officers, therefore, has been perfect and most successful. It Reports to the 22d instant have been received from Major Kyle, up to which date the quantity of corn deswoyed by his column was computed at about 10,000 muids. He had met I with no opposition. I Major General Somerset reports that he has destroyed the "hote of the crops of the treacherous Soga, the mnrdeier of the military villagers, and those of others, in the valley of the Chumie, as well as veiy many on that side of the Amatola. Major-General Somerset has moveil to the old Konap j Post, prepara ory to the grand movement 0' expulsion from the Waterkloof to the Kei. 1 he troops of the second division, having completed their labour of devastation, are all ordered to head quarters to Ie equip for the field. Mr. Robert Ainslie reports the spirited repulse of an attack made bv some marauders on his farm. Spring Grove, on the morning of the 19th instant. A number of cattle, sheep, and goats were, in the first instance, driven off the greater part, however, of the former, and the wlio'e of the latter were re- captured, and the skirmish which look place between the captured, and the skirmish which look place between the small party of 13 Burghers and the enemy, 14 of the latter were sla i), and 20 lio!ses and several guns and assegais taken. Mr, Ainslie states, that the enemy did not fight with that spirit of determination which has been hitherto shown by them hut seemed more intent on get ing off with their booty.' Very little ammunition was found in the pouches of the slain." CALIFORNIA.—SACRAMENTO OVERFLOWED. [From the San Francisco Herald, March 15 ] SAORAMKNTO, SUNDAY, MAHCH 7. 1852.—This morning, between the hours of one and two, we were startled by the deep tones of the city alarm bell. 'I lie river, for the last twenty-four hours, had been rising rapidly, and fears were entertained last night that the city would again be inundated. Those fears we'e not unfounded. I he Mayor of the city gave notice that if the levee gave way during the night, the alarm be 1 would announce the fact, and summon the citizens to aid in repairing tile damage. _At two different places the levee failed to withstand the wild and impetuous rush of wator. The water swept agaiIlst it with il"l es;stibJe violence, carrying it along in its mad career, and- spreuding over the low and-, that immediately surround the city. The city bridge on Third street, was swcpt away a few moments alter lie water rushed into the Slough. Several small houses bui t on piles near the S'ough, were carried away, and it is rumourtd Ihat one of them was over- 1 turned. AI)oiit a mile above the ferry, the levee, for a distance of two hundred yards, has been swept away. Between Eleventh and Twelfth-streets, the water is three feet deep. At an early hour this morning, boats were in readiness, and engaged in taking families from houses already inundated. The rain continues to fall with unabated fury. The Mayor has issued a stirring appeal to the citizens calling on them to rally to the rescue. It is presumed from the present high stage of water, the who!e Valley of the Sacramento is overflowed. Vast amounts ot property, is is feared, ha e been swepj away by the flood. All communi-ation with the mines is entirely cut oIr for the present. The mail s'age started for Co'oma yesterday, Utll finding the roads impassab'e, -as comp.plled to return. Colomn was par ially overflowed on Friday morning last, and lie rivei, rising at the rate of six inches an hour. A rumour is rile in this ci'y, that part of Marysville has been swept away. ADDITIONAL PARTICULARS rFrom the Times and Transcript, I uesday. March 9.] The second day of the overflow commenced with no very bright prospects. During the night, the waters had continued to rise, and in the morning they looked very nearly as expan. sive as during he previous flood. It soon became evident, however, t; at the waters were receding, and the ciiizens went early to work to make the sidewalks passable, and were able before noon to present a dry footpath from the Orleans to the S'aeHou-e. j he lower portion of J street, and nearly all the built up part of I and Second-streets, were relieved of their watery incumbrance during the afternoon. On K street, IrOIll Second-street, out and from Fif h street, out on J, the scows, rafts, and various other floating apologies had full play, and certainly presented a most peculiar and lively appearance. The p.esence of ladies in some of the boats, gave additional interest to the scene. No very large individual losses of property are reposed in this city. 'I he merchants'stores have, but in eomparatve y few instances, been readied by the water, and time was afforded in all cases to protect the perishable contents. The life of a single person is not known to have been lost within the city, from any cause connected wiih the inundation. Several deaths hive been reported, but there is no positive evidence of such casualties. On account of the late floods, the entire transit trade of Stockton, Sacramento and Marysville was suddenly stopped ——so much so, that haif loaded teams put back their goods, and many who had ven ured a IeIV miles, were ob iged to re- turn, I his !o:ced each city to rely upon loan consumption, and San Francisco experienced a dull time for a fb'tnight. Although water had fallen very much during the tin days previulls to he sailing of the lennessee, communication stil. remained uncertain. Theliea'th of San Francisco is excellent. We hear of a few cases of sickness occasioiia-ly, but the principal c uses ol comp!ain' arises from ordinary co ds and influenzas. Murders and robberies have of late become alii:i ingly frequent in Cali ornia It has, therefore, been de,, pedient to call the Vigilance Committee into active operation again. There was a prospect of a row, before long, iri Sonorn. 'The Fren h expedition, which left San Francisco a sli n time since, instead 01 being intent on gold discoveries, actually went for the purpose of revolutionizing that country, and establishing an independent government but with no idea of Its ultimately being annexed to the United States. The people of California are very much annoyed at thin, and there is some talk of gettmg up an c.pediiion of 1,000 men (Americans) to go to Sonora. take possession of the country, and supersede the French I' is well known that the inhabitants of that. ountry are anxious to be independent. The diggers have been fortunate, lately, in considerable discoveries ol gold.

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