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Foreign and Colonial Intelligence.

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MONMOUTHSHIRE MIDSUMMER SESSIONS.

«.— To the Editor of the Monmouthshire…

To the Editor of the Monmouthshire…

To the Editor of the Monmouthshire…

CHAPEL AND CHURCH.

LAW OF DEBTOR AND CREDITOR.

ABERGA VENNY-THE CHOLERA.

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ABERGA VENNY-THE CHOLERA. To the Editor of the Monmouthshire Merlin. Sir,—At a time when that alarming visitation cf Providence —the Cholera—is hovering around us, and in some of our neighbouring Towns, carrying its victims by hundreds to the grave, it behoves the authorities on whom the duty devolves, to adopt such precautionary measures as are calculated to preserve our Town from the inroads of this dreadful scourge.— I was glad to hear that a few weeks ago, the Guardians of the poor of this union appointed an inspector of nuisances, at a snlaiy of, I believe, one pound a week and I indulged the hope, that some of the more public and prominent nuisances which infest our thoroughfares, would ere this have been removed but I legret to say, that although the Inspector has beeu spoken to, in reference to that abominable accumulation of lilth at the corner of St. John-street, and directly opposite the residence of Mr. Steele, there it still remajns-a disgusting monument of tbe apathy of our local rulers, and a disgrace to the whole town. Some time ago, the sun of the gentltman above referred to, delivered a very able lecture, and 11Ublished "phamphlel on sanilory reform, and pointed out with much force the injurious tendencies of such heaps of the offscourinc of all things, as that to which I have directed the attention of my fellow tow nsmen. One would have supposed that a gentleman so well acquainted with the noxious exhalations arising from putrescent vegetable and other substan- ces, an-i so deeply versed wilh repaid to the insidious and deadly effects of such effluvia on the human constitution, as Doctor S, Steele undoubtedly is-would have employed Ihe influence with which his professional reputation and his position in society naturally invest him, for the removal of this crying disgiace; especially as it is in the immediate vicinity of his own abode. But so far from this being the oase, 1 have heard it rumouied that a scion of the lllustiious house of Killwork has been inter- rupted and interfered with, whilst removing this filth-oat the instance of certain inhabitants of the town. by a personage not very remotely connected with the gentleman above adverted to. But perhaps I am wrong in insinuating that a charge of incon- sistency might fairly be brought against Doctor Samuel Steele, fur not carrying out into practice the principles he enunciated in hiR lecture, and so auly laid down in his pamphlet. I am aware that he, like many others, is immersed in the duties of his calling, and has very little time to attend to public matters; and, indeed, now that we have a paid public servant, whose duty It is to look alter these matteis, it would be unreasonable to expect private individuals to spend their tune, and to put themselves into collision with their neighbours, to attain an object which ought to be, and must be, secured through the medium of the officers within whosespbere it lies. I take it for granted, that the inspector is armed with sufficient power to enforce the removal of such nuisances as that of which I complain. If he is not, where is the use of paying him twenty shillings a week for doing nothing ? If he is, I call upon the guardians by whom he was appointed, to see that that power ;s put into foice. 1 am infotmed that not only the inhabitants of John-street itself, throw their refuse into the place in question, but also other persons residing in Neville-slteet and High-street; so that, in fact, the spot has become the cesspool and receptacle of the neighbourhood. Now Sir,—my object in writing this letter is this to stir p the inspector to the performance of his duty. Let h.ra ae measures to ascertain who it is that commits these nuts and having discovered them, let him summon them e o Magistrates to be dealt with as the Nuisance Removal Act directs: One or two examples would be sufhcien • I am, sir, yours respectfully,pR Abergavenny, July 11th.

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