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THE FORCE AT MOUNT PROSPECT.

TI.EINFORCEMENTS,

---------THE SOU TH~AM ERIC…

----------------TUIiKEY ~AND"GlTEECE.…

----__---ITHE RUSSIAN ANUE…

IHA] L WAY COLLISION IN !…

A LL:N.\TIC ASYLlDr DESTROYED…

------DEATH OF SI It "HENRY…

GOVERNMENT PROSECUTIONS FOR…

TIlE SNOWBLOCK ON THE SCOTCH…

NEW PO RT -COON TY -co U rrr.

THE PRUDENTIAL ASSURANCE COMPANY.

PERMANENT MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP…

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. MAJOIt PHASER'S ESCAPE.

MAJOR FRASER'S ESCAPE.

DEPARTURE OF GENERAL ROBERTS.

THE SITUATION AT PROSPECT.

! ATTENDED CASUALTY Lisf."""I

G EN. ROBE UTS' APPOINTMENTS^

REPORTED TREACHERY OF THE…

THE PEACE NEGOTIATIONS.

GENERAL ORDER BY Slit E. WOOD.

DOERS RETURNING HOME.

THE POSITION AT POTCHEFSTROOM.

THE REINFORCEMENTS.

DEATH FUM HYDROPHOBIA IN MANCHESTER.

TIIE ASH AN TEE DIFFICULTY.…

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--.-e LOSS OF A VESSEL AND…

LOSS OF A LARGE VESSEL WITH…

THE UMA[tKABLE CHAnGE OF KIDNAPPING.

THE STATE OF IRELAND.

AMERICAN SYMPATHY WITH THE…

THE SOUTH" YORKSHIRE COLLIERS…

'.WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE, --

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WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE, MEETING IN CARDIFF. MR MASON'S RESOLUTION. A public meeting in support of Mr Mason's re- solution to extend the Parliamentary franchise to women householders and ratepayers was held in the Asscmbly-rooma, Town-hall, Cardiff, on Wed- nesday evening. The Mayor of Cardiff (Mr Uses J ones) presided, and he was supported on the platform by the Hev. J. Waite, Mr F. Sonley Johnstone (editor Soulh Wales Daily News), the Rev. W. Watkiss, the Rev. A. Tilly, Miss Jessie Craigen, Miss Helen Blackburn, Mrs Mcllquham, Mr J,W. Manning, Miss Jenner, and Dr Morgan. There was a very large attendance of ladies and gentlemen, the Assembly-room being crowded to the door, every available standing place being occupied. The MAYOR, in opening the proceedings, said he was not an advocate either on one side or the other, not having given the question such serious study as to enable him to arrive at a definite con- clusion. But he felt that if ladies had the courage to come here and advocate their cause themselves, it was no more than common politeness that he should come and preside at the meeting. (Ap- plause.) Letters of apology, the Mayor announced, had been received from Mr J. Batchelor (who was prevented from attending by a pressing engage- ment in Manchester), from Dr. Fiddian, MrW. Sanders, and others. (Applause.) The Rev. J. WAITE proposed the first resolu- tion, which was, That in the opinion of this meeting the Parliamentary franchise should be extended to women who fulfil the qualifications which enable men to vote; and who, in all matters of Siocal Government, have the power to vote." That resolution, said the rev. gentleman, commended itself to his judgment. (Ap- plause.) The movement was to be defended upon two particular and special grounds. One was this—the principle that taxation and repre- sentation ought always to go together. (Applause.) He thought that if women paid the taxes and sustained the burdens of state, they ought to have a voice in the parliamentary representation they ought to have the franchise as parliamentary re- presentation went. (Applause.) Then, again, he supported the movement because the present con- dition of things was very anomolous and un- satisfactory, for now women had a vote at municipal elections though not at parliamentary. (Applause.) Sone of the most intelligent enthusiasm evoked in the recent School Board election at Cardiff had been on the part of women. He moved the resolution upon these simple grounds. (Applause.) Miss JENNER, who seconded the motion, announced that she had received that morning a letter from Sir Edward Reed, saying that he had the greatest pleasure in presenting their petition from Cardiff. Sir Edward was one of their friends. (Applause.) But he was not the only Welsh member of Parliament who was friendly to that movemeut there was their old and staunch friend, Mr Hussey Vivian, M.P., who had done so much for women, and who would continue to do so. no doubt. She protested against anything which hindered or fettered a woman from the performance of her daily duties in life and while her country's laws judged her capable of paying her rates and taxes, so long would she con- sider herself capable of forming an opinion and of exercising her judgment, and agitating the question of having a vote, (Applause.) Miss JESSIE CRAIGEN supported the motion. She did so, she said, first, because it was just, and that which was just was always expedient and right. (Applause.) Where there was any injustice there was a shadow thrown by it as it passed between the heart of man and the righteousness of God, and that shadow was suffering. The exclusion of women from political power was injustice, and the whole state of the law relating to women, which was for the most part barbarous and cruel, threw a shadow of bitter suffering aud injustice. Then again women were getting too educated not to perceive the value of the vote. They wanted votes just as men wanted vote", because they were oppressed by bad laws, and in order that they might for themselves make bad laws better. At election times, the candidate for Par- liamentary honours never called upon her, but the tax-gatherer always did. (Applause). That, she maintained, was not just, and she ought to have a vote. (Applause). Women wauted the Labour Laws amended. When the Consolidated Factory Act was before the House of Commons some time ago, a deputation of working men was received by the Home Secretary, who also re- ceived a deputation from the employers of labour; but when a deputation of working women prepared to go, the then Home Secretary—it was not long before the last general election — would nut receive them, though the great mass of the factory hands were women. If they had a vote in Laucashire and Yorkshire, there would be in Lancashire and Yorkshire something like 80,000 women's votes in that district. Then no Home Secretary would have dared to refuse them. (Loud cheers.) Then, again, there were the laws which related to domestic life. Women were not satisfied with them. They were not satisfied with laws which made the wife so entirely in her hus- band's authority that he could, if he chose, lock her up a close prisoner, as witness the Penge case and its disastrous results. (Applause.) The mar- riage laws, by which women had no right over their own children, required amendment. How had women been treated, in this instance alone, by Parliament ? Why, when the Custody of Infants' Bill was introduced it wast got rid of by a count out, only 19 members being present, and some of these against the measure. (Cries of Shame,") Miss Craigen proceeded to point out that though what they were asking for would only make 800,000 women voter. it would make 12 or 13 millions of women free citizens. (Applause.) She urged that if men did not grant them the rights they demanded, they would drag men down to their level. (Applause and laughter.) She alluded, in passing to some examples of the ignorance of male voters, and urged that the women who were claiming the vote were women of intelligence, with whom a life of sorrow had been their educa- tion. (Applause.) Had they votes they would know very well how to deal with men who refused to amend hard and unjust laws, men who refused to protect the honour of young girls, and who refused to give married women a claim to their oan children. (Applause.) The Rew. W. WATCISS heartily supported the resolution, for he felt in deep sympathy with the movement, believing that they were askiug for nothing that was unjust, and that if their demands were granted that women would help considerably in the choice of representatives, (Applause.) The resolution was put to the meeting, aud carried amid applause. Mr J. W. MANNING proposed the next resolu- tion. as follows "That a petition to the House of Commons based on the previous resolution, be adopted by the meetiilg, signed by the chairman on its behalf, and forwarded by him also a memorial to Sir Edward Reed, thanking him for the support he has given to the Bill to remove the electoral disabilities of women in the House of Commons." The question was one which did not require study, especially by Liberals, who believed that taxation without representation was tyranny and ought to be illegal. (Applause,) He did not think the ladies should be called upoa to give a reason for making their demands, but their op- ponents should be asked to give their reasons why they refused women the parliamentary fran- chise after granting them power to vote at, municipal, school board, and poor law guardinn elections, (Applause.) The measure asked for would do away with injustice, and he thought purify politics. (Applause.) On these grounds, he proposed the resolution he had j list read. (Ap- plause.) Mrs MCILQUHAAI seconded the resolution. She spoke in strong terms of the necessity for altera- tion in the laws affectiug women, and in order to effect that, widows and singlewomen, householders aud ratepayers, should have the parliamentary franchise. She wanted to know what pareutal virtue there was in Englishmen beyond that of Englishwomen, that she should be deprived of any lignt in her own children? (Applause and cries of shame.) In order to show how unjust wero the marriage laws, she mentioned the case of Mrs Agar Eilis, whose husband repudiated a pre- nuptial contract that she should have her daughters educated in the Roman Catholic faitu, and whose repudiation was upheld by the courts of law. Then, again, as to married women s property. There was a case iu which a husband had willed away his wife's property to his mistress and her illegitimate children. # (Loud cries of "lIhame.") She did not believe in the suffrage as a panacea for all the ills womankind was heir to, but she was of opinion that it would elevate who ought to take an interest in politics. (Applause.) For the laws of the past they blamed no one but they did seek to alter these laws, and to prevent, as far as possible, future injustice. (Applause,) Miss ELLEN BLACJCBUKN, who supported the motion, mentioned that Miss Emily Sturge was prevented from attending because of some en- gagement in connection with the Bristol School Board. In the course of her remarks she urged that if the vote gave men more energy and more enterprise, and more individuality, would itnot have the same effect up tn women ? If they deprived women from the power of voting at Parliamentary elections would that deprivation not have a similar effect upon women as upon men ? (Applause.) So long as women were deprived of the vote, so long was there a barrier to the energies of women — (applause) — who now engaged in work thoroughly suited to them under great difficulties they need not labour uuder. (Applause.) The reform was, she affirmed in conclusion, one which would be good for men aud good for women, and for society altogether— a reform in which custom was the only thing against them. (Loud applause.) The Rev. A. TILLY supported the motion. It was, he said, a question as to what would be the practical influence upon the affairs of the country if women had the Parliamentary franchise. Speaking as a Liberal, his own idea was that, as a party, they should suffer a little at first, the ladies being somewhat more Conservative than the gentlemen. (A laugh.) But that was not the question with him. Ti e question was—W. s it right ? He thought no one could answer the question except in the affirmative. (Applause.) But in the long run the whole nation would be greatly improved and benefitted by the adoption of the measure. (Applause.) There were some atrocious laws on the Statute Book, which he haidly dare mention there that evening, which v ould not have been there had women had votes. (Applause.) Then again, he was a temperance man himself, and he felt sure that women would favonr those laws which tended to restrict the temptations to drunkenness which existed now. (Applause.) Iu all matters of truth, and righteousness, and peace, the women of this couutry would be on the side of right and justice. (Applause.) The resolution was put to the meeting and carried unanimously. Miss JEKNEB moved a. vote of thanks to the chairman.. Mr F. SONLEY JOHNSTONE seconded the resolu- tion. He expressed hia sympathy with the move- ment, and said that he did not see why marriage should disfranchise women, for he thought an women who were capable of taking care of their hn&bandtf and bringing up their children were also capable of voting for ft member of Parliament. Politics would then be a aubject not prohibited at the table at home, and la Jiea would take more in&reet in tbam. In thkhe went faicthec thaa the supporters of this movement went. (Applause.) He saw that at present men hold appointments for which they were unsuited, such, for instance, as a School Board inspector inspecting seeing work,. and mentioned instances which had come under his own observation, which showed the importance of having ladies cn School Boards. If, he affirmed, there was a class of society shut out from the vote, that class would suffer. When the people as a body were shut out the laws were not made for the people; when the people obtained the franchise, laws were made for the people. (Applause.) When woman took no interest in public matters laws were made entirely against her, as they were to a certain extent still; but make women electors and then laws v, ould be made for them as well as for others. (Applause.) Some said if women had the Parliamentary vote they would send women to Parliament. What would be the harm in that ? (Loud applause.) The House of Commons would not be any the worse than it was now,at any rate, and he thought women would have a refining influence, aud that there would not then be the coarse language used which he was sorry to say had recently been used in the House. (Loud applause.) But that had nothing to do with the demand now being made, the granting of which would only be, he maintained, a small measure of justice to a long suffering and patient class. (Loud applause.) The vote was carried by acclamation. A similar compliment was paid to the ladies who formed the deputation, and the proceedings terminated er with the singing of "God save the Queen."

CIERLEON ENDOWED SCHOOLS.

rTREFOTIEST ASSAULT CASE.

BISHOP HEDLEY O TIIE JIBLE,'

FEROCIOUS ASSAULT UPON AN…

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