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MR. CHAMBERLAIN. ------.

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MR. CHAMBERLAIN. REPLIES TO HIS CRITICS AT LEEDS Mr. Chamberlain brought his Protection campaign to a conclusion, for the present, by a speech at Leeds on Wednesday. He began by ridiculing tho-M who had SIXyken on the other aide since lie spoke at' Newport. He was not eo much impressed as perhaps he ought to ba with the authority which they carried. It was true that l.1r. Ritchie had called his attention to the fact that there were four ex-Chancellors among them, and that one of them was himself. He (Mr. Chamberlain) had a doubt whether the magnificent robes which the Chancellor of the Exchequer wore upon occasion carried with them all the virtue* and all the wisdom of all his predecessors, He was quite unable, without any disrespect, to accept Mr. Ritchie as a great financial authority because he happened to be under the tuition of the permanent officials of the Treasury for the space of a few months. MR. ASQUITH'S CHALLENGE. Mr. Asquith challenged him (Mr. Chamber- lain) the other day, in a tone of triumph—as if, forsooth, he were a witness and Mr. Asquith were the cross-examining counsel— Mind, sir, you are on your oatii, yes or no." He did not admit Mr. Asquith s right treat him in that fashion. At the same time, hs was willing to answer the question which, with such a flourish of trumpets, Mr. Asquith had addressed to him. Mr. Asquith said, Show me any trade that has been destroyed by the evils of which you are always talking." He (Mr. Chamberlain) did not think he had said that any trade was absolutely destroyed. If Mr. Asquith wanted him to give him a trade of which even no dregs remained, perhaps he might have a difficulty in satis- fying him, but he could give Mr. Asquith trades by the score which had suffered and had ceased to be great tra-dej. He thought we might abate something of our conceit, and take a leaf out from the experience of other nations in these matters. They made tariffs to shut us out. Let us make tariffs. Let us (make a scientific tariff; let us make a tariff if it were possible—and he believed it was— which would not add by one farthing to the burdens of any tax-payer, but which, by the transference of taxes from one shoulder to another, would not only produce the same amount of revenue which would always be necessary for our home expenditure, but which might incidentally do something to develop and to extend our trade. We were told we could not make a scientific tariff, but at any rate tariff reformers were going to try to do it. AN UNOFFICIAL COMMISSION. "I am," said Mr. Chamberlain, "going to make a statement of some importance, as I think it will prove in the future. Under the auspices of the Tariff Reform League, which is the organised representative association of this great movement, we are going to form, we have gone a long way in the direction of forming, a commission—no £ an official commission, but a non-political commis- eion of experts, to consider the condition of our trades and the remedies which are to be found for it. This commission will comprise leading representatives of every particular industry, and of every group of industry. It will comprise representatives of India, of the Crown Colonies, of the self-governing Colonie3. It will invite before it witnesses from every trade, and it will hear all that can be said, not merely in regard to the special interests of any particular trade, but also in regard to the interest of all the other trades which may be in any sense related to it. It is open for them to frame a model tariff. The principle laid down at Glasgow was that we should have a tariff averaging 10 per cent. on manufactures, and that the tariff should be arranged so as to put a higher rate of duty on imports which have the most labour in them. as compared with partly manufactured goods imported, but which do not deprive us of so much emplovment. (Cheers.) AMBASSADOR TO THE COLONIES. What had turned him out of office or dragged him out ot office, what had forced him into the greatest controversy of fighting life? It was the question what was to be the future of the British Empire. That was what he had been thinking of day and night during the last eight years. We were at the parting of the ways. There was not one of all the changes that had taken place since Cobden's days greater than the changed appreciation of Imperial ideas and Imperial Let the country send him (Mr. Chamberlain) as ambassador to the Colonies with roll powers and he was perfectly willing to risk his reputation on being able not merely to satisfy the Colonies, but also to secure from the Colonies equal measure in return. (Cheers.)

DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE.

BRECON RESISTERS' SALE.

SIR W. HAHCOURT. ---.

ITHE SKETTY CHURCHYARD. -

POINT IN LICENSING LAW.

BAD COOKING AND DRINKING.

SUGGESTED NEW THEATH&. -

REGISTRAR-GENERAL'S RETURNS.

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PONTYPRIDD BANKRUPT.

SWANSEA EMPIRE BARS. -

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THE WELSH IN PATAGONIA.

------COLOFN Y CYMRY. I.I