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I FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. 1

THE SOUDAX.

DAEING ACTS OF THE REBELS…

LORD NORTHBUOOK'S MISSION.

THE CHOLERA.j

FURTHER PAINFUL DISCLOSURES.

FRANCE AND MADAGASCAR.

A PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS.

SWITZERLAND AND THE SALVATION…

MEXICAN CONSPIRATORS SHOT.

|TERRIBLE NIHILIST OUTRAGE.…

! GREAT STORM IN PARIS. j

SUICIDE OF A GElnlA SPY IN…

I THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY,I…

THE ARREST OF FRENCH OFFICERS…

ILLNESS OF COUNT MOLTKE.

SUFFOCATION OF SEVENTEEN WORKMEN.

THE ABYSSINIAN ENVOYS AT OSBORNE.

'DEPARTURE OF THE MAORI KING.

THE TENBY BOROUGH RATE.

ALLEGED ASIATIC CHOLEliAj…

THE ROYAL VISIT TO NEWCASTLE.

INSULTING THE BRITISH FLAG.

IRISH .NEWS.I

THE DUBLIN SCANDALS..

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THE DUBLIN SCANDALS.. Chief Superintendent Mallon arrived from London in Dublin on Monday with James Daly and John Saul, who were frequently mentioned in the. scandal cases, and they will be examined at the trials. At the commission (before Baron Dowse) the trial of the prisoners who are charged in connec- tion with what is known as the Dublin scandals was commenced. County-Inspector French, of the Royal Irish Constabulary, was nrst placed in the dock, and indicted with having committed a felony in May, 1883. On the application of his counsel, who st,ated he was not of sound mind, a jury were empanelled to try whether he was competent to plead. The constables who had been pi,ot(lel ing the prisoner before his arrest, and two doctors, swore that in their opinion he was insane; while the three medical men who had been deputed by the Crown to examine him deposed that he was only feig'iing madness.—The jury after a lengthened deliberation, were unable to agree, and were discharged. James Pillar, aged 70, wine merchant, was in- dicted with the same crime. He pleaded guilty, and sentence was deferred. At the Dublin Commission Court on Wed- nesday the trial of Mr. Cornwall, secretary of the General Post Office, was re- sumed. Michael Magrave, a fashionably-dressed young man, was examined, and swore to having seen Clarke and the prisoner together on one occasion. In cross-examination witness said he had no fixed occupation, but was occasionally engaged in theatres. He partially lived on money received for committing offences. He was sent to London by Meiklejohn and Mr. Chance, solicitor, and paid 25- a week. He had interviews in Lon- don with Meiklejohn about the prisoner.—The case against the prisoner having closed, Mr Munroe opened the defence, in which he promised to establish an alibi for the accused, and also to prove by medical testimony that the act alleged by the principal witness was physically impossible. —Sir John Dalyell proved that the prisoner—his brother-in-law—was with him in Scotland at the time the alleged act wn< sworn to have occurred.— Mr. Wiiel^n. President of the College of Surgeons, and Drs. Rawdon, M'Namarn, and Hamilton proved the act was physically impossible.—Mr. Holmes addressed the jury for Mr. Cornwall, and The M'Dermott replied for the Crown.— The jury,after an absence of six minutes, acquitted the prisoner. He was then put back, and will be again put on trial charged with having conspired to procure persons for immoral purposes.

THE HOUSE OF LORDS AND THEI…

VISIT OF LLOYD'S COMMITTEE…

MID-WALES RAILWAY COMPANY.

THE AFFAIRS OF MR. GEORGE…

ICORRESPOND ENCE.

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THE ENGLISH COACHMAN AND11…

ATTEMPT TO POISON AFA-l\11J.;j.…

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