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CURRENT AGRICULTURAL I TOPICS.…

INFLUENZA AMONGST HORSES.

POULTRY NOTES.

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! SOUTH WALES MORTALITY I…

IPENAimr LOCAL BOARD.

I MR. BILLWYN, M.P., ~I 1ON…

PROPOSED HIGHER GRADE SCHOOL…

CARDIFF DISTRIcrr AND PENARTII…

m ALLEN, M.P., AND HISI CONSTITUENTS.…

MONMOUTH WORKING MEN'S CONSERVATIVE…

MAYOR'S BALL AT MONMOUTH.

j ASSAULT ON SIR JOSEPH I…

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ASSAULT ON SIR JOSEPH I SPEARMAN. 1 PROCEEDINGS IN THE POLICE- COURT. CROSS-SUMMONSES. On Friday last Mr. George Staniforth, cutler, of Church-street, Cardiff, appeared at the Cardiff Police Court in answer to a summons charging him with assaulting Sir Joseph Spearman. The pro- secutor did not attend, but his solicitor, Mr. Heard, appeared, his behalf, withdrew the sum- mons. Mr. Staniforth then applied for a summons against the hon. baronet, charging him with an assault; and this summons, together with a cross-summons granted to Sir Joseph, came on for hearing at the Cardiff Police Court on Wednesday. The magistrates present were Mr. R. O. Jones (chairman), Mr. Griffith Phillips, Alderman M'Connochie, Dr. Paine, Alderman Evans, and Colonel Page and there were also on the bench— Mr. F. Stacey, Mr. C. W. Williams (Roath Court), and Mr. H. J. Evans. Mr. Clifton (Bristol) appeared for Mr. Staniforth Mr. Gibbon, barristcr-at-iaw, represented Sir Joseph Spearman. Mr. Clifton, in opening the case, said the facts were very simple, and perhaps it was a case which their worships would have been glad not to have had brought before them. However, Mr. Staniforth felt that an outrage had been committed upon him, any he must come into court to protect himself in the future. In his business as a cutler the complainant dealt in various things pertaining to his trade, and among other things lancets and fleam the latter being a description of lancet for the bleeding of horses. On the day in question Sir Joseph Spearman called at the shop, accompanied by his brother and saw Mrs. Staniforth, whom he asked for a fleam for bleeding a horse. She was struck with the manner of Sir Joseph, and, leaving her son to serve him, she went in to her husband. The son brought out the instrument and showed it to Sir Joseph, but he said that was not what he wanted. Mr. Staniforth then came into the shop to fetch a rule, and a conversation took place between him and Sir Joseph. He said to Sir Joseph, This is the sort of thing you want if it is for bleeding a horse." Sir Joseph replied, I did not say I wanted it to bleed a horse. Mr. Staniforth said, Then I have nothing of the kind—perhaps you want a lancet. I do not deal in them." Mr. Staniforth went back to his private room. Something seemed to have ruffled Sir Joseph, and he said, I insist on Mr. Staniforth coming back and apologising to me." He was informed that Mr. Staniforth was busy, but he said Mr. Staniforth must be drunk, and that he would tell everybody he knew that he had insulted him, and that there was no excuse for his conduct. He then went to the private door, and called out, Staniforth, come forth," or some- thing of that sort. (Laughter.) Mr. Staniforth did eventually come out, and Sir Joseph said to him, I insist on your explaining your conduct, sir." The plaintiff answered, What have I said to you ? If you do not like my shop, there is the door; you may go." That was too much for the baronet; he could not stand that, and he took up his umbrella and struck a blow at Mr. Stani- forth, which fell on his son. Then, with an amount of courage for which he would not have given him credit, he caught hold of the complainant by the collar. Mr. Staniforth said, Hands off; you had better desistand as Sir Joseph would not take his hands off, he put out his foot and pushed him away in a manner he would not attempt to describe. Sir Joseph then ran off, saying that he would fetch a policeman, but no policeman came. Subsequently Mr. Staniforth received a summons, returnable before their worships on Friday, the 2nd inst. Sir Joseph did not appear, but the summons was withdrawn on his behalf, and Mr. Staniforth himself then applied for a summons. An Englishman's house was his castle. He did not know whether there was any difference in regard to a shop to which people were invited, but at any rate in this case Sir Joseph was the aggressor, and he committed the assault. His client was obstructed in his freedom, and he simply put his foot to remove the obstruction. Mr. George Staniforth said that on the 27th of last month, at about 3.30 in the afternoon, he was called to the shop by his wife, who said there was a gentleman there who wanted a lance for bleed- ing a horse. There were two gentlemen in the shop and his son. One of the gentlemen was look- ing at a fleam, and witness remarked that that was the right thing for bleeding horses. The de- fendant said he did not say he wanted anything to bleed horses, and witness said he did not keep lancets, and he did not intend to do so any more. He then picked up a rule, and went into his private room. Shortly afterwards he saw the defendant approaching the door of this room, and he went out. The defendant said he insisted on his explaining his conduct, and witness rephed that he had nothing to explain, and that if he did not like his shop there was the door. Defendant said he would insist on his explaining, saying that witness knew who he was; and witness said he would not apologise. Defendant then took hold of him by the collar, and when he refused to take his hands off witness raised his foot and pushed him away. He did not strike defendant, as he said defendant was not worth hitting—he was not big enough. He did not know who defendant was until he received the summons Cross-examined by Mr. Gibbon He told defen- dant there was the door, and he might go. That was not the way in which he usually treated his customers, and he had never had any altercation in his shop. Lord Tredegar had complained of his conduct, and he had had an altercation with a Mr. Newton, a tailor in Cardiff, but that was outside his shop. It was not true that he had had alterca- tions with Mr. Lewis Bruce, of St. Nicholas, or Mr. H. J. Evans, of the Bank. He did not say he was going to turn the defendant out of his shop, nor take him by the shoulders for that purpose. Mr. Clifton (to witness): You were never at Oxford ? Witness: No. Mr. Clifton: Nor at Brazenose ? Witness: No. Mr. Clifton Then you could never have been considered the most snobbish undergraduate who was there. Mr. Gibbon I suppose after this you will be able tD gin evidence v Mr. Clifton: I know something about the gentleman. Mrs. Staniforth also gave evidence, and said that after her husband went into his private room, the defendant asked her to call her husband to give an explanation of his conduct. She said it would be quite useless, as her husband was very busy. The defendant insisted upon the complainant coming out, and said that he must be drunk. After he had called several times for her husband the defen- dant made the remark that he must be drunk, and that he would tell everybody that there was nothing to excuse Staniforth but a fit of drunkenness." Her husband at length came out, and the defendant asked him if he knew who he was insulting. Her husband answered that he did not know, and that he was no respecter of persons. Witness then described the scene that occurred, and said that the defendant raised an umbrella to strike her husband, but it knocked against the window, and then fell on to her son. Cross-examined: The defendant was nasty and insulting in his manner, and she did not wish her husband to come out t<J him, because she thought he was in liquor. Her husband had a hasty temper, and that was also a reason. George H. Staniforth, son of the plaintiff, gave corroborative evidence. He said the words used by the defendant to his mother were, Call your husband back; I was never treated in such a manner in any shop m Cardiff before." The de- fendant afterwards said that if the coftiplainant did not come out he would break every blasted thing in the shop." William Crooks and a boy named Walsh, in the employ of the plaintiff, deposed to hearing some- one say that if Mr. Staniforth did not come out he would break every blasted thing in the shop. This concluded the case for the complainant. Mr. Gibbon then addressed the court for the defendant. He said that his friend opened with a tremendous flourish of trumpets, but on his own showing that was about the most trumpery case of assault that could be imagined. It had been stated that Mr. Staniforth did not take any proceedings against Sir Joseph because he did not know who he was, which was very unlikely inasmuch as his client had on a previous occasion been in the shop but he had plenty of time after the summons against linn was served to have taken out a cross summons if he had wished to clear his character, as they were now told he did. They had now had witnesses brought before the court to prove absolutely nothing, and he thought their worships would see that if there was any impertinence, it came, not from Sir Joseph, but from Mr. Staniforth, who, on his own showing, was very ready to take offence, and told his customer that if the instrument produced would not do for him he could go. To say the least of it, such conduct was rather remarkable. He must say that if he (the speaker) met with it he would be surprised, and he would want to know how it was the person behaved in that manner. He thought it was very natural that Sir Joseph should have asked Mrs. Staniforth to bring her husband into the shop to explain his conduct; and she, like a prudent woman, did not want to bring him out, because, as she had said in answer to his question, he had got a hasty temper. He thought that was the secret of the whole thing. Mr. Staniforth's temper when he came into the shop was too much for him. He got excited, and hence the scene that occurred. Mr. Gibbon then entered into the de- tails of the case, and argued from the evidence of one of the witnesses that it would have been im- possible for Sir Joseph Spearman to have used his umbrella in the manner stated. Sir Joseph Spearman said he went with his brother into Mr. Staniforth's shop on the day in question and asked for a small pocket lancet for a horse. Mrs. Staniforth went, he supposed, to speak to her husband, and the son produced a lancet with three or four big blades in it. The husband came into the shop, and witness said, Mr. Staniforth, I want a small lancet for a horse." Mr. Staniforth took hold of the instrument in the bov's hand, and said, Oh, this will do to bleed a horse." Witness said he did not want it to bleed a horse, he wanted it for a horse, and Mr. Staniforth then left the shop and said that he had nothing else," if he did not like it he could leave it." Wit- ness said that was extraordinary conduct, that he had never been treated in that manner before in any shop in Cardiff, and he asked Mrs. Staniforth to request her husband to come into the shop to speak to him. She would not do so, and he said that Mr. Staniforth must be drunk. • Mrs. Stani- forth said he was not drunk, but that he was very busy, and that he was irritable. Witness then said he would warn everybody against going into the shop owing to the way in which he was treated and Mrs. Staniforth then went in to her husband. Mr. Staniforth came into the shop, put his hands on the shoulders of witness, and said, I am going to turn vou out of the shop," with which he raised his foot and kicked him in the stomach. His brother took Mr. Staniforth by the throat, and shoved him back, and they then left, the house and went and took out a summons. He did not strike Mr. Staniforth at all, but he raised his right hand to try to defend himself when he was seized by the collar, and his umbrella might then have touched him. His left arm was broken a.t t he elbow joint some years ago, and although IK could use it in the ordinary way it was not strong enough to enable him to hold anybody. He did1 not move towards the door of the private room, and he did not say he would break every blasted thing in the shop." Mr. R. O. Jones: Did you take hold of M Stani- forth by the collar ? Sir Joseph Spearman: I never touched him. Mr. Clifton: Never touched him—never had the design nor the intention of doing so ?—Sir Joseph Spearman: No. Mr. Clifton: Do you mean to say that Mr. Stani- forth kicked you?—Sir Joseph Spearman: I mean to say it would have been a very severe kick if my brother had not taken him by the collar and push".I him back. M. lifton: You called Mr. Staniforth out. Why did not go home if you felt you were insulted? —Sir iosoph Spearman: It would have been the wiser lung to do. Mr. lifton: Did you ask him to apologise?— Sir J oh Spearman: No, I asked him to come out 11 [ might speak to him. MI ¡if ton Had you been to the club that morui'e>' ?—Sir Joseph Spearman: Yes. Mr. lifton May 1, without being impertinent, ask if you had had anything to drink that moriiing ?—Sir Joseph Spearman: Yes, I had a pint of lioht claret at lunch. 1\Ir t'titton: You were not in any way excited ? —Sit Joseph Spearman: Certainly not; and my imprlion is that I said nothing that anybody could fmd fault with in the slightest degree. Spearman gave corroborative evidence, stating that Mr. Staniforth was most rude in his behaviour, and that he was surprised that his brother behaved as calmly as he did in view of the great provocation which he received. The Magistrates then retired, and were absent from court about ten minutes. On their return Mr. R. O. Jones said they had considered the case. They were of opinion that Sir Joseph Spear- man did lIotcommit an assault, and they dismissed the summons against him. With regard to the summons against Mr. Staniforth they were of opinion that he did commit an assault, but they would not have thought it necessarv to inflict a fine if Mr. Staniforth had not used his foot. That was most reprehensible conduct, and if the cir- cumstances had been different—if Mr. Staniforth had found it necessary to use force to put a person out of his shop—he would still have had no right to use his foct. He would, therefore, have to pay a tine of 10s. and the costs.

THE REPRESENTATION OF THE…

LLANELLY RAILWAY AND DOCK…

MERTHYR LOCAL BOARD OF HEALTH.

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:SWANSEA WATCH COMMITTEE,

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