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NEWPORT.

SWANSEA.

BHYNMA WR.

BLAENRHONDDA. |

BLAENAVON.

BRITON FERRY.

BRIDGEND.

I-I ' CWMAVON.I

CHEPSTOW.

DIN AS ISHAF.

FERRYSIDE.

LIANDILO.

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ATAESTEG.

MONMOUTH.

MEKTHYR.

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ST. CLEAR'S.

TALGARTH.

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CARDIFF.

LLANDAFF.

NEWPORT.

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DEATH OF OWAIN A LAW, THE…

ALLEGED INDECENT ASSAULT HY…

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BRKCONSB IRE.

CARMARTHEN.

LLANWONSO SCHOOL nOAHD.

CONSERVATIVE BANQUET ATI LLANELLY.…

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CONSERVATIVE BANQUET AT I LLANELLY. LORD EMLYN ON PUBLIC AFFAIRS. THE HOUSE OF LORDS AND THE NEW PROCEDURE RULES. The first banquet in connection with the newly- formed Conservative Association was held at the Athentpum-hall, Llanelly, on Tuesday. The chair was occupied by Mr. C. W. Mans-jl Lewis, presi- dent of the association, supported by Lord Emlyn, M.P. for the county; Mr. J. T. D. Llewelyn (Swan- sea), Mr. C. E. G. Philipps (Picton Castle, Pem- brokeshire), Mr. T. Jones (Llandovery), Mr. R. Margrave (chairman of committees of the associa- tion), Mr. R. Goring Thomas, Captain Luckraft, Mr. R. Nevill, and the Rev. D. Parry Davies. The room was nicely decorated, and there was a large attendance from the town and neighbourhood. After other toasts, the CHAIRMAN proposed the toast of The Houses of Parliament." Lord EMLYN, who responded, was received with loud cheers on rising. After thanking the com- pany for the hearty reception they had given him, he said that many people were fond of talking of abolishing the House of Lords, but to all such he would say, "What will you put in its place?" Wherever there was any attempt to govern a country by a Legislature such as we possess it had been found necessary to endeavour to do it so as to prevent panic and sudden and violent changes of opinion, and the House of Lords to-day repre- sented the steady and progressive feeling of the country. (Hear, hear.) If they could show him a better House of Lords than the present ono well and good, but until they could tind a better representative body he would say "stick to what you have." With reeard to the House of Lords he would also say that anyone who took the trouble to study the debates of both Houses of Parliament would say that in 99 cases out of 100 the weight of debate, eloquence, argument and skill, were in the Upper House. Lately there had been a great deal said of freedom of speoct). He admitted, as an argument that might be used and pressed, that the majority must have their way. Well, everybody knew that the majority in the end always did get their way. Then they were told that obsti uction had got to such a pitch that it was absolutely necessary to put a stop to it, and to put the regulation of speak- ing in the hands of the majority. It was true there had been obstruction, but who had started it He would like to know how the Treasury Bench could talk about obstruction when they made considerable use of it in 1877,1878. and 1879. Was an alteration in the Procedure Rules necessary then ? He maintained that the Pro- cedure Rules were uncalled for, unnecessary, and unwise. When the Speaker was satisfied that the general sense of the whole House was in favour of stopping a debate and coining to a vote he might then set in motion a certain pro- cedure which, upon the bare msjority of votes, might stop a discussion. That, he held, was a. dangerous power to put in the hands of any Ministry, and if such had been proposed by a Conservative Government he wookl have given his vote against it. When the Conservative Government were in power they had to deal-it was acknowledged they had to deal -with a certain amount of obstruction. What was the result? Why, when the Conservatives endeavoured to undertake some measures to re- form the Rules of Procedure they were opposed. He congratulated the meeting on the rapid strides that had been taken during the last twelve months by the Llanelly Conservative Association. (Cheers.) One strong point made against the Conservatives was that they had no party leader but, they should not make too much fuss about party leaders. The Liberals should remember that Mr. Gladstone was not likely to remain for many years to come at the head of the Liberal party. Let them look a little bit ahead, let them also look a little bit back. In 1880 was there that very happy family in the House of Commons ? Let them remember Mr. Chamberlain, the compiler and founder of the Caucuses in the country. He did not think he was a very docile follower of Lord Harrington. The present Government came into office in the spring of 1880, and they had what was regarded as a strong Cabinet,but no less than three of the Ministers who sat upon the Ministerial bench had resigned within the three years. If that represented the unanimity of the Liberal party he thought the Conservatives might take heart. If they went into figures, and inquired how many seats the Liberals had lost since they came into office in 1830, he thought they would find they had lost more seats in the country in three years than the Conservatives lost during the six years they were in power. That was an example of their strength. (Applause.) Now, when they examined the explanations of the Liberals and their description of their owr. posi- tion, they found it a little faulty, and, therefore, they might doubt a littie biL whether their description of Conservative disorganisation and I weakness was correct. (Laughter and applause.) The noble member then referred to the manner in which the Liberal Government had carried out their programme of peace, retrenchment, and reform. With regard to peace, lie pointed out that they were responsible for the Transvaal peace, which was as black a peace as ever was put on paper. (Hear, hear.) The war was commenced to vindicate the authority of the Crown, and he con- tended that the authority should have been vindi- cated before the sword was sheathed. (Applause.) Thtn' all knew that it was not vindicated. Touching next upon the Egyptian War, he remarked that if the policy of this country had been properly conducted in the early "tages of the Egyptian question not one drop of blood need have been shed, and certainly not one shot need have been fired. The Government ought to have taught Europe that when England put her foot down she meant, to keep it where she put it. Did they teach Europe that ? Was it not too soon after the Transvaal War, in which we sustained three defeats in trying to vindicate the authority I of the Crown, and then giving it rebellious people all they asked for? (Applause.) About re- trenchment he had very littie to say, be- cause there had been absolutely none. (Laughter.) Perhaps to the Liberal mind a doubling of the Income-tax meant economy. If it did, they must believe tnat they had the most economical Government, on the face of the earth. (Renewed laughter.) With respect to reform, as far as he could see, hares and rabbits were the only creatures who had been benefited by the Govern- ment, and they had been almost improved out of fxistence. The Settled Land Act was a very good Act, but, although it had been passed since the Liberal Government came into office, it was framed by Conservatives, and, moreover, it was brought in by Sir Richard Cross. (Hear, hear.) The Bill which the Liberals brought in to amend the Vaccina- tion Acts was the most montrous Bill ever drafted. It provided that if a man had once paid the full fine of 40s. for not vaccinating his child he might go free. (Laughter.) Lord Emlyn then went on to speak of Irish affairs. He said the Government policy in Ireland seemed to be inexplicable. They found the country in comparative peace, comparative quiet, and comparative content. What did they do ? They determined to govern Ireland by remedial legislation. They contended that force was no remedy. Of course, force was a remedy. It was a very pretty phrase, but it was not true. He should like to know what they were rising for in Ireland. Now, they had a very strong ground of •omplaint, for, whereas the present Government found a certain system in operation, when they came in they inaugurated quite another system. They said, "We will not coerce Ireland." But he wi should like to know how many Coercion Bills they had passed since they had been in office. There were one or two lessons which they might learn from their liite leader, Lord Beaconsheld, and the more lessons they learnt the better. No man was more ready to admit when he was defeated than Lord Beacons- field, but no man jumped up again quicker when he was down. Ha had the power of patience and the power to wait. The great lesson which they ought to learn from Lord Beaconsfield was that of patience, and his last words of encouragement to them was to be patient, to work, and to wait.

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