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The following appeared m our Second ) Edition of Saturday last. THE PROPOSED COLLEGE FOR SOUTH WALES. IMPORTAXT PUBLIC MEETING AT SWANSEA. A largely-attended public meeting was held at the Music-hall, Swansea, on Friday afternoon to consider wbat, action should be taker, with refe- rence to the college which the Departmental Com- mittee charged with inquiring into the educa- tional requirements of South Wales suggested should be established somewhere, if possible. Glamorganshire. The Mayor of Swansea (Alderimm Thomas Davies) presided. and f here were on the platform the K »ri of fersey, Mr. H. Hussey Vivian, ,M. rr, j. LI. Dillwyn, M.P., Mr. J. J. Jenk'n?. M P., Ypn. Archdeacon Griffiths. the Revs. J ReQ?, R. D. Wilson, W Williams ^Argyle't. and A. G. Edwards (Llandovery College), Alderman Ford, Alderman Yeo, and Messrs. I. L. Tulloch. F. S. Hishop, J. Thomas (town- •lerk), S. S. H. Horman-Fisher, R. P. Ilr.-nie, and R. Capper. Among the la-rile audience on the floor of the hall were the ReVs. Canon Robinson. E. J. Wolfe, Eli CI<irke, John Lewis {chairman of tha Carmarthen School Board), f. Bioomfield James. J. E. Manning. F. Samuel, S. Higman, E. W. Bolney, E. Thomas, Canon Richards. A. J. -'sitv Messrs. M. B. Williams. J. Glr.shrook, H. Eike, J- Deffett Francis, C. H. Perkins. Philip Rogers, R J. Letcher. T. Freeman, J. Jones, Ebenczer Davis, J, F. Fry. H. A. Chapm* Alderman Thomas. J- Coke" Fowler (stipendiary magistrate), Pr. Griffiths, R. Martin, r. Powell, fir. Rogers. J- E. Stevens.J. D. Thomas, G. B. JBrock, R. G. Cawker, J. Crow Richardson, jun., E. S. Hartland. J. Kuse, Dr. Jabez Thomas, E. Sihbering, and Thos. Cory. The MAYOR, in opening the proceedings, Earl JERSEY, who was received with applause, said it was only natural that he should be very anxious to forward, as far as he possibly could, the foundation of a college for South Wales, ior there was no one connected with South Wales who did not feel the great importance of the sub- ject. The resolution he had the honour to propose wuuld. he felt sure, be readily accepted by j ev •: v..r >'■. not only in that, room but in the whole of Wales. It was as follows:— j That this conference of the inhabitants of the six counties of South Wales entirely approves of the recommendation of the committee appointed to in- quire into the condition of intermediate ,n<1 higher education in Wales that a college should he established in Glamorganshire." When the great labour undertaken by the Commission was borne in mind, and when it was recollected that thev had to ask about 20,000 questions in order to iind out the number of the educational requirements of Wales, it would be conceded that they had a great claim upon our grati- tude. The result 01 their inquiry tended to three points. The lirstwas that the educational requirements of Wales were in need of very great arrangement, and he might say of great recogni- tion on the part of the Government. The second was that any scheme for the improvement of education in "Wales must, in order ro be successful, be of a national character. (Hear, hear.) And, third, that it was most important, in order pro- perly to crown the features of education in Wales, that a college should be created such as that which the cO:1Jmittee recommended to be erected in South Wales—in fact, in Glamor- ganshire. Upon the first, point, he did cot intend to wearv the meeting, because he ceiieved that Mr. Vivian, who had paid great atten- tion to the subject, would speak more in detail upon it; but lie would mention that the result of the inquiries of that committee showed that. whereas, according to ordinary statistics, there ought to have been something like 15,700 children in Wales undergoing higher e!i;(.<\tion, there were at this moment only just over 4-,000. Well. it was evident that this state of affairs required very great improvement. On the point as to the educa- tiun Slaving more of a national character about it, or rather that they should consider the national requirements of Wales in framing a new scheme. he should like to read one sentence out of i their report. It was this:—"The existence.) therefore, of a distinct Welsh nationalitv is, ill UtH. opinion, :1 rea;on for securing within the limits of Walesa system of intermediate and higher education in harmony with the distinctive peculiarities of the country. That was to say, that there should be taken into consideration the habits of the people of Wales, if they wished this educa- tion to be placed on :1. secure basis. for they miaht depend upon it that no system of education would succeed if they could not get the great body of the people to work harmoniously and heartily in its favour. WeB. he should now come to one por- j tion of the report which certainly did affect them very much, and that was the creation of a college in Glamorganshire. There could be j Ill) doubt that the great population of this county and the many industries connected with it, pointed to it as being the proper county m which the college j should be erected. (Applause.) The committee had pointed out, in answer to those many ques- hons. tilat there was really a great desire for im- proved education in this part of the country. There were larae classes who needed higher edu- cation, and who would be only too anxious to obtain it if it. were brought within their means, but at the. present moment they had no opportunity and no means of attaining it. Well, the couÏ- mittee was in favour of giving them partly the means and certainly the opportunity. When he told them that Wales was rather badly as regarded educational endowments, he needed only to point to the fact that whilst England had £ô32.000 per annum Wales and Monmouthshire had only £14.231. He thought that tended to show that to place the education of Wales in a satis- factory position they must go to the Imperial Government for aid. (Applause.) And really Wales would be fully justified in demanding State lid. Ireland had received a very large amount, jf State aid. He found that no less <han £100,000 had been granted to Ire- land for the building of schools and colleges, and Glasgow had received £14-0,000 towards build- ins; its colleges. Therefore, they were not asking anything very extraordinary, and he hoped their request would not be considered in that light. 9f course, it would be impossible to start the college to which the committee had alluded, and to carry it ün, without some aid from the State. The re- port of the committee stated that the pstimates 'or the coming year contained a sum of no less ihan £4-5,000 in aid of Scotch and Irish Universi- ,ies. All they asked was to be placed in the same position as tiiose countries. (Hear, hear.) A great "ienl had been saidand written about the foundation the college. When they read the evidence oaken by the committee, and their report, there üuld be no doubt whatever .that the starting of ,uch a college would be of the very greatest im- portance to the peopie of South Wales. The object. of such a college would be to supple- ment the school education of boys. There were yiany boys who at. 15 or 16 years of age might at Dnce turn to business, but if they had the oppor- tunity of attending a college the parents would be only too glad to give them the opportunity of doing so for two or three years longer, to enable them to learn those subjects which would be most essentiai for them in the career they might have chosen. The students in such a case would be able to choose their own subject. And lie was certain if the town of Swansea were chosen for the locality of such a college it would be of the greatest im- portance to the district, and he might say that the bovs of the whole of this manufacturing district would have the opportunity of studying the various sciencesConnected with the works which were carried on in it, He did not believe there would be any likelihood of such a college being starved 'for want of pupils. He read in the renort that the University College of Bristol, which was very much the same thing as the proposed co1!ege, was in a very flourishing condition. There were something like 500 students, of whom 160 attended during the day, and the rest during the evening. And that was reallv one of the great benefits which would arise from placing a college of this nature in such a populous locality. But it was not only the people living in the town they had to consider. Thev had to go far bevond that. If a college of this nature were to be successful it must be placed in such a position that it would be able to extend its benefits, not to the town only, but to all the dis- tricts surrounding it. In fact, it should be put in such a way that its influence would be spread far and wide into the hills and valleys of their country. (Applause.) What they wanted with regard to the education of the present day was to bring it nearer to the people. That was to say that thoy should look upon it as a neighbour a.nd not as a ¡ stranger dwelling in a. far-off place. He did not believe there was the slightest danger in localising a college of this nature. Certainly the spirit which animated the Welsh people was not one which was likely to fall under evil influences, but it was one for which he believed. if they only tried to fall in with it, and to' meet its wishes, they would have every reason to be thankful. There would be no danger that it would lead to the dis- ruption of the Empire, but' there was every reason to'think that it would lead the Welsh people to realiie the fact that the Government of the Empire was a Government for the good of the whole com- munity, and that it could recognise in every possible way the wants and requirements of the different peoples living in the Empire. He did not think he need say more upon that occasion. Personally, as far as he was concerned, and more especially when he looked at the map which stood before him, he thought the best place for the erection of such a college would be somewhat near the place where he was then stan- ding. (Applause.) He believed the fact of placing it in a centre like Swansea, where thev had not only a large population but varied industries, would be to extend its influence like the rays of the sun over all South Wales. Swansea* was sy of access upon either side, and it was with great pleasure and confidence that he proposed the resolution which he had just read. (LouJ tpplause.) Mr. H. HCSSET YIVIAX, M.P., said he had very great satisfaction in rising to second the resolu- tion which had been proposed so ably by the noble earl, and he joined cordially with his worship the mayor in expressing the feelings of gratification and satisfaction which must, he was sure, pervade the breasts of all when they saw the noble earl coming forward—(applause; and endeavouring to do everything heeculd. to forward the-best interests of the locality in which he was so largely interested. They had long wanted men of high social status to assist them in their endea- vours to keep abreast of the requirements of the a<re. Now, he thought it would be ungrateful, certainly in him, and also in that assembly, if they did not commence their proceedings by expressing their hearty thanks to those gentlemen who had ifevotsd so much time and thought to the investi- gation 0f this most important question. (Hear, hear. ) tie was bound to say that he was opposed to the appointment of Departmental Com- Be investigated this case with very great ~ai tud attention, and it appearea to him to be ç co need tr inYwstigatiua, H feared that a g-eat deif.y would occur, 1 and pc-vlbly that divisions of opinion might anise which would 'make it easy for those who their opponents \11. tht-ir proposal to throw difficulties in the way. He was bound to «av that re ■was entirely wrong. No doufet som" delay h^d oceuived, but he thrught toe lll- vestigations in the report of the committee had ra-i- eriallv strengthened their case. Therefore, he was happy to use the words which he had just i used, artd to repeat that lie tendered—and he j hoped lie tendered on be naif of this meeting— .applause)—their hearty thanks to the committee. The Departmental Committee was presided over by a m3.D. who was probably more capable than any other man in the United Kingdomofpresidingover such an inquiry, f Applause.) ftwasveryremarkable that Lord Aberdare—(applause)—received the greatest portion of his early training and educa- tion in the ancient grammar school of Bishop Gore in that towr. There were many other men, not so eminent, perhaps, but still eminent in their respec- tive ranks c? lite, who owed their education to that most ancient and excellent institution. Well, i he had gone through with the greatest care the j.recommendations of the committee, and he was j hapny to sav that he agreed with them entirely, T lie re was not one exception whicn he had to make. Be had examined them with that j care with which it was his duty to i examine them in order that he might, i o far as possible assist in carrying the recom- mendations, or any Bill founded upon the through the House of Commons. They confirmed entirely the statements which he made to the House" when he originally brought the question forward. rnfortunntely it was very difficult to exaggerate the deficiency of educational endow- ments in Wales. As the noble earl had said, the tndowtBents of England amounted mil he believel that wa" simplv ior intermediate education, whilst those of Wales and Monmouthshire amounted to only £U,OOO. The proportion, taking the populations as a test, was not one-third—that was, the English enjoyed three times as much endowments as the Welsh. Well, the result was plain. Yery few of their young men were able to compete fur civil service appointments. The committee stated that last year not one single candidate came forward to compete for the civil appointments in India from any of the endowed grammar schools of There was provision for 2.84b students in their endowed grammar schools, but, unfortunately, only 1.540 availed themselves of the facilities. Now it was evident, that there was something radically wrong in this state of tilings—something that re- quired to be dealt with by :L lirm nnd strong hand —for, as thev were aware—-those of them. at. any rate, who had read the report—the committee had suggested reasons why their grammar schools were not doing their duty as they ought to do it. They said the schools were, in the main, in the hands of one religious body, and that even where the foun- dations had been opened there was still that suspicion hanging round them which prevented the great body of Weish Non- conformists from availing themselves of those facilities. The cnmittec went on losay that the system by which governors were elected should be changed and, indeed, they dealt practi- eany with the whole question in a manner wl1i.:11 he considered was likely to tend to the very srreatest results. Well, among other things, in the 46th paragraph of their report they touched upon the qustion of Swansea Grammar School, and perhaps he might be permitted to read that paragraph. They said, "The grammar school at Swansea might probably with advantage be reconstituted as a modern science school of the first grade, similar in type to the school at Piggicsworth. in Yorkshire, under the management of the Endowed Schools Commis- sioners." Therefore, they said the school should no longer be continued as a purely classical school, but should move forward to meet the requirements of the ase, and become a school of science. He might, therefore, remark that they had selected Swansea as the proper position for such a school of science. They stated what ought to be the teaching given at such a school,-and in that he entirely coin- cided. Thev said theteachingshonkl be the ordinary source of sound English education, Latin, mathe- matics, applied science, and foreign languages. Now, what thev had to consider was in what way the young men were afterwards to gain their daily bread. They could not gain their daily bread in most cases by a classical education. A classical education might be a luxury for those who were born with silver spoons in their mouths but, most men were not so fortunate as that, so it behoved their parents to consider in what way they could bring them up, so as to enable them to gain an honest livelihood. Weil, he thought that most of them would agree that in a commercial and manufacturing community such as theirs, applied science and foreign langu:1.ges were probably the most impor- tant requirements which any man could attain. Certairrty such W:15 his experience, and if he were asked to which of those studies he owed most, he should have very great difficulty in replying. Un- doubtedly, as a commercial man, he owed most to the foreign languages, but as a J11;lDufaeLl!fer he owed most to his knowledge of applied science. He would say, without hesitation, thnt their first duty was to I endeavour to train their young men in applied science and foreign languages. Mathematics were of the utmost im- portance, especially Euclid, because it taught a man to-reason and to reason accurately. if he were to tell them what fault he had found most prevalent amongthe young men Î1t' had come in con- tact with as agents and others he should say it was that, they jumped to conclusions without careful reasoning. Now, nothing taught a man the abso- lute necessity of close reasoning so much as mathe- matics. Well, if they wanted to establish schools for applied science and for foreign languages— but especially for applied science—he did not be- lieve there was any place iu the United Kingdom, possibly he might go further, and say in the world, which was so suitable as Swansea. (Loud ap- plause.) Now there was this grave question always attending the starting of any new schemes—they could not be carried out without money. Their neighbours at Cardiff had come forward in a most liberal manner. They had put. down their thousands. and the noble Marquess of Bute, with his accustomed liberality, had come forward and put down the vety large sum of £10,000 to provide for the establishment of the proposed college at Cardiff. Now, certainly the committee recognised the pos- sbility of voluntary subscriptions being given in aid of the schemes which they had recommended, but they had laid down a much broader, and, in his opinion, a much more practical scheme than that. They suggested that the funds requisite, whatever they might be, to carry out whatever was necessary to provide for the educational facilities for the young mén of the Principality should be provided partially by rates and partially by a Government grant. Now, if they affirmed the resolution which the noble earl had proposed, and which he was now seconding, they would be-and he did not wish to disguise it fro them in any wy-they would be aifirming that proposition of the committee. They would each of them who put up his hands in favour of the resolution, pledge themselves to provide the funds requisite, whatever they might be. in precisely the same manner as their Cardiff neighbours had done. If they were not prepared to do that they should vote against the resolution. (Laughter.) If they were, he said they provided for carrying them out in a much more efficient manner than by the fitful aid of personal voluntary subscriptions. That was a question which was largely canvassed by the Departmental Committee. Lord Emlyn differed somewhat from his colleagues in regard to the rate, but he was prepared to accept a rate as a portion of the money necessary to provide for I the carrying out, of the scheme which they had re- commended. No doubt they were very heavily rated already, but the late Sir Hugh Owen. than whom no one had done more for education in Wales —(applause)—and to whom the hearty and deep thanks of all Welshmen were due—had a scheme to provide the requisite funds by a small county rate extending over the whole of Wales, and he calcula- ted that to provide £100,000 only two-elevenths of a Id. in the £ was required, supposing the sum were borrowed on the principle of a 50 years' re- payment. Well, that came to about Is. 6d. for every £100 per annum. Therefore, it would be plain that the burden would be an extremely light one, and if they were able to provide sound edu- cation of an intermediate character and of the higher class for the rising generation for so trifling a sum he was quite sure no Welshman would refuse his aid. That would be a. much broader and larger scheme than the mere fitful aid supplied by voluntary subscriptions given when the mind was in an excited state, and which would by and by fall away. The committee reported that the middle-class ratepayers were already beginning to complain that they were called upon to subscribe largely towards the education of those who were beneath them in the sac-hI scale, and that they received no corresponding advantages. He thought that indi- cated that the time had come when the whole, question ot education, from the elementary stage —say to the age ot twelve—the intermediate stage, from twelve to sixteen, and the period of higher 0ducation, whieh was onwards from sixteen to twenty, would require to be thoroughly remo- delled and reorganised. For his own pa.rt he should inf.nitely prefer a general scheme by which some small rate should be levied over the whole property of the Principality of Wales, in order to ensure such a scheme being enduring and properly carried out, to any attempt to meet the case bv voluntary efforts/however liberal they might bé. (Applause.) When he said upon the whole property Principality, he used the word advisedly. He thought the system upon which rating had proceeded up to the present time was an unjust one. As his hearers were aware rating was fixed upon those who paid. and not upon those who received. When a landlord granted a lease he fixed upon the tenant the onus or burden of paying any rates which might be imposed upon him by Parliament, and Parliament, went on fixing the burdens upon ratepayers without very much consideration te onus which thev imposed upon these ratepay ers. In his opinion "the burden ought to fall upon the owner of the property and not upon the tenant. He did not for a moment mean to say that it a landlord granted a good lease for which he received £2. and upon which a man built a. house worth £50 a year, that the landlord should be rated upon dE50 a year instead of upon the £2. But when a man owned a house worth JE50 a year he was the proper person to pay, and not the tenant. It was otherwise, however, throughout the length atid breadth of the land, as regarded farming leases and contracts of every kind. That was why such an outcry amongst farmers against the injus- tice of rating was raised. He hoped he would be fr,rgi"en for mentioning such a natter at that meeting' but when he was suggestingfurther rates he wished to guard himself as to what the inci- dence of that rating was to be. Then came the question of the education of girl8. As regarded that it had been shown that the endowments were even lower than in the ca3e of boys' schools, a.nd it would be found that ill the general scheme the committee had dealt with the matter in a very effective and broad spirit. He I was not one of those who advocated a high classical and mathematical, or even scientific, edu- cation for girls. He thought that would b** taking them out of their functions. But so far good 1 sound English education was concerned, tiie elevation of the mind by refinement, the pro- moters of this movement would, even from a | seltish point of view, be doing their duty by striv- ing their best to educate the rising genera- tion of our women. (Applause.) It should be remembered that the woman trained the child. She had more influence over the child in its early years than the father, and it wculd be found in ail" countries where the women were debased that the men were debased also. The Commission touched very effectively upon the question of exhibitions, for the purpose of enabling those who were clever, who were endowed with the highest gifts, to pass from the elementary school to the intermediate school, and from the intermediate school to the higher college. That, he thought, a very important question, and it would be found to have been very ably dealt with in the report of the committee." Then came the question of higher education. As regarded that. the com- mittee recommended that a college—not a university—of the character of the provincial I colleges recently established in England—should be provided for South Wales, and that it should be within the County of Glamorgan. Earl Jersey had given statistics in regard to the amount granted to Ireland and Scotland for colleges, and he (Mr. Yivian) would not repeat them. He brought them forward in the House of Commons, and said "If you grant, these large sums to Ireland and Scot- land, upon what ground can you refuse them to I Wales?" (Applause.) He believed he had proved beyond all mft tiner of doubt that the Welsh had as dis- tinct, and possibly a more distinct nationality than those'of Ireland and Scotland,and he aiso showed that they were as loval and true. He could not belietc that the Government would make any difficulty about the granting of such reasonable sums as might be required, not to meet entirely, but to assist largely in the provision of intermediate and higher educational means in the Prihcipality of Wales. As regarded the locality of the college, it was to be built in Glamorganshire. The meeting would readily understand that, as a son of tiie soil, his preferences undoubtedly lay with Swansea. I (Hear, hear.) lie had already touched upon this question. The committee, in his opinion, were a little wanting in backbone when they hesitated between the two rival towns. (Hear, hear.) They were eaniul awav in regard to intermediate schools. They could not respect, the enormous prepon- derance-of claims on the part of Swansea, and they reCOillIDBndedtha t the chief science sehoul should be established at Swansea. But were they going to divorce the science college from the science school? Were they to have a science school at Swansea and a science college at Cardiff ? He thought not. If he had the carrying out of ;1 scheme or that kind. and W8l'e he called upon to make it a thorough success, he should say graft the one upon the other. There was a magnificent piece of ground already available for the purpose—such a site as he hardly knew of in the whole world. (Applause.) If advantage were taken of that, and the college established there, it would be the best thing which could be recommended. He did not say so selfishly, because he hardly knew that special good would accrue to the town from having a college established in it. No doubt it was an honourable tiling to have an institution of that sort. No doubt the parents of many children would find it much easier and cheaper to take their boys to college, so Song as they could live at home, than it would be if they had to send them away a distance. He could quite understand that; but what they had to look to was the selection of the best place for the whole of South Wales. (Hear, hear.) Would a man living in Pembroke- shire, Carmarthenshire, or Cardiganshire consider Swansea as a central place to which he could It was the foens for three great railways which ran into the town. They ramified from there to the north and west and east, and rendered it easy of access to the whole of South Wales. Without desiring to im- peach or say anything to depreciate the surroun- dings of Cardiff, he expressed the belief that, as a residential town, there were few places on the habitable globe where he, at. all events, would like so much to live. (Applause.) It was necessary to take a particular view. and he believed that the noble earl at the head of the department would take a particular view of that matter. There was one point upon which the committee had been strong in all their recommendations, and every Welshman would agree with them—namely, that the proposed college should be wholly unsecrarian. He felt sure the ladies and gentlemen present would agree with him-that Swansea fulfilled that condition in a high degree. He thought they were absolutely in accord with the great, body of the Protestant Churchmen and Protestant Noncon- formists of South Wales. He was sure that no Nonconformist parent would imagine for a single instant that his child would be exposed at Swansea to any influence to which he could in an way object. (Hear, hear.) That was a very important matter indeed, for it was certain that nothing would cause the scheme to collapse and break up so rapidly as any suspicion tiiat any influence adverse to the religious feelings of the parent could possibly be brought to bear upon their children. The subject which the meeting had been called to consider was one very near his heart. He took the deepest, interest in it, and the people of Swansea might depend that in Parliament and out of Parliament he would always do his very best to further the Cause-not of the placing of the college in any particular locality, but to-further the cause of intermediate and higher education in the Principality of Wales. (Loud applause.) The Rev. A. G. EDWAUDS said that, as he was not a native of, or dweller in, Swansea, he could not be charged with local bias or parochial patriotism. Indeed, if the outsider were qualified to judge, the discussion had shown no desire to create a jealous rivalry between the two great towns, but rather to set forth with fairness and impartiality commanding claims of Swansea to pe the site of the new college for South Wales. In discussing this question, a clear idea of the work and character of the new college was all important. It was almost certain that the new college would be moulded, more or less, on the model of the Bristol University College, Park College, Sheffield, and Owens College, Manchester, with the additional advantage, as recommended by the Departmental Committee, of having the Lampeter arts degree thrown open to its students. The colleges he had named were, above all things, places of technical and scientific instruction. He included also under this head mathematics, en- gineering, and medicine. These were the popular classes and lectures, and in this case popularity was the best test of usefulness. The history and modern language classes came next, and the classical last, in the order of popu- larity. The success of such a college involved two requisites. First, an adequate population in its immediate neighbourhood secondly, a population which could benefit by such an institution, and whose industries would supply the studenis with those opportunities of practical work which were so indispensable in scientific instruction. Swansea had within a radius of ten miles, Landore, Morriston, Llangvfelach, Llanelly. Neath, and Llansamlet. (Applause.) No town in Wales commanded within so shor-t a radius so large a population. (Loud applause.) For all practical purposes Swansea was as acces- sible to Merthvr, Aberdare, and the Hill district as Cardiff would be. As he had already said, those seeking a classical education could go to Oxford, or to her first, or rather only, daughter of St. David's College, Lampeter. The new University College would, then, have to be solely, or nearly so, responsible for technical and scientific instruction in South Wales. It was a debt due to fairness, to reason, and to common sense that the site selected should be in the most central possible spot for all South Wales, regard only being had to there being in its immediate neighbourhood an adequate population. The youth of Breconshire, Carmarthenshire, Cardiganshire, and Pembrokeshire clahned a share in this new college. Place the college at Cardiff and their share in it would be not much greater than their present share in the Bristol College. (Applause.) Cardi ff, being 4-6 miles from Swansea. 60 miles from Llanelly, 70 miles from Carmarthen, 100 miles from Pembroke, would close the doors of the new college to the mass of South Wales. Swansea, on the other hand, was thoroughly central, and accessible to the counties named and to the whole of South Wales, It did seem to him in the last degree unwise to select for the site of. the new college a town which lay on the utmost verge of South Wales, and which was already itself within easy access of Bristol. (Applause.) Then there remained the people and its industries. Let him here quote as regards the people no less competent a judge than the principal of the Univer- sity College, Bristol. In his evidence before the Departmental Committee, Professor Marshall mentioned Swansea as the site for the now univer- sity college, because it had a larger number of well-to-do residents than any other town in South Wales. He (Mr. Edwards) would quote one more point in Professor Marshall's evidence. The pro- fessor attributed the success of their engineering department to the willingness of the manufac- turers to receive the students into their works, and he. mentioned that an emi- nent London engineer recommended the Bristol College because of this arrangement. No town in South Wales could offer such advan- tages in this respect as Swansea, described bv an independent authority as the metallurgical capital of Great Britain. Swansea could give the mining engineer in the new college a wide and ready field of practical training, and to the students of the chemical laboratory it could offer the most advantages. (Applause.) In no metallurgical process was them more need for skilled labour than in copper smelting, and no process gave the technical chemist in general a more varied and instructive field of practical illustra- tion and study. This applied equally to the ex- traction of all the products associated in the ore with copper. And, again, assuming that the medical department in the new college would be an important one, let them remember the immense advantages offered to the students in the way of clinical lectures by such a well-appointed estab- lishment, as the Swansea Hospital. (Applause.) These facts constituted the best of all appeals to the wealty men of this district. Looked at from the most utilitarian point of view the new college would be a great boon to all. If the industries of England were to be elbowed out of the markets of the world it would be because they neglected techni- cal scientific instruction, and, unlike America. and the Continent, lacked that unflagging inventive power which is always substituting for the old, the slow, and the dear, the new, the quick, and the cheap process. Such a college placed in so central a place as Swansea, appealed, not only to that neighbourhood; hut to the whole of South Wales. (Applause) He felt sure that wealthy men throughout South Wales would respond to the appeal for so national an object. And if he might take ground higher than the utilitarian, he would say that all believed that a man's condition was made by a man's own mind, and that it was to education that the states- man and the philanthropist alike looked for that refinement, that culture, and that taste which would ensure the true and last- ing progress of the community. (Loud applause.) Tne resolution was then put, and carried by acclamation. Mr. L. L. JjrLLWY. M.P., said that the nobleman and gentlemen who preceded him had set forth ably, and fully, and conclusively, what seemed to him a self- I evident proposition—that Swansea was the proper I place for the proposed coHegnd b did not. think he could add anything to their argu- ments. He had, however, been asked to prepare a resolution, which read as foliows:- That as, in the opinion of the Departmental Com- mittee, the college to be established should be adapted (as regards the course of instruction given) to the particular circumstances of the country, and that the more practical the educa- tion, and the more it takes account of the require- ments of commercial or professional life, the more will it be in demand, this conference, being fully satisfied of the central position of Swansea, and of its convenient railway communica- tion with ull the counties and principal towns of South Wales, expresses its conviction that Swansea, being the chief seat of the copper and tin-plate trades, and having within its neighbourhood extensive works for the treat- ment and manufacture of tiie metalliferous ores and metals respectively, is able to afford better practical and technical instruction in all the varied industries in which the people of South Walss are so largely engaged, than any other town, and is, therefore, the best site for the locality of the proposed college." The proposition was one which he had the greatest pleasure and satisfaction in submitting, not be- cause he was an inhabitant of Swansea, not be- cause he was the representative of Swansea, not because of any preference he had for Swansea, but because his firm conviction was that if there were to be a University College for South Wales Swansea was the proper place for it. He would only add one argument to those adduced by the gentlemen who had already spoken. It was that the question whether there was to be a University Coilege in South Wales or not hung upon where it was to ba. He had some objections to vote for State aid, and the only ground which would, to his mind, justify such a plan would be that the college to which that aid was to be given should be situated in the best possible place in the country where tile rate was to be raised. (Hear. hear.) He felt sure that if it were established in so out of the way a place as Cardiff—the extreme corner of Wales—the feeling against a rate being raised for its maintenance would be very general and very bitter. If ha considered that an equally suitable town to Swansea could be found in Glamorganshire he would sink his preference. Had Carmarthen, for instance, been rf commended as the site of the college, and were it proposed that money should be voted by the (tovernmentorarate levied for the maintenance of the institution there, he would, all things being equal, have supported the suggest ion. Carmarthen", however, did not present the same advantages as Swansea. He did not draw these comparisons from any desire to disparage Cardiff. His efforts had always been directed towards making the Welsh as English as possible, while at the same time they retained their nationality. He wished them to participate in and derive all the advantages of an English education, but he did not think it advisable that the new collego should be estab- lished at a place so far removed from the central districts of Wales as Cardiff. (Hear, hear.) Mr. JOHN JONES JENKINS, M.P., said he thought it had been so conclusively shown bv previous speakers where the site of the college ought to be located that he should be only wasting time were he again to go over the argu- ments adduced in behalf of Swansea. He should confine his remarks principally to the circular issued from Cardiff. Since a college for South Wales had been spoken of, he had always given the preference to Swansea. He mentioned that, when lie had the honour of giving evidence before the Departmental Committee when they w held their inquiry at Swansea, lie submitted to them iiis views. He believed in technically applying the knowledge obtained at college, and there was no place in Wales where that knowledge could be more beneficially applied than Swansea. (Hear, hear.) There was no place in South Wales where the in- dustries were so varied as in its immediate neigh- bourhood. Looking over the figures in the circular issued under the authority of the Mayor of Cardiff, and carefully comparing thenl with other statistics, he found that they were not altogether in accord with certain statistical state- ments he had been able to lay his hands upon. In the first place, he would remark that the area of Cardiff was 81,754 acres, whereas the acreage of Swansea was only 25,686, so that the acreage of Swansea was not equal to one-third that of Cardiff. Consequently, when a. comparison was drawn as to the population in each district, it was not drawn upon a fair basis. If the same area round Swan- sea as round Cardiff were taken, a totally different state of things would be arrived at from what was conveyed in the circular referred to. If in the Swansea district were included, not only the 25,000 acres comprised in the municipal boundary, but an area similar to that of Cardiff, it would be seen that the population of Swansea was not 63,000,as stated in the circular, but 128,842. Swan- sea proper had an acreage of 25,696 acres, with a population of 95,068 Gower had an acreage of 21,858 acres, and a population of 8,250; Neath had an acreage of 20,183 acres, and a population of 21,524, and the one-fifth of Pontar- dawe, which would be included, had an acreage of 13,000 acres and a population of 4,000, making a total acreage of 80,737 acres and a total population of 128,842—exceeding Cardiff by over 22,000, or 5 percent. I" Hear, hear," and applause.) Looking to the map it would be observed that Swansea was more accessible to all the counties to the wet of the line. People from these counties naturally came to Swansea instead of going to Cardiff, the increased distance to the latter place representing two or three hours' journey. That, he took it, was un- doubtedly a consideration, and a great one to the class of students whom the proposed college was intended to benefit. (Applause.) With regard to the question of subsciptions, the people of Swansea wished to know, first of all, what the intention of the Government was in regard to tho matter, and whether they expected the inhabitants of the town in which it was proposed to locate the col- lege to contribute a large sum of money. If they did he had no doubt that the noble example set that. day by the high-sheriff would be followed by other gentlemen in Swansea, and there would be no lack of funds. (Applause.) Alderman Y.EO supported the resolution. He said that the manifesto issued from Cardiff was a document remarkable for its inaccuracy, audacity, and ingenuity. It appeared to him to furnish another iliustrsiaon of the truth of the remark so often heard, that statistics judiciously manipulated might be made to prove anything. He had no doubt that the gentleman who prepared that document with the signature of the mayor of Cardiff \yould be quite capable, if occasion required it, to prove, not only that Cardiff was conveniently and centrally situated to benefit the inhabitants of South Wales, but that Land's End was in the centre of the United Kingdom. The Rev. EDWARD DAVIES urged the claims of Swansea as being more of a Welsh town than Cardiff. The resolution was then put and carried. Archdeacon < TRIFFITHS then moved That this conference tenders its thanks to the corporation of Swansea for their munificent offer of a site for the proposed college, and undertakes, in the event of the Gbvernment requiring the buildings and appliances of the college to be provided by local effort, to do all in its power to raise a fund suffi- cient for so doing." Dr. RF.ES seconded the resolution, which was carried. A vote of thanks to the mayor for presiding ter- minated the proceedings.

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