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, CARDIFF.

j PENARTH.

NEWPORT. !

, tj. CAERLEON.

SWANSEA.

"MERTHYR.

ABERGAVENNY.

BTAENAYON.

BRIDGEND.

BRITON FERRY.

CAERPHILLY.

COWBRIDGE.

FOREST OF DEAN.

- ——— GLYNTAFF.',,"."

II AVERFORL >WEST.

LLANELLY.

LLANGiNNEOH.

MAESTEG.

MACIIEN.

___ V MAESYCWMMER.

MONMOUTH.

NARBERTII.

NEATH.

NEWCASTLE EMLYN.

PENCLAWDD.

PONTYPRIDD.

PONTYCYMMER.

TREFOREST.

[No title]

CARDIFF.

LLANDAFF.

PENARTH.

NEWPORT.

SWANSEA.

MERTHYR.

-"' ABERDARE.

ABERGAVENNY".

LLANELLY.

PONTYPRIDD.

TENBY.

TREDEGAR.

1 COUNTY COUKTS. I-

.CARDIFF BOARD OF GUARDIANS.

NEWPORT BOARD OF GUARDIANS.

MERTIIYR BURIAL BOARD.

[No title]

JCHARGE OT SHEEP STEALING…

--------SERIOUS ASSAULT IX…

HIGHWAY ROBBERY IX CARMARTHENSHIRE.

CARDIFF DISTRICT AXD . PENARTH…

[No title]

ITHE RECENT EXPLOSION AT INORTH…

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I THE RECENT EXPLOSION AT NORTH RlSCA. On Wednesday morning Mr. W. H. Brewer re- sumed the inquiry touching the death of Charles L'ixon, aged 44, one of the overmen of the colliery belonging to the London and South Wales Coal Company, at which an explosion occurred on the morning of Sunday, the 15th of January last, Besides the above-named, three other men— Francis Evans, William (Settings, and William Eea»le—'were also killed. The repairing shift hac been at wc.rk during the night of the 14tl cf January, and when that set of men, numbering about 120", had left the pit, the deceased were let. t-c fire shots for the purpose of removing largt p.t:ces of rock in the leading roadways. It was. after these shots—three or four in all-ha.d been fired that the explosion occurred, killing all four 0; the men engaged in the operation, and about 60 horses. The pit was greatly" knocked about, to use a colloquial phrase but the company has been able to resume the cutting of coal on a smd. scale in some other parts of the colliery. The com party has the fullest sympathy of the public oecause it is known that all possible precaution: have-been taken to ensure safety. On this occasion the court sat at the Churel House Jnn. -Risca. Mr. Edward Edwards was the foreman of the jury. Mr. R D. Bain, deputy* inspector lor the district; Mr. T. Wales, inspectoi for Glamorganshire Mr. Watts, chairman of the. London and South Wales Coal Company: Mr, the secretary: Mr. Wilkinson, the manager Mr. J. E. Ward, the solicitor Mr. S. W. Kelly, Cardiff; Mr. G. Wilkinson, Newport: and a large number of colliers were present. The follow- ing witnesses were examined :— Wiiiiam Alsop. night overman of X o. 2 district, said he was down the pit on the night of Saturday. January 14, at ten. and came up at 5.30 a.m.. 0:1 Sunday. Saw a strong cap in two places, aftid signed the report. The general state of his dis- triot was good. and ventilation going on as usual The four men killed had to remain to fire the shots four or five in number. Charles Dixon. Francis Evans, William Getting-s, and Wiiiiam Beagle Vien the men left, and they were killed. It was cus- tomary to have an open lamp in the lamp cabin. It was put out before he left. The rule was to tire one shot at a time. He coiud not say whether alt the three shots near each other were hred at one and the salDe time, Thomas Purnell. day overman, was down on tht Saturday, and saw the places where the caps were on. As far as he knew. the pit was safe at 10 p.m There vcis plenty of wind going. The roadways were watered every day. Could not form an api. inion as to how the explosion happened. Stephen Crook, day fireman, was down from two to ten p.m. c-n the Saturday, and saw a littlt j gas in one place, which he removed by placing a sheet. His district was well ventilated. David Kenvin, day fireman in :\0. 1 district, said the pit was safe'on the Saturday night. David Lewis, timberman, tried the top when he was at work, but could not detect anv gas. Thought the firing of the shots dislodged part of the roof, and then a blower came oft". Joseph Prichard, collier in o. 1 district., put, up timber on the Saturday, bat saw no symptoms of gas. Thomas Jones, ripping-top man, was down on Saturday night from ten o'clock to five o'clock on Sunday morning. He drilled several holes. One was between Hill and Wrem mere's headings, and was a yard in length. It took him two hours Three cartridges and a primer of dvnaroite were intended to be used. The next was inside No. 2 Three holes were near together, and from 2Q to 24 inches long. Only one would be tired at a time. The inside of the three would be hred first. A fortnight before the explosion he wr.s at the tiring | of a shot between Hill and Wreotmore's heading, After the fuse was lit he went back 30 or 40 yards to a manhole. Felt no concussion. A little liame was caused. Could not say how far the flame would extend. Not much dust was caused when a shot was fired. When shots were fired the touch paper was lit at the lamp station, and then the man carried it to the fuse, The man had a locked lamp with him. Had been down the pit since the explosion. Could not say how it was that one of the three near together had not been fired. The man would have to un- lock his lamp to light the touch paper. The cabin lamp would not be left burning after the lampman Iwd gone. David Brimble, lampman, was on duty on the Saturday night and sw all the lamps safely locked. He cme out at five a.m. on Sunday. Left behind the men to fire the shots. His was the only naked light in the pit. He put his light out before leaving the lamp-room. He ha.d no experience of the process of shot firing. The onlv four lamps left in the pit belonged to the deceased. The lamps were as perfect as before the explosion. The two clean ones were found in the lamp-room. Only Charles Dixon would have a lamp key. That, was for the purpose of firing the shots. The pit was safe when he left. His duty did not take him beyond the lamp station. Ali lamps are examined on the surface before the men go down the pit. to see they are locked. The same thing is done at the three shifts. About 120 lamps went down the last shift. An account is kept of each bmp tbat goes down the pit. Wiiiiam Hayes, lampman on day duty, has charge of the lamps on th2 top. At fWD p.m. on Saturday the four lamps produced were in a proper condition, and. as far as he could say, they were in the same condition DOW. These four were given to the deceased. On the night in question Dixon took 5ibs. of dynamite from the store. That would include fifteen cartridges and the primers. Charles Karnes, col1iel', workin2' in No. 1 district was at work until two a.m. on Saturday. Acteo ¡¡." fireman that night. His district was clear of gas. Could give no idea how the explosion oc curreù. Had no fault to find with the manage ment Had not known of accumulations of gae sin"è" the preyjous explosion. The pit was not subject to severe blowers. There were no sign.* of a blower on the Saturday. Would have seen it if there had been one. Blowers mostly come with falls. The dust was .kept very clean all along the dukcy-road. Henry Hum, Jonah Sage, and Josiah Purnell colliers, gave similar testimony. George Drew, the engine driver for the fan. said the explosion occurred at seven minutes to six o'c1ock on the morning of Sunday. Tile ventila- tion was in good working order that night, and he did not check the fan aT aU. There were from 55 to 57 revolutions per minute. The barometer was hisrh that night. The fan was a guibal, 40ft. bj 72ft. He knew by the report that an explosior had occurred, anfl the debris from the t-op of th* fan fell near to where he was standing. Tilt covering to the upcast shaft was also raised by "t lie explosion. There was no change in the working of the fnn from two p.m. on Saturday until the explosion occurred. The inquiry was then further adjourned until noon Thursday.

FATAL COLLIERY ACCIDENT AT…

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