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BOMBARDMENT,

'3JCRE OF AMKRICAffS tlI ORDEEU,

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LOCAL DIYOECE SUIT.

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TRAGEDY IN AN EDINBURGH HOTEL.

A77DREE EXPEDITIONS.

- EARL'S BROTHER AND HIS ACTRESS…

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EARL'S BROTHER AND HIS ACTRESS WIFE, A PITIFUL CONFESSION. In the Divorce Division on Tuesday afternoon (before Mr. Justice Barnes) the case of Lamb- ton v. Lambton, Pedro Berridge, and Biondi came on for hearing. This was a suit of the Hon. D'Arcy Lambton, a brother of the Earl of Durham, for a dissolution of marriage on the ground of the adultery of his wife, whose maiden name was Florence Ethel Sproule, and was formerly an actress in Australia, with the cc-respandents. Mr. Inderwick, Q.C.. in opening the case, said that the petitioner joined the Royal Navy in 1879, and in 1838, he then being a sub-lieutenant, was with his ship in New South Wales. He there made the acquaintance of the respondent, Florence Ethel Sproule, as she then was, who was engaged at a theatre. He seemed to have become very much attached to her, and in the result, on the 14th of June, 1888, they were married at an English church in Sydney. After- wards they came to this country, and lived together until 1898. At the time they were married she represented that she was a person of good family, that she had some small means of her own, and that she was expecting a considerable accession of property at some future time. They came to England in the early part of 1890. She made various represen- tations as to her family, and that she had come into £ 400 or £ 500 a year, and on the faith of that he introduced her to h:s banker, and opened a private account for her. opened a private account tor her. She afterwards went away to see her mother, who she said was ill, and Mr. Lambton gave her money for that purpose. He himself never had any suspicion of her conduct. She appeared ti have been kind, and to have been attached to him, and he was attached to her. It now appeared that during the whole of the time nearly that she was in England she had been carrying on an adulterous intercourse with one of the co-respondents, Mr. Berridge, whose acquaintance Mr. Lambton had made in Paris in 1892. She had been away, and he had. a letter from her, saying that she had been taken extremely ill, and was in a hotel at Paris. He immediately left England and went to Paris and found his wife staying at the Hotel Continental. She had tried to take poison, and was in a melancholy position. He there made the acquaintance of Mr. Berridge, who said that he was coming from Monte Carlo by the same train with her and others, and that she had been taken ill, and that he had telegraphed for the petitioner and stayed there until he had come. Mr. Berridge had afterwards visited him in England. In the course of the spring of last year it came to Lord Durham's ears that this lady was conducting herself in such a way as to be notorious, and ho thought it his duty to speak to Mr. Lambton, his brother, about it. He (Lord Durham) had the greatest difficulty in persuading Mr. Lambton that anything could be said against his wife. However, he even- tually put himself in his brother's hands, and inquiries were made, and it was found that adultery had been committed with Mr. Berridge. He had, it appeared, taken a house, and used to meet her there. Mr. Lambton then spoke to his wife, and asked her whether it was true or not. She said it was not entirely true, but that some of the information he had about her was true. The next day she left the house. Then she wrote a letter to him, in which she said:—" I have been away all night thinking so uch about this awful business-so much so at I think I shall go mad unless I tell you everything. When you know the full history of a miserable life you will say that I have been punished enough, and, for the sake of Eilien (their child), you will do nothing. The things I will tell you can be proved. I think ten years of misery quite enough punishment. You might despise me, you might pity me, but nothing can matter. But when you read my confession and the truth you will not wonder why I have so often tried to put an end to my life. There is no one to blame but myself, so why should anyone suffer. But I am so sorry for you. daddy. en years ago I began with a lie, but I have suffered for it. I have not very long to live, so don't be harder than you can help. I should like to see the kid again if only for five minutes. If you only knew how much I have been punished. You will pity me when you know all if it is any satisfaction for anyone to know we are really starving." Then came a confession which ran:—"My confession of my guilt is about the greatest punishment of my life. I began by telling you a lie. I told you lies about my birth, because when I married you I was poor, and when I found out that you were better than myself I made things worse by making out that I was much better born than I was. I told yont had money. That was a lie, and I was expecting more when I came of age. Why I should have gone on telling such lies I cannot imagine. I ought to have told you the truth from the first, and, like a coward and a liar, I was vile enough to lie about my own mother. I told lies about Nellie (her sister) because I was jealous of her ,and was afraid of the only man I ever really loved caring for her. There is no excuse for me. I am guilty of nearly all the vile things they say about me. I would, if it were possible, begin a new life somewhere where I was not known. The fraud of my life has made me take to drink. My father was a drunkard. After telling you such lies about money, I had to try and get it somehow. You will understand now why I could never feel at home with your people. I knew what a living lie I was. What with drink and extravagance I have fallen very low. I have not teen true to Berridge, even though it hurt, you very much to say it. I have always respected you, and, perhaps, might have loved yeu. but I knew you would despise my low birth if you knew. If I could only have a chance of being good again I would jump at it. I would give the world to undo what I have done. I am guilty, and there is no more to be said, but do have mercy on me. and let me go away anywhere. I shall go mad if I stay here any longer. I will never tell anybody that I have been your wife." Mr. Inderwick said that Mr. Berridge was a gentleman of means, and had a place in Ireland. In reply to the Judge, he said he proposed only to prove the case against Mr. Berridge, a.nd he did not think it would be necessary to go into the other cases. Mr. Priestley, who appeared for Mr. Berridge, intimated that he would not. contest the suit. The Hon. D'Arcy Lambton then gave evidence in support of counsel's statement. He said that his brother, the Earl of Durham, made a communication to him in reference to the respondent, and that led him to make inquiries and to bring the present suit. Annie Blackman, who had been a servant at a house in Chelsea, said that she had seen Mr. Berridge visit Mrs. Lambton there. He was alone with her in her room. That took place on a number of occasions. His Lordship on this granted the petitioner a decree nii for the dissolution of the mar- riage on the ground of the respondent's adul- tery with Mr. Berridge, with costs, and ordered that the petitioner should have custody of the child of the marriage.

MISSING POLICEMAN FRIOI DOWLAIS.

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