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BOMBARDMENT,

'3JCRE OF AMKRICAffS tlI ORDEEU,

[No title]

LOCAL DIYOECE SUIT.

CABDIFF DROWNING CASE.

RE-CLAIMING INEBRIATES.

------ESCAPED LUNATIC ATTACKS…

-----_---__--SHOCKING TRAGEDY…

ALLEGED FRAUD ON NOBLEMEN.

KMLWAY CRASH IN BELGIUM.".

EXAMINATION OF DREYFUS.

THE; URfUCE: CASE.

ANOTHER, CRISIS IN CHINA,

DEATH AND THE DENIL.

SULTAN OF OMAN OBEYS,

FIGHTING AT IALIEMVAN.

HOOLEY BANKRUPTCY.

"I LOVE MY REGIMENT."

THE YILLAGE TRAGEDY, *

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THE YILLAGE TRAGEDY, ACCUSED COMMITTED FOR TRIAL Miss Peterson was charged at Cranbrook on Tuesday with the murder of John Whibley. Mr. S. Pearce prosecuted, and Mr. C. F. Gill, Q.C., and Mr. H. C. Gollan (instructed by Mr. George Hamilton) defended. The court was packed as prisoner, dressed as on the previous occasion, walked unconcernedly to the dock. She carried a bunch of blue violets and lilies of the valley. Seating herself near the atten- dant, she took n calm, comprehensive survey of the bench, officials, and public, and fre- quently turned to smile at someone in court. In opening the case Mr. Pearce traced Miss Peterson's history and connection with the deceased. He said in 1893 they quarrelled, and the relationship between the parties was strained until 1897. The learned gentleman then read correspondence which had passed between them. In one letter Whibley denied certain imputations against his character, and in the letters written by accused since the crime she stated that "God had told her to do it," and "That He gave her strength to do it." She also said, "She had done something for the sake of little girls, and was quite ready to die." Mr. Whibley, father of deceased, spoke to his son receiving a letter inviting him to go to the school to forgive Miss Peterson. The Rev. W. Craven, curate-in-charge, repeated the evidence given at the inquest, and said that after Whibley fell prisoner appeared quite calm. Witness ran for Afx. Houghton, whilst accused stood looking at the body. Cross-examined: Witness used to live at the Rectory, and he formed the opinion that prisoner was a person of extreme religious views. He considered her somewhat eccentric, and understood she was much interested in the sub- ject of purity, but he had never discussed the cubject with her. Evidence as to the commission of the crime followed. Mr. Houghton said prisoner after- wards gave him the revolver, and a saddler, who detained Miss Peterson, said she told him she had committed the crime to protect little children. She added, "A woman is justified in killing the man, but a little child is not able," Dr. Bate deposed that to his knowledge pri- soner was extremely eccentric, and decidedly emotional. She had expressed to witness's wife great interest in the White Cross League. He could not say she was insane, but she was bordering on it. He knew Mrs. Peterson, prisoner's mother, who was subject to epilepsy, and witness was called in when she died through falling on the fire. Miss Goold, of Nottingham, to whom some of the letters read by counsel were addressed, said she attended an inquiry into the allega- tions made against Whibley, who was ques- tioned by prisoner. Witness took notes, and also asked Whibley some questions. The only persons present at the inquiry were deceased, prisoner, and witness, and towards the end a servant, named Cooper, came in. As the result of the inquiry, letters were written to the Arch- bishop of Canterbury, the rural dean, the churchwarden, and others. Miss Goold said prisoner was quite sincere in all she said and elid, and witness believed her to be affectionate, kind-hearted, and good. Adelaide Oliver, a friend of prisoner's, proved receiving a letter from Miss Peterson, in which she said that Sodom and Gomorrah seemed to hang over Biddenden, as crimes were not punished. Miss Connell, lady superintendent of the Dux- hurst Homes for Inebriates at Reigate, said prisoner had been cottage matron there, out was given notice, which expired on the 1st inst. During the later part of prisoner's time witness was much concerned as to her mental condi- lion, and, when prisoner spoke to witness upon the subject of the alleged assault, witness endeavoured to calm her. Since the crime prisoner had written witness saying she was quite contented and happy. The Rev. Henry Arthur Hall, chaplain at Duxhurst, informed the court that he had come to the conclusion that prisoner's mind wa.s affected. Evidence was given as to the purchase of a revolver at the Junior Army and Navy Stores by prisoner, and also as to her practicing shoot- ing at Egerton. Mr. Thirkell, of Biddenden, said Miss Peter- son told him she had invited deceased to meet her and others at school to settle differences. Superintendent Fowle said he found amongst prisoner's belongings at Biddenden a copy of "The Maiden Tribute to Modern Babylon" and a copy of the Criminal Law Amendment Act. At the conclusion of the evidence prisoner said there was no malice, and the deed could not be called murder. Witnesses having been called for the defence to prove insanity in the family, Accused was committed for trial.

TEXT OF THE MALE VICTIM'S…

TRAGEDY IN AN EDINBURGH HOTEL.

A77DREE EXPEDITIONS.

- EARL'S BROTHER AND HIS ACTRESS…

MISSING POLICEMAN FRIOI DOWLAIS.

[No title]

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RITUALISM IN THE CHURCH OF…

ROYALTY AT OMDURMAN.

MILL1VALL DOCK COMPANY

THE OUTRAGE AT BLAKENEY

GREEK ELECTIONS.