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,pMORGANSHIRE ASSIZES. '.

C0URT-

OPTHALMIA AT ELY SCHOOLS.

. ANNUAL DINNER OF CARDIFF…

—.» EDUCATION AT LLANDRINDOD…

.. INSURANCE CASE AT MERTHYR.

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CARDIFF WATERWORKS.

.ST^ JOHN'S CHURCN. CARDIFF

CABDIFF CORPORATION OFFICALS.

. N.U.T. BAZAAR AT SWANSEA.

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SOUTH GIATTGRCIIA^ CONSERVATISM.…

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SOUTH GIATTGRCIIA^ CON- SERVATISM. GATHERING- AT TOmrREFAIL. ) MB. TUDOR HOWELL, M.P., AND I SUNDAY CLOSING. I A smoking concert under the au&pices of the Tonyrcfail Conservative Association was heid on FRIDAY night in Tonyrefail Board School. A varied programme of music was excellently rendered and much appreciated by a very crowded audience. Political addresses were delivered a.t intervals, the principal speaker being Mr. W. Tudor Howell, M.P. for Denbigh District. Mr. S. Evans (Treferig House) occupied the chair, and, after a brief opening, called upon Mr. Tom Stephens to lead in the singing of the National Anthem. Next the chairman read a telegram from Major Wyndham-Quin (member for South Glamorgan) sending his good wishes and regretting his inability to be present.—Mr. Tudor Howell, who was heartily received, in referring to the gallant member for South Glamorgan, thought they could not have a more energetic or more eon- scientious representative than Major Wyndham- Quin to look after their interests in the great Parliament of the kingdom. (Applause.) They might not agree with his views on all points, but he thought the more they knew of him the more they would agree in the belief that he was a. man who honestly held the opinions he advo- cated. (Applause.) Speaking of the major as a politician, he congratulated them on return- ing A member to the House of Commons of the same opinions as himself. He (Mr. Howell) had been a. good deal in different parts of Wales, and he honestly and genuinely believed that a change had come over political thought throughout the Principality—that people had ccme to look closely into the meaning of Con- servative principles. He proposed to deal with two points in connection with Conservative principles. In the first place, he urged then never to believe, from any platform, the charge that the Conservative aLd Unionist party were opponents of progress. There could bo no greater slander against any party. The prin- ciple upon which they proceeded was that they would have progress, but progress upon prudent and cautious lines. (Applause.) Most of the industrial legislation of the last twenty or 30 years had been carried by Conservative Govern- ments. (Applause.) Another principle was that the stability of society depended upon the fact tha.t they must not unduly interfere with men's rights and property. They would never have prosperous trade if attacks were continually made upon property. It was not, perhaps, owing altogether to the advent of a Unionist Government, but, still, it was a. curious fact that since that Adminis- tration had taken. over the conduct of affairs trade had increased until, by the admission of everyone, the increase in exports in the last twelve months exceeded neariy a.ny previous IDJreaee in a single year, and that was because people felt SECURITY in investing money AND developing business. In regard to proposals from time to time to make attacks upon pro- perty, it was, he pointed out, easy to attack other people's property, but when an attack WAS MADE upon their own it was wonderful how quiekly thev STOOD up in defence of it. (Hear, NEAR.) DEALING with several of the matters now prominently before the country, lie first alluded to the Tr ick Amendment Act, which greatly anected toe working classes, and if they ever heard it said that it was the intention of the Government to inflict new fines, tha.t charge was absolutely untrue. Their real intention was to restrict the ingenuity of those who un- justly got round the provisions of the Act. (Applause.) During the recent elections the Government WAS blaaned for putting the Act upon the Statute Book. The fines were said to be fines inflicted by a Tory Government, whereas the Government, with tne sanction of the Labour members, did its beSt to cut the fines down. (Applause.) Mr. Howell WENT on to say tha.t his name, AS they would have noticed, had lately been con- nected with the attempt recently made to pass through the House of Commons a Sunday Closing Bill for Wales amending the piesent Welsh Sunday Closing Act. He had something to do with the discussion of the measure, which was not PARSED. It seemed to him that, while they had a Licensing Commission sitting and .in- quiring into the whole warkmg of 'HE licensing laws, it wag not A wise thing lor a. private member suddenly to introduce into the House of a Rill so important as that of Mr. Herbert Roberts' on the Sunday Closing ques- TI°N, (H^AJ, hear.) Therefore, he (the speaker) said, "Let us suspend our judgment the inquiry into the licensing laws has been held, and a. report issued upon the altera- tions that ought to be made." (Heiir, hear.) In the second place, the measure, in I?;S opinion, interfered too much with the liberty of the people. (Hear, hear.) It virtually paid that P-0 man, nowever far he might have travelled out of his way, should on a Sunday hava any liquid refreshment unless he had walked twelve miles from THE place at which he last slept. (Laughter and a. Voice: "Shame.") They might as well SAY that 10 should be required to walk 1.200 miles. (More laughter.) VAI-Y few people, unless tfhey were off for the night, with their carpet-bags, would go twelve miles for A walk. It would mean a walk of 24 miles, because one would have to get back if he ha<d drink as a bona-fide traveller. He agreed that there were parts of Wales in fl^ohSunday Closing BAD done a great deal 01 good. He believed that in the remoter parts, where there were no such methods of EAUB9 AND shebeens, the Act worked well, but they MUST recognise that the Act pressed hardly when it said that a man who was well enough off might keep his big wine' cellar and enjoy HIMSELF on a. Sunday, and that IF he wa.s not well enough off, he muse on the same day have a. glass of water and smoke his PIP? in cold comfort. Whatever might be the opinion of those with strong temperance VIews- and they were entitled to their opinion6-men who did not atgree with them had an equal right to their views and the exercise of them (Applause.) A celebrated man oooe said they would never make England eober by Act of Parliament, and so he thought. If a man was given, to dunk on SIX days in the week they would not make him sober by Sun- DAY prohibition. (A Voice: "That's A fart.") Coming to employers' liability, hE did not want working men. to depend upon litiga- bion for compensation in accident*. They should have a scheme, such as H*e bethevod the Government would put before the countty, by which when a man was injured he would not have to SUE his employer in the county-oourt, but should bo compensated apart from litiga- tion. The hon. member ooncltided with some referencen to the Education Bill, in which he explained that it was the object of the Government to put the voluntary schools on a fair footing in competition with the board schools. (Applause.) Mr. Tudor Howell was THANKED warmfiy for his address, and WAS AGAIN loudly cheered on leaving.

EAST GLAMORGAN CONSERVATIVE…

A CARDIFF BURGLAR AT BRISTOL.

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LICENSING QUESTION. I

------------------------MUMBLES…

CARDIFF CORPOIIATION AND THE…

SWANSEA COiRFORATIOX FINANCES.

. DOCTOR QUESTION AT MERTHYR.

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NEW RECTOR OF NEATH.

-----.----------NORTH WALES…

PENARTH MISSING GIRL,

ST. DAVID'S AFFILIATION CASE.