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i ^ADDEFIAD TICHBORNE.

—— SUnda°N AT PONTYPRIDD.

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- THE SOUTH WALES UNIVERSITY…

THE ARISTOCRAT AND CONOERT-HALL…

GLAMORGAN SUMMER ASSIZES.

RECTORSHIP OF LLANDRINDOD…

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The Proposed Exhibition.

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(From Our Own Correspondent.) PARIS, Juke 19. The Proposed Exhibition. The opposition against the proposed plan of the 1900 exhibition increases. The site is con- sidered to be so vast as to re-call Chicago's World's Fair, "where visitors had to walk a great deal to see—nothing." A smaller site, more exclusiveness in the admission of unfrivo- lous exhibits ought to be acted upon. Parisians are also agreed that the necessary clia-nges to be made :n the Champs Elysees would destroy the btauty of the latter, claimed to be unrivalled. To cut down the trees contemplated—and inevi- table-would 1M sacrilege. The erection of a gigantic bridge 77 yards wide, in steel, and crossing the Seine in a single span, of the ass hack model, would be rather an eyesore than a thing of beauty it would also re-call the bridge of Areola, that has to be fixed up every third year. By reducing the area of the site the expense of the exhibition would be less. When the Bill is submitted to Parliament the plans will be severely criticised, and improvement- adopted. Then the Municipal Council, before it will vote its part of the expense—twenty million francs—will have to be counted with. Parisians are not satisfied with the work of the architects. Tho construction, cf the exhibition v ill cost 100 million francs. The Munici- pality and the State will each guanuitee a one-fifth. The remaining sixty million francs will have to be raised by the issue of shares at 20f. Unlike pre- vious financial baits, they will not be redeem- able; they will re-caill some up-to-date plans for running newspapers, where purchasers of a share would receive back their investment in kind. Stead is an authority on such combina- tions. Each holder of share will have the right, to twenty free admissions to the exhibi- tion—or a free entry once a week; if the share be taken by a citizen a, reduction to the amrsements would also be secured. A rural shareholder cannot benefit in the latter privi- lege, but the railway and boat companies will concede a, diminution of at least 33 per cent, in fares thrice, twice, and once, as the holder resides 125, 250, or 375 miles and above from Paris respectively. There will be a monster lottery, but no wins will be in money. Numerous prizes will be made in circular tour tickets, hotel coupons included; there will be fifteen circular tickets for a free voyage round the world, several automobile vehicles, and hundreds of bicycles. The Rumoured Ruaso-French Alliance. Opinion, though the fact was already dis- counted, has been taken aback by the official announcement of the alliance between. Russia and France. Coming just at the eve of the Kiel fetes, that ought to solace those patriots wlhose hearts were throbbing with sorrow because France sent warships to acknowledge with several other nations an in- ♦ie relational! courtesy. Even linked with Russia. France c-auOet eman- cipate herself from the duties or obliga> tions of Triteness to do- so she would cloud her reputation for gallantry, and be as fretful as a soured schoolboy. The first question asked when the dual alliance was formally announced was, What will England do?'' '"o 0 remain isolated is impossible: she has already "hedged" by n earing Italy; that many consider is her Sr.st step into the triple alliance. The world will be all the better by the Powers taking up a position clear and defined. It is the absence of that which has produced all the sickly uneasiness existing since some years past. Perhaps Germany will be more diplo- matically affected by the official announcement of the Callo-Musco alliance than England, though both, it may be taken for granted, have lor.p iufo examined the- eventuality. Some Iwulevard statesmen are very maladroit in iuhilatinff ">n rljc, presumed isolation ot Eng- land. B..t rhe 'stvious French do not share that viov. Two conclusions are drawn Eng- land will not- in the Armenian alliance become a eatspaw, bat will draw nearer to Austria, that viov. Two conclusions are drawn Eng- land will not- in the Armenian alliance become a eatspaw, bat will draw nearer to Austria, whose new Foreign Minister has just. declared that the triple alliance will be more firmly upheld Mian eYCr and, se<on«'ly, that the occu- pation Etfvplt by the British may now be regarde us permanent till expelled. v joming Academicians- The re.i-i)tioii at the Academy of a new Immortal is a. kind of necrc-baptismal ceremony. The inc'iruj.ig Academician is expected to scatter flower.- on the defunct whose fa-uteuil lw suc- ceeds t». and the iniinortiail told off t.t t, the new-born throws bad soi. e of the flowers, re-calling a faattledor and shuttiiei cock arrangement. Li the re(«ption of M. Paul Bourget, the "heart naroinist," by Vieomte de Vogue, tIt. "soul d. the shuttle cock was Maxiime du Camp. v. h« had nothing in common with his intellecti1' grave-diggers. When Ernest Rcnan succeeded Henri Martin, the popular historian of France, he devoted only twelve line- to the eulogium of his faute-uil prede- c-t .s-rr. arid those wrapped up in sunny mockery. Du ranp lias a, galley slave in every walk of l,:U-iuiv ..ot excepting poetry. He was always opening the sepulchres of history, so did not improperly name himself an old grave-digger. But he led a turmoiled exis- tence: he was a good political hater. He cf.mim iiCMl life by endeavouring to quit it. Di-api/iinted in love, he resolved to commit s;.icidc. Werther called on the-Saint Simonian the P-re Enfentin. "So you wish to die; what an idea Write me down on paper all your anxieties, Liid call c-n me in two litolitbs." Du Comp returned in two months. i the Bere to him. "Well, I have a. hook and am resolved not to kill myself. j said the Pere gaaJy; "you have vomited tttie poison. Work is the oure for life's ills- A French Garibaldian Red Shirt. Maxime du Camp was one of the few Frenchmen who joined Garibaldi's Red Sfnrte. Deputy LookToy, the present Chairman o. the Budget Commission, is the | oj'V French survivor of the daring "Thou- sand" Nut Du Camp -loitered in Ej?vpt to pick up cunos of the she.phefrd kings. A let+er-wfight on his writing-table was com- posed of the skeleton foot of a mummy. Des- barolles, the famous ohiromaneisit, one day took up the foot and its dark toe-naikyold by 4,000 ve;Vrs-perhaps a member of the *orty Sux-le* that looked <1 own from the Pyramids on "Vi.poleon.who tolerated no dual controls, aaid his army. "The owner of that foot died from an accident to his head," observes Desbamjles "J know it, but the doctors? do not." Du Camp had also the right band, mummitied, of La- cenaiw, the murderer, under a glass case. Superstitions people called to be allowed to ttouch it, to ward off danger from them. lie intended, and nearly succeeded in obtaining, the body of the terrible assassin, Troppmami, to petrify it. He wished to exhibit Propp- mann's onrang-outa-ng arms, and the bungling of the guillotine which cut the wreton, not- ouite. at the neck, but in two, at the client. Troppmann, in a final physical wriggle, squeezed himself out- of the half-moon of the machine and inflicted a fearful bite on Hem- rie}yS—itlie executioner-hand. "You dirty frog" observed the latter, "but your struggle was'hard all the same." Du Camp had a splendid head, and sot to have, it copied by Ziegier, the painter, for a John the Baptist. "I know myself very well," said Du Camp, "but when 80 maoy adventures are related about me that never occurred, and so many lwgeoids that never existed, how can I accept the bio- graphies of those whom I do not know ?" When he was writing the "History of the Private Charities of Paris" he called on the Cardinal Archbishop for a rreneraJ authorisation to visit the convents, saying, "I'm a very wicked man, your Eminence." Handing him the favour, the Archbishop, with a paternal sanile, said, "My son, the less you beliwe the more we will beilieve in you." Du Camp wrote terrible ipwnifblets upon tiie Couinruiuate but tbsu be fought ugaiogt tihimi, and they inflicted on him a. few ugly gunshot wounds. Improving Away the Horse. It is a difficult time and a dark outlook for the horse: the noble animal bids fair to be improved out of existence by railroads, bicyoles, and automobiles. A moe between these horse- less carriages—the latter extremely ugly and comfortless, re-calling a ship fitted out for exploring the North Pole-lias just- taken place, between 40 entries over the high roads tc Bordeaux and back to Paris, some 723 miles. The vehicles were propelled by electricity, com- pressed air. gas, petroleum, and steam. Petro- leum won easily; its car accomplished the run to Bordeaux in 221 hours, at a rate of 16k n-iles per hour. These self-propelling vehicles do not frighten horses now in the streets;, they emit a dry, husky, snappish cough, and which the horses seem to view as the conse- quence of ill-health of some member of their race. By 1900 there is likely to be no horse traction in the Metropolis. Can they re-place seven horses drawing a block of building-stone ten tons in weight ? For the Laaies. Ladies visiting Paris are, naturally, inte- rested in the fashions. Let them not omit to pay a visit to the Cluay Museum, where a glass case has recently been placed filled witJh bonnets from various parts of tlhe Con- tinent and a. few centuries old. The most curious general remark the collection suggests i" the resemblance in the main lines between the bonnets then and now; they are large as a Rembrandt, small as a capote; heavily trimmed with lace, embroidered hands, fur, and silver and gold trinkets and spangles. There are some eccentric shapes, and the materials and colours are strange. A Rush, for the Law. Educationists look with dismay on the con* tinuabion of the rising tdô of young men entering the school of law to become notaries or barristers or attorneys. As .soon as a trades- man is able to save the feef-vei-y modest, Ijesides—to support his son's college expenses,, he sends him to Paris to study for a liberal pro- fession—the bar is now the ideal preferred, because a lad with a good gift of the gab can; make his way. Words, not ideas, seem to win the masses in France. At the recent Inter- national Miners' Congress I was particularly, struck with the little influence French speakers exercised and the impatience their discourses created. They indulged in words, phrases, and locutions; but if, by chance, facts and figures were handled, the speaker immediately gained a sympathetic hearing from both the English and the German delegates. Freiich lawyers claim Jeaus as the first barrister when he pleaded for humanity. That was different from Napoleon 1. he deteekd lawyers, and had only one w;sh when they attacked his Government—to cut their tongues out.

THE MAN WITH THE CHEER* FUL…

PRINCE OF WALES AT TRINITY…

,-ROOM FOR OFFICIALS OF PARLIAMENT.