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jTALE OF THE APACHES. 1

,.-....... .t,sOP d'T'1 ^DITISS"…

j f0 KENTUCKY FI8K-STORY.

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._--DRILLING ALL NIGHT.

.HOW TO GET THIN.

I A CONTICT'S STATEMENT.

AUTOMATIC SI SO.

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ROMANTIC STORIES.. A BARON WEDS AN ALSATIAN MAIDEN. The following advertisement! recently ap- peared 1 in several America-n papers —In order to settle estate, lu/orasA'-ea is wanied of Baron Oa.mi.ue Stoewfeiai, 0 left his home in Geubiville, Alsace, Germany, in 1886, for this country, was employed in a New York Hotel, and afterwards went to Cincinnati.— Address, &c. Behind this advertisement lies a. story of the romantic attachment of an aristocrat for a pretty peasant girl, followed by marring.- and voluntary exile, and the pangs of poverty in a strange land for eight- years. Stoeehlin and his sister Annie were the only children of the titled and wealthy family that lived in the picturesque town of Geubiville, When Camille was 26 years old his parents desired him to marry, and, in accordance with the custom prevailing, they took on themselves the task of selecting a wife for him. It seems, however, that he had been smitten with the oharms of an Alsatian maiden, and had plighted his froth. She was only a peasant girl, without dower or rank, but in his eyes her face was her fortune, and he vowed to her that no allurements or persuasions would per- suade him from making her his wife. He was true to his promise. He parted from his parents in anger, and to their great grief he married the peasant girl the following day in the little church of the town. That evening in the month of June, years ago, the romantic couple left their native place for the New World. They had a hard time in America Stoeehlin's condition became so redueed that he.was glad to accept the most menial kind of labour. One day he wandered into a New York hotel, and asked the clerk if there was a vacant place in the hotel? 'We are short a dish-washer, but I don't suppose you would take that," said the clerk. But Camille could not afford just then to refuse even that humble chance, so he went to work in the kitchen of the hotel. ITe stayed a time, and afterwards went to Cincinnati to see if better luck would not befall him tht re. While he was walking 011 Broadway one afternoon he was recognised by a servant who had come from Alsace, and was then employed by a family in that city. She knew his history. The girl made inquiries and learned of the sad fate of the couple. They had often lived in extreme want in miserable rooms while in the city, and many times they lacked even the bare necessities of life. When she wrote home she told her friends of her unexpected meeting in the New World, and to what a sad termination the acquaintance of Stoeehlin and the girl had come. The news was soon carried to Camille's family, but death in the meantime had visited the family and his parents had both died. The Alsatian servant was greatly surprised a few days ago to re- ceive a letter from Annie Stoeehlin requesting her to forward whatever information she could of Baron Camille Stoeehlin, and reciting the death of her parents, and that a large sum had been left for the absent, but Unforgotten, son. The baron is a broad-shouldered, good- looking man, now about 34 years old. He is about 5ft. 8in. in height, and wears a beard. A LATE M.P. AND A GIRL OF HUMBLE BIRTH. A most romantic story from real life is now going around among the quidnuncs (says the London correspondent of the "South Wales Post"). It is safe to say that nothing more complicated and thrilling has ever been con- ceived by a writer of fiction. The central figure in the story is a lately-deceased M.P. for one of the divisions of the home counties. A dozen years ago, more or less, the hon. gentle- man beea-pie acquainted with a girl of humble birth. The acquaintanceship ripened into affection. That it was not the fascination of a passing fancy was evidenced by the care which the M.P. took to have the girl educated. Ultimately she was sent to com- plete her education on the Continent. Pre- viously to her residence abroad her lover had settled a handsome amount ot money upon her —in fact, almost half his fortune. In process of time the marriage oame about, the lady passing as the descendant of a French family of private means and gentle birth. In a few years the lady, unfortunately, died, and after her death there appeared on the scene a man who claimed to be her husband, and sought to establish his title to her property—property which was given to her by the M.P. in the manner described. A few months ago the M.P. met with a shocking accident-, which resulted fatally, and now his executors are being '.ued in the courts. The whole story is of a most remarkable character, and when the oass comes on for hearing your readers may prepare for revelations of a startling character. PlIm-

A NEW RUSSIAN SHELL.

A NEW RUSSIAN SHELL.

JACK AND HIS "GROG."

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'--_--------STOBIES ABOUT…

LADY SENT TO PRISON.

AN EX-POLICEMAN'S CPaME.

KILLED WHILE GOING RABBIT…

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-------"--e__-! DRUGGED AND…

MAltRIED A CENTURY.

--------SOME CURIOUS EFFECTS…

----_--_-__----_.jFRENCH MURDERER…

i STEALING- A CHILD.

.DEATH OF VIE COUNTESS BATIING.