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IA ClIATTY REVIEW OF THE WEEK'S…

IMPRISONED ON A SHIP.

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IMPRISONED ON A SHIP. The steamship NormaM'.ia., from Hamburg, arrived in the port of New York on Saturday, September 5, 1892, with ca,es! of cholera, on board. Many of the ship's company had died on tirj passage. At Hamburg and elsewhere in Europe th-3 disease was raging. The autho- rities in America were alarmed lest the scourge should be introduced into that country. Hence should be introduced into that country. Hence they quarantined the Normannia, with every soul of her passengers and crew. The writer was a. passenger. It w.M an a,wful time. Death v. :).s among us and on all siden of us. Nobody knew who next would fall. We were im- prisoned. Liberty never seemed so fair, uor so far. We could neither fight nor ny. 'there we were—hundreds of rs—perfectly well, and yet bound together as with (hains, that the health omcer of the port might see whether the plague would not yet break out in our midst. When at last—after weeks of this— wo were set on .shore, men lifted their hats and reverently said, "Thank God!" This was being shut up under eondit;r)ng to make it horrible a.id fearful. Yet any form of inca.rcera.tion is bau. enough. Heie is a. woman. for example, who says, I never moved a yard from my own doorstep for twenty weeks!" Her own hoase was a prison to her. Who had sentenced her? A judge? N(I;;1, power greater and m:)re pitiless than any judge. Her tale runs thus —In April, 1882, whilst living at Lather's Farm, Old.3ampford, Essex, a, fire broke out, and the family were burned out of hojse and home. We have no call to remark on such a calamity. The very thought of it is fit to make one '-biver with dread. For most of us it is like the world coming to an end to experience such a disaster. Well, what happened a.fter that the lady shall tell in he'r own fa.s.hio.n—the best of all fashions, because it is Dla.in and straight to f'o point, kyhe says:—"Owing to our bed- diug being damp from exposure. I took a bad cold, which brought on rheumatic fever. For fourteen days I to my bed, and for twenty weeks I never' moved a yard from my own doorstep. After a time the fever abated, leaving me weak, languid, and low. At first I had a sickening taste in the. mouth and a poor appetite. No matter how simple a.nd light the food was, I was afraid to eat, I'o'r it was sure to give me pain at tiie chest and sides; so I often had to loosen my corset a.nd undress _d,rin(,, -the day. I could not bear the weight of my clothing. "I wa.s constantly spitting up a scur, frothy Ruid, a.ad had a gnawing pain at the pit of the stomach—like hunger, and yet. diSerent. It was with difficulty i voided the kidney secretion., and my boweds., ankles, a.nd legs began to awell. I got worse; I v/as in agcny night and day, and could not IJut my foot on the ground. a.ftbrwaji.'ds: a husky cough took me, and my throat filled with a. thick phlegm. I could not sleep, a.nd was never easy. Later on T had often to sit up in bed, for I felt 'a.s if I should choke. "Year after year I continued to suSer '1 this way. grooving' worse and worse, until I despaired of ever being well a.g<un. But who can tell when trouble will cc-me, or when relief? A wondwful Providence is over all. "One day m June a. book came by post describing Mother Seigel's Curative Syrup, and what it, had done for iM-ay poor sufferers. got a. bottle from Mr. Suckling, medicine dea.ler, and a.fter taknig it for a short time all pain left me, and I gradually o-amed stre.ngth. By taking an occasiona/1 dose I have smce kept in good health, and can ea.t and digest any kind of food. (Signed) Mrs. Lydia. Green, Moor End, Great S.a.m'nford, via Bra,mtree, Essex, Aug 24th, 1892." Now. in order that Mrs. Green's clear and trutMm stateme'at may be of use to others <as Hhe desires it to be), we must add a, word or two. The bad cold she caught at the '6re no doubt brought on -me. rneumacc rever 'as sne rela?.t? but. there wa..n something' 'back of the cold. for a, cold never causes rheumatism. The rheumatic seeds. or poison must. already lie in the bicc'-i: s.nd that poison is always created l.y pre-existing indigestion a.nd dvs-nepsia, whether the suNerer. knows it or not. Tills is proved by the fact. that. Mrq. Greeny ehi&f ailment for ten yeaj-3 after the '6je was not rheumatism; hut. indigest¡ion a.nd dyRr'e'nsia, and dropsy, which is me of its reRnlt-a a.nd symntoms. Wlum the dio'c-atioB. was Im ally righted by the rpmedy she a.Iluoes to, nn her apparent, maladies ceMpd Whv? Because, she :had but one, lNe said. Ah. vep. Di.?ea.ae is a, stp,ru ia.ilor. A-nd how et (I '"hea.D) is libert.v. obtained by Mnther S€ige'l's he1,p. Lc501

THE LATE EXECUTION ATI' CARMARTHEN.

THE INCREASE OF TRAIIf.PS.1

SUICIDE AT ABERDARB.

EVEN HP TO DATE.

MOW HE SATED HIS WIFE'S MFE!

TEE TALKYR.IE.

FIRE AT OLDHAM.

SUNDAY OBSERVANCE.

BETTING HOUSES CONVICTIONS.

A FATAL ITALIAN ELOPEMENT.

FROLICS OF A PRINCESS.

TRAMWAYS PURCHASE.

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