Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

17 articles on this Page

COOKING LESSONS FOR; WORKING…

NOTES.i

QUERIES.

REPLIES.

THE HEAD OF " THE 1 GRAPHIC."…

Advertising

1' \o-■! QUERIES.

REPLIES.

--.--_.-----_n-----REFUSES…

SERIOUS DISASTER AT SUNDERLAND.

News
Cite
Share

SERIOUS DISASTER AT SUNDERLAND. Shipping on Fire in the River. Naprow Escape of a Card iff Tug. About twelve o'clock at noon on Wednesday the people employed on the weir in the vicinity of Messrs J. L. Thompson's shipyard, Sunderland, were startled at a sudden leap of flame from the river to a height of about twenty feet and to a length of almost 300 vardf. It appears that the >t. amer Wild Flower, wh cil was built some twelve months ngo for carrying oil in bulk, was in the river for repairs, find wAs discharging her water ballast. It is thought some oil must have got into the bilg", so that the water and the oil mixed was being pumped in!o the river. Alongside of the Wild Flower were the steamship Douglas, the steamship Deronda. and a tug- boat named the Earl of Dumfries. There was also close at hand the newly-built steamer Park- field, and it is supposed that a hot rivet fell from the last-named vessel into the river, and thus set fire to the oil. At once the Amies arose to a great height and completely enveloped the Douglas and the tugboat, and also seriously burnt the Deronda. The Wild Flower was removed to the centre of the liver as soon as possible, and the Fire Queen and the Fire Harrow were quickly upon the spot and threw water upon the burnmg vessels. The laTJor Quay of Messrs. J. L. Thompson was burnt to the extent of 50 y irds, and the fire-hose belonging to the yard was brought to bear upon this. A man was seen to jump from one of the burning vessels, and before he could be rescued lie had sunk, and was drowned. The tide, happily was flowing in the right direciion to prevent wlmt must have been a dreadful culamity. A short. distance to the other side of the Wild Flower were eight or nine wooden vesselq, and, had the tide been on the outward turn, these must have been wrecked. As it was, the tidi*, which was running prttty swifilv, carried the finning oil to a great distance. The flimes on the river were soon out through the exhaustion of the oil, but the vessels continued burning for about an hour. The Wild Flower, which was ashore at Southwold recently and had arrived at Sunderland for i-epairv,, was the most severely damaged, the hull being burnt, the deck properties destroyed, and the m ists and rigging burnt away. The Deronda and the Douglas, both of Sunderland, were similarly damaged, though not to the same extent-, and the tug also suffered in the sume way. The man who was drownetl leaped from the steamer Deronda at a time when it wac abhz. His name was John Thompson, aged 20. His body was recovered. Two other- who leaped into the water to escape the flames got safely ashore. It was some hours before the river assumed its normal appearance.

A TERRIBLE TALE OF THE SEA.;

THE QUEEN OF ROUMANIA WRITING…

Advertising

-----------------------__!…

STABBED IN THE BACK.

FOUND DEAD IN A BOX.

Advertising