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THE COLIN CAMPBELL DIVORCE…

ACCIDENT TO LADY COLINI CAMPBELL.

! CHARGE OF FRAUD AGAINST…

-! THE CARDIFF ACCOUNTANT…

CARDIFF BANKRUPTCY COURT.!

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CARDIFF BANKRUPTCY COURT. At Cardiff Bankruptcy Court on Tuesday (before I Mr. Langley, the Registrar) several debtors came up for examination by the Official Receiver (Sir. T. H. Stephens). In the case of Edward Kinsey, grocer, 28, Bute- terrace, Cardiff, Mr. G. David appeared for a petitioning creditor.—Tbe debtor stated that he had been in business in Cardiff about five years. His capital on commencing was :;15. He pre- viously traded at Abardare, where in 1875 he filed his petition and paid a conposition of Is. in the JE. In December, 1835, he had a private meeting of his creditors and again paid a composition, and was released from his debts. His present liabili- ties had been incurred since that time. Shortly before his petition was filed he sold some of his furniture. The pressure upon him then was very great, and lie sold the iurniture thinking he could do so at an advantage, and that it would be for tho benefit of his creditors. His wife had some property in Herefordshire, left by his father's will. There was a mortgage upon it, the interest of which was paid by his wife out of the rent received from the property.—The caso was adjourned until the 16th inst. Thomas James, draper and builder, Blaengarw, who also came up for examination, said he com- menced business at Blaengarw about two years ago. He then went to Cadoxton, where he carried on building operations. At Bridgend he offered his creditors 12s. 6d. in the JS, which he proposed to realise by selling his stock-in-trade and furni- ture, and also by borrowing from his friends. The offer was refused, and, in consequence, h6 had to file his petition. The further examination of the debtor was adjourned until the 16th inst. In the matter of Benjamin Arthur, provision merchant, Cardiff, Mr. Downing appeared for the debtor, and Mr. Fedden (from the office of Mr. H. P. Ingledew) for petitioning creditors. Debtor, in examination, stated that he formerly carried on business at Rotunda Buildings, Cardiff. He began business in 18SO with a capital of £500 of his own and £1,200 borrowed from friends. In 1835 he had to stisDend payment. He then assigned the whole of his estate to his brother, Mr. W.E. Arthur, for the benefit of his creditors, a.nd called a private meeting of them, at which he made an offer of 6s. 8d. in the JS, the payment of which was guaranteed by his brother. This was accepted by the majority of the creditors, but three or four of them persistently refused it, and hence he became bankrupt. After the business had been assigned to his brother he (the debtor) became manager of it at a salary of £150 per annum. Since 1885 the business had declined, and the debtor was now a traveller for a wholesale firm in London. He resided at PenartU in a house belonging to his wife, which she had acquired through a Building Society. The. furniture also belonged to his wife, having been given titem by her parents when they were married, about 21 years ago. His brother to whom the business at Rotunda Buildings was assigned was a merchant in London, and was now on his way to Japan upon business connected with his firm, who traded with that country.— The Registrar adjourned the further examination of the debtor until the 16th inst.—The debtor's liabilities are £ 3,212, and the assets nil. Charles Jones, hairdresser, Castie-strest, Cardiff (represented by Mr. G. David), was also examined. He stated that he had only been in business in Cardiff since the 25th of June last. He was for- merly at Carmarthen. Ho had no capital on coming to Cardiff. His debts were chiefly contracted at Carmarthen. He had paid away considerable sums to assist a daughter in business, and had had to II pay JE200 under a surety into which he had entered for a brother-in-law.—Adjourned until the 16th instant. Thomas Edward Davies, draper and outfitter, Pontycymmer, in examination, stated that he com- menced business in January, 1885. He had no capital at tha time, but his lather-in-law became security for the payment of bills. During the period of his trading he had incurred liabilities amounting to jEl,230, and he attributed his failure to the bulk of the trade having leit the place. Pontycymmer was a mining district. When he went there there were prospects of success, but he had been disappointed. The assets were £2CS. The examination was adjourned until the 16tu inst., and the court then rose.

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CARDIFF IMPARTIAL SOCIETY.…

MEETING OF WELLS' CHAUITST…

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