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THE COLIN CAMPBELL DIVORCE…

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THE COLIN CAMPBELL DIVORCE SUIT, The Colin Campbell divorce case was down for trial on Friday morning in the Divorce Division of che High Court ot Justice (before Mr. Justice 3utt and a special jury). To obviate the incon- venience caused by the assembling of large Crowds around the doors, barricades had been Erected, but long before half-past ten the atten- Sants were besieged by applicants for admission, And very early the court was crowded. The case appeared in the lists a" Campbell v. Campbell and Campbell tI. Marlborough, Shaw, Hutler, and Bird. The counsel instructed were:—For Lord Colin Campbell: Mr. R. Finlav, Q.C., Mr. F. Lockwood, Q C., M.P., and Mr. R. Searle. For Lady Campbell: Sir C. Russeil, Q.C., M.P„ Mr. lnderwick, Q.C., and Mr. Charles Matthews. For the Duke of Marl- borough: The Attorney-! ieneral and Mr. Lewis Cowaid. For Captain Shaw: Mr. Gullv, Q.C., vnd Mr. C. Strong. For General Butler: Mr. Murphy, Q.C.. and Mr. Synnett. For Dr. Bird: rise Solicilor-Crencrul and Mr. T. Terrell. His lordship entered the court at half-past ten, ttid the jury was at onco sworn. At the outset ;here w.ts a dispute between counsel as to which side should open the pleadings. The first case in She list was Lady Campbell's suit for a iivorce, and with that Mr. Matthews tsked to open the pleadings. Ms-. Fin lay, Q.C., on the other hand, u;g:-<i that Lord Colin Campbell was entitled to open the bail, as tlfe Dthrr case was only entered very hurriedly in :>r<ier to forestall his Jordship's suit. Sir Charles Russell "food on his right as beine first in the list, aud, after argument, his lordship decided that Lady Colin's suit should be first heard. Mr. Matthews then opened the pleadings, which alleged cruelty ami adultery against Lord Colin Campbell; the cross-suit, alleging adultery against. Lady Colin with the co-respondents named, was also set forth. LADY CAMPHELL'S CASE. Sir Charles Russell then opened the cnse for Lady Campbell, des.-nbing it as both extraordinary and painful. Lady Colin Campbell was the Sautter of Mrs. Blood, and Lord Colin was a son of the Puke of Argyll. Their marriage was based Dn sincere and muiual affection. Miss Blunt was not an heiress, but she was a lady of considerable accomplishments, and after a not very long acquaintance Lord Colin proposed. He was at the time suftering from a painful disease, necessitating an operation. He after- wards went to the Cape of Good Hope, and, in consequence of the slowness of his recovery, the marriage had to be postponed from thp da;e originally fixed. On the 21at of July, 1831, the parties were married, the engagement having commenced in September, 1830, and Lord Coiin having a month before the marriage commu- aicated to his inter.ded wife the fact that for some ■ cime after marriage they must occupy separate apartments. The marriage took place at the Savoy Clwpel, and the honeymoon was spent at I the Isle ol Wight, Lord Colin being attended by a hospital nurse; in fact, down to 1883 he had an attendant of that description. The marriage ■WHS consummated in Scotland in October, 1381. The effect oi the consummation was toseriousfy ininre Lady Colin's health. On the 17th of June, 1882, a circumstance occurred at Cadogan-place, on which was based the charge of adultery against Lord Cohn hut he would not co into the details of that at present. Subsequently another opera- tion was necessary for Lord Colin, and after his convalescence he was attended by Mr. Tern Bird, who aiso, with his lordship's full cognisance, attended Lady Colin, whose life was being ren- dered almost unbearable and revolting by the existing state of things and by her sufferings. She, consequently, sought in the early part of 1833 relief by the way of judicial separation, and she wrote a letter to Lord Colin, the contents of which were conveyed to him by Lady Miles, with whom th»y were staying. The document set forth the painful story of her married life, and her desire to remain a friend and companion, but to cease cohabitation. Lord Colin wrote a reply, of which only a copy now existed, in which he made statements which could only be taken as a reply to her letter, and in which also he mis-stated I the nature of his disease. It. was in April, 1883, ihe first allegation was made against Lady Camp- Dell in regard to Mr. Bird, it being based on a itatement by a hired nurse, Mr. Bird indignantly repudiated it. He declined to continue attending her ladyship unless it were withdrawn and an apology made. It was withdrawn, and Lord Colin requested Mr. Bird to continue his attendance. Later in the year Lady Campbell insisted on having the relief she had asked for. At a faniilv council Lord Colin threw out insinuations which he susequently most solemnly withdrew. Mr. George Lewis was eventually consulted on her behalf. Correspondence ensued, and the petition for judicial separation was filed on the 4th of August, 1883, on the ground of cruelty. The charges were denied in the respon- dent's answer. On the 11th of September, 1883, some correspondence took place between Lord Colin and Lady Miles, in which a statement was made having an important bearing on the charge of adultery preferred against. Lord Colin. The suit for judicial separation came on, and in the course of it all allegations against Lady Colin were withdrawn. A decree was made by the 'iourt as asked, and since then Lord CoHn had spared neither money nor social influence to rake from tha gutter evidence calculated to injure her tair fame. After the decree of judicial separation was pronounced Lady Campbell left ber husband's borne. Her steps had since been dogged by detectives when under the care abroad of her father and mother, but by her wish her husband bad been kept aware of her movements. In June, 1884, the was in Paris with Mr. and Mrs. Biood and the charge cf adultery with the Duke of Marlborough was based on a visit paid by that co-respondent to her while there. On the 8th of June, 1884. there were together in Paris Lord Coiin Ounpb 11, his solicitor (Mr. Hum- phreys), and a Mr. Rae.a Paris solicitor. Would they believe it that Lord Colin Campbell made a normal complaint, in writing, to the Paris municipal authorities to have a warrant issued on which his wife, if found in suspicious circum* stances, might be arrested and lodged in the prison of St. Lnzare! Lord Colin's pride had been lowered to the dust, and, apparently, he thought there was nothing low enough to stoop to to gratify his passion for revenge. Had the warrant heen executed, Lady Colin might have been detained in the prison for months. They had dpcumentary evidence to support what, seemed to be almost inconceivable. Mr. and Mrs. Blood left Ffrria ignorant of the steps taken, and! then Lady Colin took up her residence in London. As to the allegation of adultery against Lord Colin, it was intended to give evidence suggesting undue familiarities between his lordship and Mary Watson, a housemaid, at Cadogan-place, and Ladv Miles would state that on the 18th of June, 1832, she found the girl in Lord Colin's bedroom under circumstances which could lead to only one conclusion. During 1884 Lady Miles suggested to Lord Colin the desirability of a divorce being obtained, and considerable corre- spondence ensued, in the course of which Lord Colin tried to entrap Lady Mile*. Finally, he said he should charge his wife with adultery. Lady Miles saw him with his solicitor, and re-called to his mind the story of Mary Watson, giving him five minutes to alter his intention, threatening, if he did not, she would go to Mr. Lewis. He decided to go on with the petition. Lady Miles went to Mr. Lewis's office, met there Lady Colin, and, for the first time,told her of the Mary Watson incident. On the 6th of November Lady Campbell filed her petition. On the following day Lord Colin tiled his. In March, 1835, Lady Campbell went by the St. Gothard route to Italy, and Lord Colin came to the conclusion she was going to Monte Carlo with the Duke of Marlborough, for which there was not a shadow of foundation. He again went to Paris, and applied for another warrant consigning his wife to St" Luzare. Lady Colin was etill seriously ill in Juiy, 1885. She returned to London, and the jury had now to deal with the issues between the parties. Charges were made against her, and, with one exception, they were in so vague and uncertain terms chat at that 8Uge he could not tell his tnswer. In the one specific case they had a com- plete answer. In regard to Captain Shaw, he was m intimate friend of the Campbells, but certainly Lord Colin, in a morbid state of mind, did at one ama express dislike at his visits to the house, which were consequently discontinued, but the cmptain would give a complete denial to the charge, as also would General Hutler, a friend of Lady Campbell, and one old enough to be her father, and whose wife was an intimate friend of Lady Colin. One and all the charges they were prepared toO meet in full. They ranged over a period when from the actual physical condition, it was improbable, if not impossible, they could be well founded. Lady Colin looked forward to the end of this trial to •rt'taia from the free minds of the jury a Terdlct. fully acquitting her from the foul aspersions which her husband had spared neither expense nor ingenuity to bring against her. Mr. lnderwick then put in the evidence of the luit for a judicial separ-tion. EVIDENCE OF LADY MILES. Lady Miles was the first witness. Examined by Mr. lnderwick, she deposed that she was the wife )1' Sir Philip Miles, and resided at heigh Court, Dear Bristol. She was first cousin of Lady Coiin's father, and was present at the marriage of Lord Coiin and Miss Blond. At the end of 1532 Lord Colin stayed at Leigh Court, with his wife, during a long illness, and, at witness's request, Mr. Bird attended Lord Colin during his illness, ua J also, at his lordship'^ request, Lady £ olin as well. In February, 1883, Lady Coiin gave witness a letter, and desired aer to read it to Lord Colin. She did not do so, Sut she made certain statements to Lord Colin. She told him that Lady Colin had quite made up tier mind not to live with him as his wife, but that she would continue on the kindest relations, and Would guard his reputation and all that concerned his interests. In reply, he said it was very hard on him, and he should expect her to live with him on the old terms. He also said she could not care tor him to a"k such a thing. He sent a letter in reply, and of tint Lady Colin made the copy pro- duced. On the 23rd of April witness went to London and saw Lady Colin in Cadogan-place. She was then very ill and in violent pain, and was being attended bj Dr. Bird, who wasaiso attending Lord Colin. Two ot three days later Lord Colin told witness there had been fod play and Lady violin had had a miscarriage. Witness told him it was im- possible; but he reiterated the charge, and men- tioned Dr. Bird's name, saying Tom bird's a ir>arp fellow; thev managed it between them." Se said Puffys, the nurse, told him Dr. Bird was in the house, and witness had a long conversation ^itli him. She then returned to Lord Colin, nnd told him Mr. Bird had solemnly asserted that Nothing of the kind had occurred. There had been bo miscarriage; It was an utter impossibility. He declined to attend Lady Colin any longer unless i>Qx4 Colia withdraw tlit accusation apologised. Lord Colin told witness to apologise for him, and she did so. The court here adjourned for luncheon. At two o'clock Lady Miles resumed her evidence. She stated that on the 20th of July, 1883, there was a family meeting at Mr. Blunt's house in Thurlow-square, which witness attended at Lord Colin's request. Certain suggestions were at. that meeting made by Lord Colin against his wife, but he subsequently asked witness to completely with- draw them. Witness was very angry with Lady Colin for instituting a suit for judicial separatiou. Some correspondence wok place between her and Lord Colin while it was pending, and in one of the letters his lordship suggested he should have to call her as a witness. She replied that she would be glad to help him with evidence on the charge of cruelty, but it would be better for him not to call her, be- cause of her knowledge of his relations with Mary Watson, and if she appeared in court she would be obliged to tell the whole truth, and under cross examination it would eure to come obliged to tell the whole truth, and under cross examination it would sure to come out; therefore, he bad better let her alone. After the separation was granted witness saw I Lord Colin, who expressed dissatisfaction at the result of the trial. She told him it was lucky for him it was not a dfvorce. Some letters passed between them. Witness, having heard that Lord Colin intended to present a petition against his wife, met Lord Colin at his solicitor's office, and, in the presence of young Mr. Humphreys, reminded him that, as he had committed adultery with Mary Watson, he must not file a petition against his wife. She told Mr. Humphreys that one evening while at Cadogan-place she pretended to leave the house, and subsequently went upstairs and found Lord Colin on the side of the bed embracing the girl, and she left immediately. Lord Colin denied the truth of the assertion, and his solicitor said it was an ugly charge. She said he had forced her to expose him by filing a peti- tion against an innocent woman; that she would give him five minutes to re-consider his decision, and that, if he did not withdraw it, she should communicate with Lady Colin and her solicitor, which she did, as Lord Colin decided to proceed with his petition. On the evening this adultery was committed Lord Colin said Mary Watson was a very pretty girl, who was very fond of him. She had pretty hair, and he used to take it down and play with it. Witness had seen letters from Mary Watson to Lord Colin. They were signed, Yours affectionately, Mary." Witness advised Lady Colin after that to send her away, as she was too pretty for a housemaid and an awkward person to be in the house. A week afterwards she told Lord Colin what she had seen, and he said a man could not account for every little thing he did. He did not deny it. A lot of letters between the witness and Lord Colin were then put in and read. They were couched in very intimate terms, Lord Colin being termed "Koko," Lady Miles "Muzzy," and Lady Colin The Arab." The reading of the correspondence was not com- pleted when the court rose. SECOND DAY. CROSS-EXAMINATION OF LADY MILES. The hearing of this suit was resumed on Satur- day morning. Lady Colin Campbell and her friends occupied the same seats as they did on Friday, as also did Lord Colin Campbell. Lady Miles again entered the box, and, in answer to Mr. Inderwick, said: Lady Colin Campbell pre- sided often at charitable meetings, and sang at concerts of the same description at the East-end of London. Cross-examined by Mr. Finlav: At the time I went to Mr. Lewis's office I telegraphed to Lady Colin to meet me there. I told Mr. G. Lewis that I had seen Mary Watson in Lord Colin's bedroom. I cannot answer for the memory of Lady Colin. I believed Mr. Lewis was going to act for Lady I Colin in the suit, and, under that impression, I gave the information I have stated. I did not at my interview with Mr. G. Lewis give the exact date of the occasion on which I saw- Mary Watson in Lord Colin's bedroom. I did not say it was the 17th of June, 1882, but I said it was in the month of Jnne. Did you forget that. yesterday you said it was on June 17 ?—At the interview I said it was in the month of June to the best of my recollection, but afterwards I was enabled to fix the date as June 17. Did not Mr. Lewis, before the 9th of December, 1384, apply to you for the date of the affair 7—No. What induced you to &x the date as the 17th of June i'—I put it down in my Prayer Book. Where is that, book ? Have you it with you ?— No. Where is it ? Is it. lying at church ?—No it is in my bedroom at Leigh Court. 1 should like to see t hat Prayer Book.—I can send for it. Sir C. Russell: The book shall be telegraphed for. Mr. Finlay: How came you to put a mark in your Prayer Book about the matter ?—I always read the Psalms in the morning, and on the date of the Psalms for the 17th day of the month I put a line, and by that I know the date. I also put a line under M," which formed a guide to Mary Watson. When you went into the room you were shocked, I suppose ?—I did not go into the bedroom. I saw it from the staircase. Then anyone passing up the stairs could see ?— Yes. You were very much shocked ?—I was. And you had never seen such a thing before ?— No, and I never want to see it again. Did it alter your feelings towards Lord Colin ?— Yes, I was much shocked. But you always felt towards him as a mother?— Yes; and I do now. Now, in the whole of your correspondence you made no allusion.to this affair ?—No, I do not put those things into letters. Letters often get mis- laid. When you spoke to Lord Colin some time after- wards about this what did you say P—I said that a man should not make love to the servant maids in the house. He had not been married a year, and I told him he had a beautiful wife, and ought to be satisfied. He eaid men would have little faults like that. What did you say then?—I said it was very wrong, and that it would not lead to happiness. I spoke to him as I should have spoken to my own son. In one of your letters you ask Lord Colm," Has Blandford anything to do with it ? Did that mean that you thought Lord Blandford was urging Lady Colin to go into cout ?—I did not wish the matter to come into court, neither did the Duke of Argyll. We did not want the scandal. I thought that Lord Blandford had porliaps recommended Ladv Colin to go to Mr. Lewis. But does not the allusion in the letter to Lord Blandford mean something about adultery with him ?—No. I alluded only to Lady Colin going to Mr. Lewis, the solicitor. Mr. Finlay was proceeding to cross-examine on various letters when tho witness said: You con- fuse me so. Why do you not go straight on ? You begin with 1881, then go to 1882, and then to 1884. How can my mind follow you ? (Clapping at the back of the court.) Mr. Justice Butt (severely) I cannot have that kind of noise in the court. Clapping in court is indecent in the extreme. I have given the ushers instructions to turn out anyone they see clapping his hands or to bring him before me. In your correspondence you make no allusion to having seen Lord Colin in adultery with Amelia Watson. Was that to keep Lady Colin out of court?—I wanted both of them to keep out of court. I ha.d no intention of appearing against Lord Colin. Then you wrote from The Shark, Cowes, with reference to a change of servants, and speaking of Lady Colin's suit you say, I call the whole affair infamous." Did you mean the proceedings she was taking against her husband ?—I thought the proceedings against her husband were ill- judged. Sir Charles Russell: She was not alluding to these proceedings. Mr. Finlay (to witness): You were referring to the suit of Lady Colin for a judicial separation? —Yes; I thought any suit of that kind was infamous. When you wrote that you knew that Lord Colin was guilty of adultery :,I-Yes. Then you think that such a suit was infamous, even when the husband has committed adultery ? —Lady Colin was not aware of it. Now, with regard to the letter from Lord Bland- ford, which was brought by a cabman, was not a I note brought ftom his lordship, and did not Lady Campbell object to give the answer to any other person than the cabman?—He was to deliver the letter, and it was to be taken to Lady Campbell's room. And he was to take it to her bedroom ?—I don't know that ho was to take it to her bedroom. He was to take it to her room. I don't know that the cabman went into her bedroom to get the answer. Was not the story about the cabman that after the man brought the letter Lady Campbell sent for him to taka the answer ?—Lady Campbell would not trust Lord Colin's nurse, Mrs. Duffy, as she knew Mrs. Duffy was only waiting for the letter. Therefore, she would not give the answer to any other person but the cabman. Was not the object of Lady Colin in sending for tho cabman to come up in order that she might give the answer herself to the man ?—Lady Colin preferred giving the answer to the letter to the cabman herself to prevent the matter becoming generally talked about in the house. The witness was cros>examined at some length as to the contents of the letter of the 22nd of Sep- tember, 1882, to Lord Colin in reference to the phrase, "I wish this horrid business could be amicably arranged." Do you say that had reference to adultery with Mary Watson ?—No. In writing to Lord Colin I thought I was writing to a man of honour. I have not kept a copy of aU my letters, and you, there- fore, have the advantage of me, as Lord Colin has apparently kept copies of all his letters. Will you tell me whether you told Mr. George Lewis that you had sent the letter to Lord Colin in regard to having seen adultery with Mary Watson as the reason for not appearing at the trial ?—I never told Mr. George Lewis about Mary Watson until after the interview. Did you tell Mr. Lewis that you had sent a letter of such importance to Lord Colin ?—Never. I told Lord Colin I could not appear at the trial, as I had a strong objection to give evidence in court. I regarded Lord Colin as my son. But you wrote the following to himM If it is nn«ihlK to keep me out of this wretched business, Srav do V I cannot tell you how sorry I am to appear." What was your reason for writing in that way?—Because it would be eminently dan- gerous to Lord Colin for me to give evidence. In the letter of..the 2nd of August, 1884, there occurs this passage If I were you, I would get rid of her (Lady Colin) by letting her divorce you if you could not divorce her." What did you njean by that ?—I referred to the story about Mary Wat- son with regard to him. I did not believe Lord Cohn could divorce his wife. I knew he had tried in every manner to find out something against her, but he did not succeed; Then there is another passageaS to his "getting a nice little woman for a companion." What do you mean to suggest by that ?-"I meant to suggest that litf would be in a better position than he was, Ii and that if he were in a position to marry he would be much happier. wiiat did you mean by asking in the letter to be placed in a position to help Lord Colin ?—That he should give me permission to speak to Lady Camp- bell on the subject of divorce. Now, madam, did you not suggest that Lord Colin Campbell should commit adultery in order to obtain a divorce ?—Lady Miles to this question gave her answer with the greatest indignation: I never suggested such a thing-such a heinous thing. How dare you ask me such a question ? I am a woman of honour. You have no right to put such questions to me. What do you mean by writing in one of your letters to Lord Colin, read yesterday, by stating certain matters, and the placing of Lady Colin Campbell in such position as to be enabled to get a divorce from him?—Why, by telling her about Mary Watson. Why did you not say so in so many words ?— Because I wrote the letter, and not you. (Laughter.) On the occasion of a conversation you had with Lord Colin, he made you believe that Lady Colin was suffering from miscarriage ?—Yes, he out it so forcibly. You knew Lord Campbell could not be the father?—I said. "You have not been with Lady Campbell for months." You thought the father some other man?— Lord Colin made me believe so. I was taken by surprise. I cannot say I actually believed it. The conversation did not last five minutes. I went up- stairs with feelings of surprise and indignation,and at once spoke to Dr. Bird. Cross-examined as to the miscarriage incident, Lady Miles said Lord Colin accused Dr. Bird of bringing about the miscarriage, aided by Dr. Hicks. She told Dr. Bird this. Do you mean to say that after this Dr. Bird con- tinued to attend Lady Colin merely on a statement made by you as to apology ?—I do not know what el.3" mt>.y have occurred between Lord Colin and Dr. Bird. In re-examination, Lady Miles stated that the story of the miscarriage was invented by Mrs. Duffy, Lord Colin's nurse. Lord Colin told witness that lie was trying all he possibly could to get information against Lady Colin to enable him to divorce her, but he failed. Lady Miles said, in reply to Sir C. Russell, that Lord Colin Campbell never pretended not to understand the letters, and never asked her if she meant to suggest his committing adultery. This concluded the case for the petitioner. Sir C. Russell, after Lady Miles left the box, said he wished to correct two errors in his opening statement—one that Sir Henry Thompson had a private hospital, which Sir Henry said was not the case, and the other was that Lady Colin had brought no fortune to her husband. As a matter of fact she brought him £6,000. LORD COLIN CAMPBELL'S CASE. Mr. Finlay then opened the case for the respon- dent. He said: It was a matter of irrepressible relief to Lord Colin to at last have the opportunity of defending himself in open court from the gross and cruel imputations which had been so long hanging over him. The jury now knew what evidence it was on which this trumped-up charge was made against Lord Colin Campbell, and their eyes had been opened to its character. The parties were engaged in 1880, and after that Lord Colin took a sea voyage to get. rid of an Eastern fever he had caught while in the East with Mr. Goschen. On his return from the voyage the marriage was brought, on the lapis. With regard to Lord Colin's health, he was suffering from a stricture, but his illness was in no sense of the term a venereal one. It was quite true that the stricture was the result of indiscretion many years previously at Cambridge. The state of "Lord Colin's health was an obstacle to the marriage, and both his surgeons advised him not to marry, not on account of any possible danger to his wife, but on account of danger to himself. These facts were communi- cated to Mrs. Blood, but she continued to urge on the marriage, saying that Lord Colin's state of health need be no obstacle, as her daughter would be perfectly satisfied to be his nurse only. Mrs. Blood wrote to the Duke of Argyll, who did not approve of the engagement, and had not at that time called on the Bloods or recognised Miss Blood in any way. The way Mrs. Blood urged on the marriage was inconsistent with the most elemen- tary sense of decency or propriety, and in an evil hour the marriage took place on July 21, 1881. It was for them to consider whether such a marriage was likely to be a happy one. The marriage was not consummated until nearly the end of November or the beginning of December, 1381, and for that Sir Charles Russell had denounced Lord Colin, and held him up to execra- tion as the basest of men for not being wiser than the two surgeons who had made these matters their special study. After that marital inter- course between Lord and Lady Colin Campbell was only very occasional, and it ceased altogether after tho 19th of June, 1882. He should next show what sort or a nurse Lady Colin made. In Sep- tember and October, 1881, Lord Colin was laid up in bed for a fortnight with » bad cold, but what did this young wife-not more than two months married—do ? She was out all day, dined out fre- quently, and had her own visitors and her own life. On that occasion she was called on by Lord Bland- ford (now the Duke of Marlborough), who remained with her for about an hour. Afterwards Lord Colin said to his wife in a pointed manner, I don't know Lord Blandford." She replied," Oh, we only had a talk about Gladstone." (Laughter.) In November, 1881, Lord Colin went to Scotland, and caught another bad cold, which made him extremely ill. Two days after that Lady Colin left him in bed and went on a visit to Lady Miles at Leigh Court. Lord Colin was ill again from December, 1881, to January, 1882; but on the 27tb of December Lady Colin left her husband in bed and went away again to Leigh Court. In fact, the title of "Lady Colin was only a warrant for that liberty which an unmarried woman could not have by the usagea of society. At Easter again she went to Leigh Court, and at that time Lord Blandford was there. Their bedrooms, either by accident or design, were next to each other. It was alloged that Lord Blandford committed adultery with Lady Colin during that visit to Leigh Court. On April 30 the visit came to an end, and then Lady Colin went to Paris with a party of friends, Lord Blandford being one of the party. They remained there until May 13. Lady Colin's'ekaperone was Lady Miles,and it was for the jury to consider whether the austere control of that estimable lady was suffi- cient to prevent mischief at Paris any more than at Leigh Court. In the following June Lady Colin came suddenly to London, and packed off her maid, Rose Abear to her home in Switzerland. That was a point which must be considered. He should call evidence to show that while Lord Colin Camp- bell was lying ill from the effects of an operation performed on him at Leigh Court Lady Campbell was continually running up to London from that place, and it was durihg that period that the alleged intimacy with Dr. Bird took place. Lady Colin only just looked in during the morning to Lord Colin's room, and during the remaining part of the day she was away, and was perpetually in the company of Dr. Bird, walking about in all sorts of weather, and, in fact, more of her time was given to him than was judicious. She was then cer- tainly fit for society, and during this time she was also known to visit Lord Blandford. On the return to Cadogan-place, after Lord Colin had sufficiently recovered, the alleged intimacy with Colonel Butler took place. He called one afternoon on the 13th of April. and went to the drawing-room, where he remained some hours. A lady friend of Lady Colin's called, and at this time Lady Colin, with hair disarranged and face flushed, called out to her maid that she was not at home, so the lady left without seeing Lady Campbell. After Colonel Butler had been in the house for over three hours, and although Lord Colin was then in his apartments, having returned meanwhile, he left in the most silent manner, slipping downstairs quietly on tiptoe- (laughter) —certainly not in the manner one friend would leave the house of another. That evening Lady Colin was taken ill. (Sensation.) Reverting again to the charge against Dr. Bird, he asked the jury whether it would be believed that any medical gentleman would, after the serious charge against him. remain in the house of the person making it without the most absolute apology and complete retraction of the charge, and felt certain that the theory that had been put forward on the point would not be satis- factory to the jury. He then referred to the illness of Lady Colin and the course that was pursued both by herself and Dr. Bird. Lord Colin at that time knew nothing; but she had a guilty con- science,and got Mr. Lewis to write a letter charging Lord Colin with communicating to her a disgust- ing disease, declining to live any more with him as a wife, but offering to remain in the house in separate apartments. Lord Colin refused, for he had never heard of the charge before. Lady Colin continued very ill indeed for three months, until the end of the month of April, 1883. The impres- sion made upon the minds of the women in the house at the time was that she was suffering from the effects of a miscarriage. Lady Miles is the intimate friend, the cousin, the confidante of Lady Colin. Lord Colin says to her, My wife has had a miscarriage." Lady Miles knew that they had not been living together as man and wife. She alleges that that miscarriage, if it be true, must be the result of adultery. Tliady Miles tried to modify that to-day, but the women in attendance have expressed the opinion that it was a miscarriage, and Lady Miles accepts for the time the idea that her cousin has committed adultery. Suppose, gentlemen, such a statement were made with regard to any one whom you knew as intimately as Lady Miles did Lady Colin, would you not say, The thing is impossible. I know my cousin would not be guilty of such a thing." But according to Lady Miles's own evidence she went upstairs to Lady Colin, thinking that this ghastly charge was true. An incident happened during this illness of which, I think, we are pretty well aware, but which will be further elucidated, if it be necessary, by evidence. That is the story of the cabman. You remember how, in her letter, Lady Miles says, "It looks very suspicious, sending for the cabman," And I must say that the story has aU the elements of suspicion about it. A hansom cab went to Lady Colin's with a letter from Lord Blandford to her, antf he was instructed to take the letter up to Lady Cohn's bedroom. The letter was sent up in the usual way. Lady Colin wrote a letter in answer to it at once, but she was resolved to take extraordi- nary precautions, so that no one in the house should know that she was sending to Lord Bland- ford. She sent the page boy downstairs, and told him to hold the cabman's horse, whilst the driver was told to go up to Lady Colin Camp- bell's bedroom. The cabman did not know what he waa going to do in the lady's bed- room but, upon getting nearer and nearer to Lady Colin's bedroom, he was told to" Come in," and. whatever feelings of delicacy the cabman had •(laughter)~were overruled, and be went into Lady Colin's bedroom, and received the letter from her hand. Lady Colin told him not to go any- where before he had delivered the letter, and to go direct back to Lord Blandford. The story of the cabman is not, therefore, at ail unimportant, and particularly when you find that Lady Colin directed him not to go to any other address to which he had been told to go, but to go back direct to Lord Blandford's house with this important and mysterious document. He then referred to incidents that took place on July 13, two days before the family meeting at Zion House, and said on that occasion Lady Colin Campbell came home late at night with a gentleman, who remained in the house for some time and then left. He then dealt with the proceedings at the Zion House meeting, and insisted that many of the letters that had been read during the proceedings had been written with the sole object of intimidating Lord Colin Camp- bell. He urged that the story of Lady Colin having suffered in her health through Lord Colin was a trumped-up charge of cruelty of an infamous kind, concocted for the purpose of screening a guilty woman by endeavouring to blast her husband's reputation, and so prevent him from coming into court to obtain what he and what she knew he was entitled to. The court at this stage adjourned till Monday. THIRD DAY. At eleven o'clock on Monday morning Mr. Justice Butt and a special jury, sitting in the Divorce Division of the High Court of Justice, resumed the trial of the consolidated actions of Campbell v. Campbell and Campbell v. Campbell, Marlborough, Shaw, Butler, and Bird, the same counsel appearing as before. As usual, the doors were besieged at an early hour by crowds of applicants for admission, but the official pre- cautions against overcrowding were carried out with admirable effect, and beyond those having business there or intimately connected with the parties to the actions, few were allowed to enter. His Lordship, on taking his seat, informed Mr. Finlay that Lady Miles's Prayer Book had been received by the Clerk of the Court, and Her ladyship having identified it, ¡ Mr. Finlay and Mr. Lockwood examined it. CONTINUATION OP MS. FINLAY'S ADDRESS. Mr. Finlay then resumed his address to the jury on behalf of Lord Colin Campbell. The learned counsel first adverted to the fact that he, on Saturday directed the attention of the jury to the married life of the parties and to the know- ledge of the Blood family prior to the marriage of I the illness of Lord Colin. He now intended to deal with that portion of the case in which it was j alleged that Lady Colin's health had suffered from her husband's conduct, and he would point out that no such allegation was ever breathed to Lord Colin until Mr. George Lewis had been consulted. Mr. Finlay was proceeding to argue out his point, when His Lordship ruled that he was estopped from traversing. The learned counsel then dealt with some of the letters written by Lady Miles to Lord Colin. Lady Miles had remarked that letters ought to have been kept sacred, and that she thought she was writing to a man of honour, and not to Lord Colin, a remark which carried the gallery with her. The fact was, Lord Colin was compelled to disclose them by Mr. George Lewis, who put them in evi- dence. The taunt came, too, with bad grace when Lady Miles herself introduced a letter she alleged having written to Lord Colin, and referring to the Mary Watson incident. Lord Colin would deny on oath having received such a letter. In another letter Lady Miles very severely commented on the conduct of the Blood family, and suggested that Lady Colin was acting in concert with Lord Blandford. Again, on the 9th of August she wrote and called the whole affair infamous. Later on she wrote," What a pity you ever met such a woman. Her's is a cold, pitiless, cruel nature, with no fear of God to guide her," and on the 17th of August she wrote that Lady Colin, when she spoke to her about her relations with her husband, gave reasons which I told her were not sufficient." Again, "She is behaving in a most senseless, indelicate manner, and the best thing for both will be a divorce." According to Lady Miles's own showing, Lord Colin had behaved with perfect kindness and propriety. The real version of the matter was that Lady Miles conveyed from Lady Colin a communication expressing her strong objection to cohabitation, because, it made her feel like a beast, and it was a noteworthy fact that a wife's repugnance to a husband was one of the first signs of infidelity on her part. In view of her expressed dislike, Lord Colin had promised never to force her, but he very properly repudiated the demand that he should sign a document contain- ing untrue statements and binding him to certain conduct for all time. A more unfair and odious proposal never was made. Its object was not legitimate; the aim was to give her a complete indemnity for her past and future misconduct. Dealing with the verdict given for Lady Colin in the previous suit, the learned counsel attributed it to the advocacy of Sir Charles and the fascinations of a beautiful woman, but he had now evidence which would shed a flood of light on Lady Colin's character, and he would leave it to the jury to say whether, if such evidence had been forthcom- ing on the last occasion, the verdict then given would not have been a different one. The fact was, Lord Colin in consummating the marriage acted on the advice of eminent medical men. Yet, by tho skill of advocacy, Sir Charles induced a jury to sav his conduct was reckless. Dealing next with the applications Lord Colin made to the Paris municipal authorities, counsel said, although they might not have been advisable, they were certainly usual in that country, and in full accord with French practice when a husband had reason to believe his wife could be taken under suspicious circumstances. Lord Colin did then believe his wife was in Paris acting improperly with Lord Blandford. He applied for a. summons. not a warrant, and the only effect could have been the imprisonment of the woman if, on inquiry, a magistrate found the charge of adultery proved. He asked the jury to discharge from their minds all preju- dice that might arise from the aspects erroneously placed on the transaction by Sir Charles. The fact was, the Paris incident had been distorted in order to take the attention of the jury from mate- rial facts of the case. Lord Colin had been attacked for having his wife's movements watched. He did so for good reasons, but, directly he knew her health was bad, as a man and a gentleman having regard for his wife, he ceased his inquiries. Before dealing with the allegation of adultery with Mary Watson he would state briefly the cases he had against the four co-respondents. The Duke of Marlborough was introduced to Miss Blood before her marriage. Lord Colin informed her of the objections be had to her having an acquain- tance with Lord Blandford (now the Duke of Marlborough), and if his lordship ventured to place himself in the box they would probably hear something as to the reasons for those objections. After the marriage Lord Blandford frequently called on Lady Colin at Cadogan-place, where the servants had instructions never to announce him in the hearing of Lord Colin. At the end of February, 1882, Lady Colin one night, with great demonstra- tions of affection, begged her husband to dismiss from his mind aU suspicions be might entertain in regard to Lord Blandford. Of course, it was difficult to refuse such a beautiful woman any request, but he did not like the fact of her keeping a photograph of Lord Blandford on her writing table. Once or twice Lord Blandford accompanied Lady Colin home late at night, and on one occasion they spent twenty minutes together upstairs. On another occasion a servant went to the room in which Lord Bland- ford and Lady Colin were alone, and found the door locked. While entering later attention was drawn to the disorderly state of Lady Colin's hair and the flushed faces of both of them. At Easter in 1882 the two occupied adjacent bedrooms at Leigh Court, a fact on which he could not compli- ment Lady Miles; and Lady Colin's maid would give evidence showing that Lady Colin did not occupy her bed alone, and that Lord Bland- ford was seen at the door. He would ask the jury to bear in mind, too, that Lady Colin's maid soon after that was sud- denly packed off to Switzerland. Again, evidence Would be given that Lord Blandford and Lady Colin stopped together two nights as man and wife at an hotel at Purfleet. A good deal of testi- mony would be given as to the great intimacy which apparently existed between the two. Lady Colin was perpetually calling at Lord Blandford's house, especially after her quarrel with her hus- band. The jury must draw their own conclusions from such conduct. He next came to the case of Mr. Tom Bird, a young unmarried surgeon. Lady Colin's intimacy with him first attracted attention between August, 1882. and Feb- ruary, 1883, when they were staying at Leigh Court. They were continually out together. Sometimes they paid brief visits to London, and once he took her to a concert, left his coat there, and it was returned to Cadogan-place as Lord Colin's pro- perty. Mr. Bird's visits to Lady Colin were unusually lengthy, and Lady Colin gave orders that when he was with her no one else should be admitted. In the early part of April, 1885, Lady Colin and Mr. Bird drove together to New Cross Hall, and the cabman would state he saw them caressing one another and acting as only lovers did. On the return journey Lady Colin stayed a very long time in Mr. Bird's own house in Brook street. Later on Lady Colin was very ill, and Mr. Bird was very attentive to his fair patient, stay- ing for hours by her bedside in a dark room. The jury would have all these matters dealt with in evidence. Captain Shaw was also a gentleman who knew Miss Blood before her marriage, and in October, 1881, she was with Captain Shaw alone In an unfurnished room for a very long time. After that he made frequent calls, staying for three- quarters of an hour and on one occaston, in June or July, 1882, when they were alone in the dining-room, a servant below being attracted by some knocking on the floor, went up, and saw both Captain Shaw and Lady Colin under very suspicious circumstances. The only allega- tion against the fourth co-respondent. Colonel Butler, was with reference to a long visit which he paid Lady Colin, just before her serious illness, under circumstances he detailed on Saturday. It was a grievous thing that a woman in Lady Colin's position should be charged with adultery with four men, but they must bear in mind the singular circumstances of the marriage, and the strange position she was placed in by her mother, who forced on the marriage with a full knowledge that it must for a long time be a marriage only in name. He now came to the charge of adultery preferred against Lord Colin himself. It. was, he submitted, founded on miserably weak and slender evidence, and it would never have been heard of had not Lord Colin insisted on bringing his complaints against Lady Colin into court. The charge was an infamous falsehood. It would be denied on oath by Lord Colin, Mary Watson, and other ser- vants in the house, and, feeling convinced it was a wicked conspiracy concocted by two shameless women, viz., Lady Miles and Lady Colin, they had had her examined by twosurgeons, who would say no man could ever have had connection with her; Lady Miles and Lady Colin were cousins and confidantes. They had concocted this story to slander a respectable servant girl. Her character was her only chance of life. Yet these two women had not blushed to do that which would entail the ruin of Lord Colin and a respectable girl..Was not that conduct of a scandalous and outrageous character? The triumph of wickedness was short, the day of reckoning was coming, and Lady Miles and Lady Colin would be exposed in their cruel, pitiless character. They had shown they were prepared to combine to give perjured evidence and to blast the character of a pure woman. As to the evidence of the marked Prayer Book, he did not hesitate to say that, that evidence was manufactured for the purposes of this case; and to suggest that the Prayer Book thouid have bean marked by her for the purpose • suggested—could they conceive a more revolting compound of devotion and of depravity ? The Prayer Book was prostituted in order to give a flavour of sanctity to their proceedings in con- cocting such an infamous conspiracy. He accused Lady Miles, further, of suggesting to Lord Colin that he should commit adultury to enable Lady Colin to get a divorce. Just before two o'clock Mr. Finlay completed his opening speech. He said for years Lord Colin had laboured under a weight of calumny almost insupportable. He saw the pick of the English Bar arrayed against him. But he had truth on his side, and he (the learned counsel) left the case with the most implicit confidence in the hands of II the jury, being sure they would decide it accord- ing to the evidence. Before adjourning for luncheon, the Judge inti- mated that he would not sit again cn this case until Wednesday. After luncheon evidence was taken. MEDICAL EVIDENCE. Dr: Clement Godson, of 9, Grosvenor-street, con- sulting physician of the City of London Lying-in- Hospital, and assistant physician accoucheur of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, deposed that that morning he examined Amelia, otherwise Mary Watson, and he had no doubt that she was virao intacto. Cross-examined by Mr. Inderwick. he said he saw no signs of attempt at intercourse. AMELIA WATSON. Amelia Watson said she was formerly in the service of Lord and Lady Campbell. She was called Mary in tha house. She was not now in service. It was not tru9 she ever sat on Lord Colin Campbell's knee, nor was there ever a.ny familiar intercourse. Lord Colin never took her hair down and played with it. She had never been insolent to Lady Miles. She remembered Lady Miles one afternoon toM her how to make linseed poultices for Lord Colin, and she took one up for his lordship. After Lady Miles had left the house she made three poultices for his lordship, and she spoke particularly sharp to her for not making them properly. Witness, continuing, said that when she entered Lord Colin's service the other servants were Roche, the butler; Anne Morrell, the cook; and Rose Baer, her ladyship's maid. Eaer always posted Lady Colin's letters. Witness saw them sometimes, and often noticed one for Lord Bland- ford, who also visited the house occasionally. There were letters, too, for Captain Shaw. Both he and Lord Blandford made lengthy visits to Lady Colin. On one occasion Mr. Bird and Lady Colin drove togother to a concert. After it Lady Colin informed witness that Mr. Bird had left his coat in the hall, and a day later the coat was brought to the house, the messenger stating it was Lord Colin's. The messenger had a letter written by Lady Colin which stated that the coat was Lord Colin's. Mr. Bird's servant subsequently called for the coat. Before going to the concert Mr. Bird was in Lady Colin's bedroom, and when witness wont to the door Lady Colin opened it, and at once called out, 14 Keep your hands on the dose, doctor." Mr. Bird teemed quite bewildered. She remembered Lady Colin being absent from town from Satur- day to Monday shortly after Lord Colin had gone on one of his visits to Scotland Witness said that, after leaving Lord Colin's- service, she went to Mrs. Robertson's at Brighton. when Mr. Lewis called on her and said Lady Miles had made an accusation against her with reference to her putting on poultices for Lord Colin and pulling down her hair. Nothing, however, was said about the date, or about her sitting on Lord Colin's knee. Before he left witness said, It's all Lady Colin's doings," and Mr. Lewis replied that she must get it out of her head that it. was Lady Colin's doings; it was, he added, Lady Miles' doings. Cross-examined by Mr. Inderwick: Mr. Lewis asked witness's mistress to be present at the inter- view. He told witness she was charged with intimacy with Lord Colin. Prior to that she had seen Mr. Humphreys' clerk, who also told her of the actions pending. She did not understand she was charged with adultery. Mr. Lewis asked her if she had seen any impropriety on the part of Lady Colin, and she said she had not. Witness did write to Lord Colin when he was at Leigh Court. She never signed herself" Your affectionate Mary," or anything to that effect. She wrote four or live times. She wrote to him about a pup he had sent up. Witness was next cross-examined as to her statement that she and Rose Baer watched Mr. Bird and Lady Colin drive away from the house one day, and that Lady Colin did not return, and she was compelled to admit that Rose wa.s not watching with her on that occasion, and she would not swear that was > not the occasion when, accompanied by Mr. Bird, she went to Leigh Court to join her husband. She had watched Lady Colin occasionally, but not with tha idea of catching ber in any impropriety. Witness had seen Mrs. and Miss Shaw at that house, as well as Captain Shaw. Up till the time witness left her ladyship seemed to be in perfect health. Cross-examined by the Attorney-General (who appeared for the Duke of Marlborough); Witness would swear she saw Lord Blandford visit the house three times, but could not fix too dates. She never knew Lord a.nd Lady Blandford to dine with Lord and Lady Colin Campbell. Lord Blandford called in the afternoon, and waa shown into tho drawing-room in the usual way. Was quite sure Mrs. Boltou was never present on any of the occa- sions. Mrs. Bolton was a frequent visitor. On one occasion, when she admitted Lord Blaudford, she went to her ladyship, who was with Lord Colin, and told her the cook wanted to see her. She did that because on the previous day she had heard Lord Blaudford had run away with some- body else's wife. Lady Colin was continually writing to gentlemen. I Re-examined by Mr. Finlay < She saw no dosa when Dr. Bird was iu Lady Colin's bedroom. When Lord Blandford called and Lady Colin was in Lord Colin's bedroom she told Ladv Colin that the cook wanted to see her, because she had heard that Lord Blandford bad run away with another man's wit'e. Dr. Gibbon, physician to the Grosvenor Hospital for Women and Children, corroborated Dr. H, Godson's evidence. ¡ The court adjourned till Wednesday, FOURTH DAY. Punctually at half-past ten on Wednesday morn- ing Mr. Justice Butt and a special jury resumed the hearing of the divorce causes of Campbell f. Campbell, and Campbell v. Campbell, Marlborough, Shaw, Bird, and Butler, the same counsel appear- ing as before. THE SWISS MAID'S EVIDENCE. The first witness called was Rose Fisher, the wife of Godfrey Fisher, a courier, living at Notting-hill. Examined by Mr. Searle she said: My name before my marriage was Rose Baer. I was formerly in the service of Lady Colin Camp- bell as lady's-maid. I went into her service some time in November, 1881, and stayed until the 4th of June, 1832. At the time I entered her Bervice Lady Colin was staying at her mother's, In Thur- low-square. Shortly afterwards I went with her to Lady Miles's, Loigh Court. We stayed there for five days, nnd tbpn returned. When we came to town we lived at 79, Cadogan-place. During the first part of your living in Lady Colin's service was Lord Colin unwell Yes; he had an operation performed, and his illness lasted for about six weeks. While you were At Cadogan-place did Lord Blandford visit the house ?—Yes. Often ?—Often. And at what time of the day were those visits generally?—In the afternoon, and Sometimes In the evening. He Used to be shown up to the drawing-room, whetf Lady Colin was, and he generally remained thoro fifteen or twenty minutes or half an hour. How long have you known him to remain?—The I longest was about an hour. Have you ever posted letters to Lord Blandford for Lady Colin ?—Yes. How often ?—Every day. 'I The Judge: For what length of time?—The whole time I was there with Lady Colin, and some- times of an afternoon, I took notes to his own I bouse, 46, Cadogan-square. Did Lady Colin go out of an evening much ?— Yes, nearly always of an evening—sometimes to dinner. Did you go out with her ?—No, not when she went out to dinner. (A laugh, i What time did she return?—Sometimes very late; between two and three in the morning. And when she did not go out to dinner you went with her?—Yes; her ladyship used to leave me at the corner of Font-street and Sloane-street. How far is that from Cadoga.n-square ?—About five minutes' walk. When you got there, what would she say ?—She used to tell me to go back. Did you notice what kind of dress she wore ?— Yes; she wore a dinner dress and a fur cloak. She was in the habit of wearing a thick veil over her face. and she carried a man's hat under her arm underneath the cloak. What sort of a hat do you mean ?—It was a man's bat. His Lordship: But a man wears more than one kind of hat. (Laughter.) What was its shape ?— It was round. His Lordship: Do you mean a crush hat. Per- haps you do not know the English name of it ?—I do not. Mr. Searle: Was it your duty to dress her ?— Yes and to undress her. What time did she generally return home?— About twelve o'clock. "His Lordship: What time did she go out ?— About half-past nine. Mr. Searle: Did she ever return later than that hour ?—Never. Did she drive or walk home ?—She used to drive to the corner of the street, and walk the remainder of the journey to the house in Cadogan-place. His Lordship: In what part of the street is No. 79 v—At the bottom. It is one of the small houses at the end of the street. How many houses are there at the bottom ? Are thero more than twenty ?—I do not know. Mr. Searle How could you tell that Lady Colin stopped the cab at the corner of the street?—I I heard it stop, and she would come in shortly afterwards. Do you recollect finding a broken tumbler in the drawing-room one night ?—Yes. Had Lady Colin been out that evening?—Yes. I cannot fix the time of that nearer than about Christinas, 1881. Delaroehe was the manservant at that time. I went with Lady Colin to Leigh Court at Easter, 1882. Where was Lord Colin ?—I think, in Cadogan- I place; not at Leigh Court. We stayed a week on that occasion. Was the Marquess of Blandford there?—Yes. When you arrived?—Yes, and he remained all the time we were there. What bedroom did Lady Colin occupy ?—No. 37 or 38. And Lord Blandford?—-His was the next room to it. Did they occupy those rooms during the whole of the visit ?—Yes. I to it. Did they occupy those rooms during the whole of the visit ?—Yes. Do you recollect finding anything in Lady Colin's bedroom ?—Yes; a white silk hanaker- II chief. Did you show it to Lady Colin?—Yea; ud aha' said, "I know who it belongs to," and she took it away. Do you recollect on one occasion, while you were attending Lady Colin, prior to her retiring to bed, noticing any thing ?—Yes; I heard someone coming upstairs. Lady Colin also heard the sounds, and she coughed. Where did the person go ?—In to the next room —that of the Marquess of Blandford, and, after her ladvship heard the door close, she told me I could go. Did you notice anything about the towels in Lady Colin's bedroom ?—Yes, I noticed they had been disarranged, they were thrown about any- where in the room. I noticed creases in the sheets. Do you think that more than one person had slept in the bed ?—Yes, I could see there had been two persons in it. Mr. Justice Butt: What time of day was this?— In the morning, my lord. Mr. Searle: Do you know of Lord Blandford being in Lady Colin's bedroom ?—Yes. Where was Lady Colin ?—She was also in the bedroom. What did you hear ?—I heard them talking toge- ther. The time of day was the afternoon. This only happened on one occasion. Where were you ?—I was outside. Do you remember one night that you ware brushing Lady Colin's hair ?—Yes, the time was twelve o'clock. Did you hpar anything then?—Yes, I heard somebody trying the door. What happened ?—Somebody tried the door and went away again. Mr. Justice Butt: Was the door locked?—No, it was not locked. Examination continued: I came to town with Lady Colin from Leigh Court. Did anybody come with you?—Yes, Lord Eland- ford. Lady Colin got into one carriage, and I got I into another. Did Lord Blandford and Lady Colin travel in the same carriage together to London?—Yes. I Was anybody else in the same carriage with them ?—I don't know nor can I say when they arrived in London. Afterwards Lady Colin went to Paris. I did not go with her. She went to Leigh Court without me. Did you ever notice tbe peculiar sort of key that Lady Colin had ?—Yes; it had a key at each end. I do not know where the key is now. Was there a back entrance to the house in Cadogan-place ?—Yes, and there was a latch-key to that. Who had that key?—Lady Colin. Amongst frequent visitors to Cadogan-place was Captain Shaw. How often did he come ?—1 saw him only twice. I once saw him walking up and down in Cadogan- place. I have posted letters to him from Lady Colin. Did that frequently happen ?—It did. I remem- ber two occasions. Take the first occasion. Who came home with her then ?—Lord Blandford. What time did she come home on that occasion? —It was between two and three in the morning. Where did they go to ?—In the dining-room. I do not. remember how long he remained. There was supper laid for them. I had to wait to undress I her ladyship. I cannot remember bow long I had to wait. What was the other occasion?—I don't know who it was came home with her. It was nearly twelve o'clock. I have no doubt it was a gentle- man from his voice. What room did they go into ?—The dining-room. There supper was laid. I cannot tell how long the gentleman stopped. Mary Watson was in service I at that time. Have you ever seen any impropriety whatever between Lord Colin ant] Mary Watson?—Never. As far as I could see, there was never anything in their conduct suspicious even. Did Lady Colin ever give yu. any directions about the letters that came to the house to ber ?— Yes. She told me I was not to leave them about in the hall, but to take them upstairs to her bed- room. To Mr. Justice Butt: Those were general direc- tions. Examination continued: Some of these she would burn, and others she would put away in a box under the bed. It was locked. Now, as to your leaving her service ?—On one occasion Lady Colin came back from Leigh Court unexpectedly. What was the date?—The 4th of June, 1882. Lady Miles was with her. I was called up into the drawing-room, where she and Lady Miles were. What passed?—Lady Miles told me I had blackened Lady Colin's character, and that I must leave the house at once. She said that she would send for a policeman if I did not go. Did Lady Miles say whero you were to go ?—No, I did not know where to go. Sbo said she did not care where I went, or what became of me, but I was to go at once. Did you ask for any further reason ?—No. Were your wages given yúu i'—Yes. Lady Colin came up and gave me £10, of which about £3 or £4 was due as wages. Was there anything said then as to what you were to tell tho other servants was the cause of your going ?—Lady Coiin said I was to tell the servants nay father was ill. The Judge; Well, where was your home'J.—In Switzerland. l Did Lady Colin say anything to you before you left?—Yes she said she always regarded me as a I sister, not as a servant, and she kissed me twice. (Lady Colin here smiled, and whispered to Lady Miles.) Did Lady Colin say anything about Lord Colin ? —Yes; Lady Colin said it was his lordship who was sending me away. Did you leave this country for Switzerland?— Yes; at six o'clock that evening. THE MAID CROSS-EXAMINED. Cross-examined by Sir Charles Russell: Mr. Humphreys two years ago wrote to witness for information about Lady Colin. Witness, in December, 1884. received a visit from Lord Colin at 11, Chesterfield-street, Mayfair, after Mr. Humphreys had sent two letters there which 6he did not answer. Lord Colin merely asked her to go and give evidence. She did not know what evidence she was to give, but eh9 agreed to give it, and he told her to go to Mr. Humphreys. She did so a week later, and her statement was taken down in writing. Sir Charles called for the statement. Mr. Finlay objected, on the ground that it was privileged, but, stung by a suggestion of Sir Charles as to the contents of the statement, he put it in with an indignant protest, and gave notice that he would not allow it to form a precedent. He handed in a statement which Sir Charles said was only a fair copy. Mr. Finlay said that the original was in shorthand notes. Continuing her cross-examination, witness said her examination in December, 1884, occupied two hours. She could not say whether it was taken in shorthand, but the paper she signed was the ouo the clerk wrote ou. Last month the statement was read over to her, and she made a second statement, which she signed. Witness would swear she was dismissed on the 4th of June, not on the 17th of July. Lady Colin did not accuse her of being reported speaking in an unpleasant way about Lord Colin's illness. Her ladyship had seen O'Neill before witness was called up, but ho did not tell her what he had been questioned about. Lady Colin did not tell witness she had advertised for a. place for her in the Morning Post. Lady Colin gave witness no reason for dismissing her, and witness asked for one. Her ladyship never gave her any character. O'Neill was told by her ladyship to get. French money to piy witness's travelling ex- penses home. Did tell Lady Colin she was sorry Ehc had been gossiping with the servants, but did not admit she had told lies. She wrote several times to Lady Colin, but never received any answer. It was not true she threatened to expose Lady Colin because she did not answer her appeals. Sho never wrote such a threat to Lady COlin. Sir Charles here read a sentence from the wit- ness's statement to Mr. Humphreys, in which she had written to Lady Colin stating that if her lady- ship would not give her a character to enable her to take a situation she would expose her. I To witness: Did you make that statement ?— Oh, yes, I did say that, but I recollect now it was a mistake. When did you find out it was a mistake ?—Only last week, when I thought the matter over. I told Mr. Johnson at Mr. Humphreys' only six weeks ago that I wrote the threatening letter, and I also then told him I did so because I wanted her to give me the character I thought I was entitled to. How often did Lord Blandford visit Cadogan- place?—On an average twice a week; always about the same time in the afternoon—between two and seven. Tha letters for Lord Blandford were handed to witness with Lady Colin's other letters. Her ladyship had a large correspondence. There was no secrecy about Lord Blandford's letters. On some days there were as many as three letters to his lordship. Witness's instruc- tions on the delivering of letters at Lord Bland- ford's house was to ring the bell and run away. When her ladyship took a man's hat under her cloak on going out it was her own hat. Witness thought it a suspicious act, and that she took it for the purpose of disguise. How often did it occur?—Two or three times. How often did you find her dress disarranged?— Two or three times. I cannot, give the dates. It was not the dress that was disarranged. It was the petticoat that was undone. That was the sole reason you gave for the state- ment that she must have had her dress off V—I did not mean the petticoat was undone; it was the skirt which was undone. Did you have suspicions as to Lady Campbell's conduct with anyone besides Lord Blandford ?— No. Further cross-examined as to her statement to No. Further cross-examined as to her statement to Mr. Humphreys, witness said that though in that she said Lady Colin and Lord Blandford occupied adjoining rooms at Leigh < ourt at Christmas, 1831, it was a'mistake; she was then referring to the Easter visit. Sho was positive Lord Blandford was at Leigh Court at Christmas, 1831, but she could not remember the numbers of the bedrooms then occupied. Further cross-examination disclosed other dis- crepancies between the witness's statement to Mr. Hurnphrevs and her present evidence. The Judge: One can scarcely forbear asking howshecamo to make such statements. Sir Charles Russell: Was it an invention or a mistake ? Witness: A mistake. t Witness said that on returning from the Christmas visit to Leigh Court Lord Blandford and Ladv Colin sat on a seat at Paddington Station looking 'like two lovers very unhappy at their parting. On the resumption after luncheon some delay was caused by the non-return of the witness, who had fainted away during the interval. She, how- ever, was able to take her seat in the witness-box. t Witness, cross-examined, said that, though she told Mr Humphreys Lady Colin had a peculiar key for Lord Blandford's house, she had not heard any- one say that. It was pure assumption on her part. I How often did you post letters from Lady Colin to Captain Shaw ?—About one or two a month. I ( will swear Captain Shaw was at Leigh Court either at Christmas, 1881, or Easter, 1882. Will you sav Lord Bhndford was there at Christmas, 1831 ?—Yes. You are certain?—Yes. You told Mr. Humphreys that because Lady Colin did not sleep with her husband she was bad J after men. What did you mean ?—I thought she used to run after men. When did that idea first come into your mind? —A long while ago. Why did you not state it to Mr. Humphreys in 1884 ?—I was not married then, and did not like to. In fact, I did not remember it then. Why in your statement in December, 1884, did you introduce Mary Watson's name, and say she would hardly look at a man?—Because Mr. Humphreys told me it was charged that Lord Colin had committed adultery with ber at Christmas, 1881, at Leigh Court. Did not. Lady Colin occupy bedroom No. 36 ?— No. I What room did she occupy ?—I do not know. Do you swear Lord Blandford was at Leigh Court at Christmas, 1331 r- Yes; positively. Was not the bali at Easter ?—No at Christmas. What was the number of Lady Colin's room at I. Easter, 1882 ?—Either 37 or 33. Was not the number of the room at the Easter visit 29 r—No, I do not think so. Was not 23, intended for Lord Colin, empty ?— I do not know. Was not 30 occupied by Sir Philip Miles ?—It is not true. I am perfectly sure Lady Colin occupied 37 or 38. Was not Lord Blandford's room at the Easter visit No. 37?—Either 37 or 38. He had one of them, Lady Colin the other. I am sure the room Lady Colin occupied at Christmas was in a corner, and at Easter it was not. Was tho room over the portico entrance ?—No, I am sure. What did the window look out on ?—I cannot say. It looked over the park. By the Attorney-General (representing the Duke of Marlborough) Did not know that in February, 1882, Lcrd and Lady Colin Campbell dined with Lord and Lady Blandford. Did not know Lord Blandford lent Lady Colin books. Lady Colin went to a charity bail at Clifton at Easter, 1882. During that visit to Leigh Court there was no bail at Leigh Court. How many nights was Lord Blandford there &t Easter, 1882 ?—1 cannot say. I Was it more than two ?—I cannot say. Did Lord Blandford return to Leigh Court after the charity ball?—Yes; I saw him at the Court after that. Re-examined by Mr. Finlay: She never heard of an advertisement being inserted in tha Morning Post of July 17 for a situation for her, It was not put in for her. Until that day she never heard it euggosted that the cause of her dismissal was that she had talked about Lord Colin's illness. She believed she wrote a letter threatening to expose Lady Colin, but never sent it. O'Neill did not enter Lord Colin's service till just before Easter, 1882, and until then she had never seen him. The court adjourned at ten minutes past four o'clock.

ACCIDENT TO LADY COLINI CAMPBELL.

! CHARGE OF FRAUD AGAINST…

-! THE CARDIFF ACCOUNTANT…

CARDIFF BANKRUPTCY COURT.!

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CARDIFF IMPARTIAL SOCIETY.…

MEETING OF WELLS' CHAUITST…

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