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- THE STATE OF IRELAND.

; MORE FASTING.

THE PRIZE FIGHT FOR THE j…

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Hi!".. THE CONVEYANCE OF THE!…

TELEGRAPH CLERKS AND THE ROYAL…

-----THE DEFICIE^OYON THE…

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THE RAID ON BOGUS CLUBS.

GRANGETOWN BRIDGE COMMITTEEj

MURDER AND SUICIDE AT SHEFFIELD.

FATAL FIRE IN LONDON,

THE MAIDEN LADY AND HERI PASTOR.I

MR. WILSON BARRETT IN AMERICA.

SUICIDE OF A FARMER NEAR DERBY.¡

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THE ACTION FOR LIBEL BY SIR…

ALLEGED HORRIBLE CRUELTY AT…

.---DISASTROUS GAS EXPLOSION…

SHOCKING DEATH OF ABRIDEGROOM.

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THE TITHE AGITATION.

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THE TITHE AGITATION. A CHANGE FOR THE BETTER. We learn that the audits for the receipt of tithe rent-charges payable to the Ecclesiastical Com- missioners in tha parish of Pendoylan, Llantrisant,, Llantwit Vardre, and elsewhere have been held within the last few days, and that the attendance 1 of payers was even better than usual. In the two first-named parishes petitions for allowances were presented, but the payers were informed that the Commissioners were not in a position to make any abatement. CONFERENCE AND MEETING AT LIVERPOOL. 1 On Tuesday a conference in Liverpool, attended by delegates from every place of note in Wales and by Welsh members of Parliament, passed resolutions to the effect that, in the present state of agricultural depression, it was necessary: that there should be an alteration in the tithe system, which was unjust to the Welsh people, but, which could not be satisfactorily dealt. with except in connection with the Disestablishment of the Church in Wales that Disestablishment in Wales could not any longer be excluded from the objects of the Liberal party, and that the agitation in the Principality for that purpose be carried on with increased vigour. In the evening a very largely attended meeting was held in the Rotunda-hall, William Brown- street. Mr. L. L. Dillwyn, M P., occupied the chair, and there was again a number of Welsh representatives on the platform. Letters were read from Mr. Osborne Morgan, M.P., and Mr. Henrv Richard, M.P., who were unable to attend through indisposition. Both lion, members wrote strongly in favour of Disestablishment. Dr. Thomas moved a resolution acknowledging the valuable services rendered by Mr. Stuart Kendel, M.P., to the cause of Disestablishment in Wales by his appeal to Mr. John Morley to make an explicit declara- tion as to the future attitude of the Liberal party. It also expressed the greatest satisfaction at the important declaration made by Mr. Morley.—Mr. A. C. Humphreys Owen, of Montgomeryshire, seconded the resolution, which was carried with enthusiasm.—The meeting was also addressed by Mr. Stuart Rendel, M.P., Mr. S. Smith, M.P., Mr. T. Ellis, M.P., Mr. Rathbone, M.P., and others. THREATENED DISTRESS IN FLINT- SHIRE. I The struggle between the Ecclesiastical Com- missioners and the Welsh Anti-Tithe League has begun in the parish of Whitford, Flintshire, where some farmers, including the chairman of the Farmers' Club, have received the statutory ten days' notice that their goods will be sold. The action of the Commissioners will be resisted. LETTER FROM THE BISHOP OF OXFORD. The Bishop of Oxford has written the following letter in answer to an address from Berkshire farmers asking his lordship to press the clergy to remit 25 per cent. of their tithes :— Cuddesdon, Nov. 29. My dear Sir,—In reply to your tatter I must assure you that I am very sensible of the respect and trust implied in the readiness of the Berkshire tarmers to take Counsel with me on the subject of the distress under which they are suffering. They are quite right in their belief that I enter heartily into their trouble and that I would gladly, adopt any rational plan for the relief of it. I know how loyally many of them serve the office of church- warden and in other ways promote the good of the parishes in which they live; and I should be ungrateful if I did not, as bishop of the diocese, take every opportunity of acknowledging the value of their help. The tithe-owners are also very important and valuable members of the diocesan community and I must try to look at the question iu u. spirit of candour and justice to both classes, 1. I do not understand why your memorial dis- tinguishes the "pastors of the diocese from lay- men who.are owners of tithe. Lay tithe-owners have not been obliged to pay for an expensive education as the clergy have, they have no obliga- tion to reside on the land which pays them tithe; nor have they any duties to perform. It looks as if their freedom from those and other like deduc- tions from profits would make it equitable that they should abate a very much larger amount ot their tithe than that which the clergy are asked to sacrifice. Possibly the memorialists agree in this view; but they do not say so. 2. I feel that I should not help your cause by advancing arguments on your behalf to whicn practical and well-informed persons would pay no attention. The plea that a thousand years ago in some parts of Europe some tithes were given partly to the repair of churches or to the support of the poor can have no bearing on present obligations of English tithe-owners. Lay tithe-owners, it is true, obtained possession of their property at a much later period; but they too have Jong since acquired a good title to it. It is of little use to go behind the Act of 1836, nor is it likely that anyone who has signed the memorial has any interest of an older date than this. We must look at facts. 3. It will be said, then, by the tithe-owner that the Act of 1836 ratified an arrangement between himself and the titlie-payer by which both were gainers. It was felt that the old plan of taking a tenth of the produce of the land had vexatious incidents from which a corn-rent would be free. The tithe-ownnr gave up his right to tithe the pro- duce of newly-cultivaied land he had some com- pensation in the improved mode of recovery and in the abatement of excessive fluctuations in the amount of his income. It was a bargain to which both parties agreed, and by which both hoped to be gainers. I shall be asked whether this bargain is to be set aside in the interests of one party only nnd without joint consent; what am I to say? If I reply that Parliament can over-ride any bargain, they would naturally reply that this would be unfair—but that whether fair or unfair, until Parliament alters it, the bargain stands. To this I can and no answer which I can decently give. 4. Assuming, however, that the bargain was unjust and that it ought to be cancelled (which he does not admit), the tithe-owner asks me what is to happen in the event of a sudden recovery of the prices of agricultural produce from a great dis- coverv of gold or any other cause. He says that in 1868 he received only £100 134" although the actual value of that year was JE125, and the tithe- payer did not make up to him any part of the loss of 25 per cent. on that year. Of course he did not, because the system of a septennial average provided that the loss of one year should be compensated for by the gain of another. If the tithe-owner is to be forced to surrender a quarter of his income in 1886, will the tithe-payer guarantee him against an equal, or greater, loss by the possible operation of the averages in years to come? Here, again, 1 do not know what answer to give. 5. Probably, however, you are not much dis- posed to enter into these arguments. Briefly, you wish the tithe-owner to understand that the tithe- payer is in distress, that he must be helped to get out of it, that the tithe-owner is able to help him. The tithe-owner replies that all tithe-owners are not rich and all tithe-payers are not poor, that there are some clergymen so poor that they cannot find means to pay their rates and other charges on their income—heavier charges than those which are levied on other kinds of pro- perty—and that they are utterly unable to afford pocial and personal expenses which some of the neighbouring tithe-payers seem to defray without difficulty. I can only say to them in reply that I know very poor farmers too. But, then, it is answered that a return of 25 per cent. all round would be quite unreasonable. What would be kind and fair on the part of a rich tithe-owner dealing with a. poor tithe-payer would be unfair and irrational on the part of a poor tithe-owner dealing with a wealthy payer of tithe. It is, after all, a matter of personal charity between rich and piot- in each particular case. Certainly tho clergy ought not to be backward, according to their means, in considering the poor and needy; and I do not think that they are. 6. The question of present "purchasing power" of money is one which I am not competent to discuss. Personally, I know that, although bread is cheaper, I pay much more for meat, poultry, and many other kinds of produce than I paid years ago, and that in many other branches of expendi- ture the period of agricultural depression has brought no saving to mo. How it is with others I cannot tell. 7. If you think that I can be of service to you by meeting a small committee of practical and well-informed farmers for the consideration of the present distress, I will gladly meet them. I can- not think for a moment that honest Berkshire farmers would propose to me, or to one another, to "combine and resist the payment" of lawful debts; nor, if such a conspiracy were found to exist, could I advise any Englishman to submit to it, much less to give it his nid. Let me again say that in taking any course which is lawful and right you may count on me as your friend.—I am, yours most truly, J. F. OXON. G. Bayiiss, Esq. WAGING THE WAR WITH DYNAMITE. TO THE EDITOR OF THE "WEEKLY MAIL." SIR,—1 send you the translation of a Welsh anonymous letter I received recently, showing how Irish notions have been imported into, and have apparently taken root in, hitherto peaceful, law- abiding Wales:— Mr. Wil1\am8,-Sir" this note is a warning to you to inform you that if you do not make a reduction of £25 per cent. in the tithe of your parish your bouse, your- self, and all you possess will be dynamited and blown up, Whitt will a man give in exchange for his life ? Tube this as a warning, for in the hour y"u think not the Son of Man will come. ("The Lord Rpigneth.") Justice to Wales.—Yours, Two HOME HunM. WELSH. DKTEHMIN*D. We are willing and determined to sacrifice our lives for the rights of our country (Wales and Welsh for «ver). I cannot sav I was alarmed, but must ndmit to being much unnerved by the above cowardly letter, as it reached me at a time when I had re- ceived a severe shock by the total destruction by fire of my church and all its contents. I think such a dastardly attempt at intimidation ought to bo made public. I have offered a reward for such information as will lead to the conviction of the evil-minded author. The matter is in the hands of the police.—I am, &c., < WM. YENABLES WILLIAMS. The Vicarage, Colwyn Bay, N.W.

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GRAND BAZAARS AT CARDIFF.

llOATH-HOAD CONGREGATIONAL…

THE TYNM V. THE TAFF.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT BOARD INQUIRY…

SNOWSTORM IN NOWCn WALES.

FOUR THOUSAND WEAVKfiS LOCKEE…

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HEAVY FINES AT PENARTH.