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THE ACTION AGAINST THE SWANSEA…

1-'-LOSS OF A CARDIFF-LADEN…

! DARING BURGLARY NEAR BRISTOL.

ACCIDENTS IN THE FOOTBALL…

MURDEROUS ASSAULT ON A POLICE-OFFICEH.…

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! THE TITHE AGITATION. I

A PLEASANT REXr AUDIT.

iTWENTY-ECVK PER CENT. IiEDUC!TION…

I'CRICKHOWELL.

IMONTGOM RHYS HIRE.

A CHESHIRE CLERGYMAN'S BALANCE-SHEET.

LLANGELER. !

CLYDEY, PEMBROKESHIRE.

LL AND YFR [OG, CARDIGA NSHIRE.

ST. i >AYID'S.

LLANEGRYN.

LLANFAlH NANT-Y-GOF.

---SUNDAY SCHOOL FESTIVAL…

A BISHOP'SEXPI':RIEC¡': AS…

FIRE AT A GLASGOW OIL WAREHOUSE.

---------. ALARMING FIRE AT…

AN EXTRAORDINARY WALKING FEAT.

I NAVAL VOLUNTEER ARTILLERY…

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I NAVAL VOLUNTEER ARTILLERY I PRIZE DISTRIBUTION AT BRISTOL. I ADDDESS BY THE ADMIRAL OF THE FLEET. On Saturday afternoon the prizes gained by the members of the Bristol Detachment Bristol Brigade Royal Naval Volunteer Artillery were distributed at the Colston-hnlI by the Admiral of the Fleet, the Hon. Sir Henry Keppel, in the presence of a very large assemblage of spectators. Admiral Keppel was received on his arrival by a. guard of honour of the Bristol Volunteer Engineers, under Captain Lewis, while the staircases were lined with mem- bers of the Naval Volunteers. Lieutenant-Commander SAYCE, in opening the proceedings, said it was indeed a very great honour for the Bristol Channel Brigade lioyal Naval Volunteers to have the distinguished Admiral of the Fleet, the well-known Sir Henry Keppel, to present their prizes. H;: felt sure his coming there would do a great deal to popularise the Naval Volunteer movement through- out the country. (Hear, hear.) The present strength of the Britol ChanneJ Brigade was about 600, upwards of 400 belonging to Bristol and more than 200 to Swansea, thus showing that in three years the corps had trebJed its sttength, und had in the same period trebled the number of its officers. He did not wish to take up their time, as they would hear someone speak presently whom he was sure they would rather listen to, but he would just say that he believed there was no corps in the United Kingdom which could show such an extra- ordinary record of attendances at drill as that corps could show, and he was prepared to take a gun's crev from one of their batteries to Ports- mouth or Plymouth, and pay their expenses, to compete with .any gun's crew on board her Majesty's ships. vApplause.) The volunteers, who mustered some 400 of all ranks, were then put. through the manual and firing exercises by Sub-Lieutenant Milton Lewis acting officer instructor); the sword bayonet exercise under Sub-Lieutenant Withington cutlass drill under Sub-Lieutenant Elmes; attack and defence and loose phy under Sub-Lieutenant Naish. Admiral Sir HENEV KKPPKD, who was received with applause, said he could not well express how flattered lie felt at being called upon on that occa- sion to distribute the prizes, which he was quite sure were well deserved. He was afraid he was addressing men who were a generation after his time, for he was in the service in the days of the good old wooden walls, when ships were propelled by ropes and sails, but his interest in the grand service to which they all belonged was as great as ever. He had been in the habit of witnessing drill on board their different training ships as well as having commanded at Plymouth sotne years :;go,but he had never seen men go through their exercises with more goodwill or unity than upon the pre- sent occasion. (Applause.; Where thero was so much general efficiency it was puzzling to him how they could find so many who were more de- serving than others of prizes. lie would like to have given them all prizes, but that, of course, was not possible. (Laughter.) It was now five years since he saw the volunteer review in Windsor Great Park. He remembered Lord Brassey, then Sir Thomas Brassey, who was in command of the Naval Brigade, riding by on horseback, with a crown and anchor worked on his saddle cloth, a thing never before witnessed upon any part of a horse's accoutrements, and which, of course, caused a good deal of amusement, but the brigade also caused a good deal of interest when it marched past the Queen. (Hear, hear.) Nobody of men who passed her Majesty were more perfect than they were upon that occasion, and from that time everyone was satisfied they would grow into what they were now, a most efficient and useful corps. But he was hardly surprised at that when he referred to his friend, Commander Sayce, who served with him in China twenty years ago, and who at that time showed such zeal for the service tnat me service regretted ins retirement from it. He was sure, however, that he did a great deal of good in the service in which he now took such a very great interest, in having brought those under him to the state of efficiency in which they now were. The use of the Naval Volunteers was more than he could explain, more perhaps .than they were aware of themselves. He happened to meet the Chancellor of the Exchequer the other day, and when lieexpiiiiied to him the use of the Naval Volunteers ha rubbed his hands as much as to say, "That will save me a great deal in ttie number of ships required to guard our coasts." At present they were only in their infancy, but if they went on improving at the rate they had for the last dozen years they would afford the country more help than they were aware of. He was not at all afraid of their coast defences while they had the volunteers, but their great enemy was famine, which might happen some day. They had not more than six weeks' provisions in the country, and by guarding their coasts they would enable the Admiralty to send out last cruisers to protect their merchant ships. anll that would be one of the greatest aids which they could render. (Hear, hear.) Admiral Close did not give him sutticient notice or he might have got one of the Royal Princes down there. He had tho honour of being with the Prince of Wales the other day, and his Royal Highness told him Priuce Edward was in the middle of his studies, from which he could not be removed, but tie would have come if it had been possible. Tho Prince added that he wished his sailor bov, Prince could have come with him (tho admiral; to Bris- tol. (Applause.) He was not going to make a speech, because it was not their peculiarity— (taughtar)—saving and excepting Admiral Close, who was close behind liitti-(Iau.-Itter)-;iiid o had attained efficiency in that respect. He hoped .hey would koup us strong an opinio u £ ilicin- selves as everyone else had. Iu his ypnng^days they considered that, one Englishman wi|s equal to three of any other country, and they had no idea what power and strength that- thought gave them. (Hear, hear.) Ho should make it a point of reDorting to the Admiralty the state of efficiency in which he had found them, and he would also explain one or two little matters which they required. (Hear, hear.) He thought they should have a gunboat entirely to them- selves, for they were likely to be of little use with- out, one. He was an old man, and he was afraid he should not appear there again. It was uianv years since he had addressed a gathering like that before him, but they must take the will for the deed, and accept his hearty good wishes. (Ap- plause.) The prizes were then distributed to the successful competitors by Admiral Keppel. Admiral CLOSE congratulated them, as Com- mander Sayce had done, upon their conduct at Milford Haven, where for the first time they were connected with the Royal Navy, and showed them- selves worthy of the name they bore. The proceedings shortly after terminated.

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