Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

44 articles on this Page

CARDIFF WELSH SUNDAY SCHOOL…

News
Cite
Share

CARDIFF WELSH SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION. PUBLIC MEETING, r ADDRESSES BY PROFESSORS KOBERTS AND POWEL, MR. D. ISAAC DAVIES, &c. } 1. Public meeting in connection with the Car- it Welsh Sunday School Union was held at the Chapel on Tuesday evening. ere was a fair attendance of the leaders of the ^e'sh Language Movement," together with the and teachers of the Welsh Sunday Schools Cardiff. The proceedings were conducted Purely in Welsh. The chair was occupied by °fessor Roberts, of the University College, rc^ff (the president of the union), who was PPorted by Mr. D. Isaac Davies, Professor oWel, Rev. J. Morgan Jones, Rev. T. T. Jones, Jtc. The meeting was opened with the reading of chapter and a prayer, and several well-known elsh hymns were sung at intervals. The CHAIRMAN, in his opening remarks, ex- fessed great pleasure at seeing such a large rthering before him. It showed, he thought, at. considerable interest was felt in this move- ent amongst the Sunday Schools of Cardiff. In days a good deal of consideration was given -? tnatters affecting the Welsh people, their educa- and their future, religiously and nationally amongst other things that had been under nSlderation was the attitude they should adopt j. *ards the Welsh language. There was at one a tendency to let the course of events decide patters in regard to the Welsh language, but to- L y they had cooie to the plan of considering what 'th*9 ^St 10 110 ^one- was » matter that affected in Cardiff more directly than in morn Welsh rts-what should be done with the children of parents attending Welsh places of who grew up in peril of ignorance of • language in which the religious ser- vices were carried on ? They felt that would be a great loss to the children to be -Plated from the religious life of their parents, d their relation to the history of religion in Wales inl? -*n Per^ being different from that which Insisted between their parents and that history, the ignorance of the language -would stand *e a Wan between the children and that history. he went on, it was specially important that children should know the history ■ of the j*" £ ious life that had been lived in Wales. t was, perhaps, more interesting than Y other chapter in the history of religion in tro l°gdom in the same period. (Applause.) There hQ, been more religious life in Wales, a mohe I "Writual feeling, and the blessing of God had been, more manifest than in any other part of kingdom. There was a danger of these children sing the benefits of the Welsh pulpit, the in- *tence of the Welsh Sunday School, and iter • P*easure and profit of perusing the J'gioua literature with which Wales was richly endowed. (Applause.) The Welsh Sun- |jj y School Union intended providing against this ^endeavouring to promote the study of the 1 language amongst the Sunday School iolars, and, with this object in view, they pro- T^sed introducing duoglott books, which should, ,}*, giving Scriptural quotations, promote a know- of the Bible, and enable the pupils to learn elsh and see by the English text the ^aning of what they were reading. (Applause.) believed this movement would be successful, t) be thought he saw in this Cardiff Welsh g nday School Union the nucleus of a Sunday j, nool Union for the whole of Wales. (Applause.) was nothing in its constitution to prevent denominations joining it. (Applause.) They "^ded promoting the teaching of Welsh reading k? Titing and singing. Those were the principal ]ects. W DAN ISAAC DAVIES, the secretary of the then spoke. He said a new era dawned in the history of Wales. (Applause.) u/e feeling which very generally prevailed in Past was that the course of the Welsh language nearly run, but matters were getting different khT' Education was spreading in every parish, they were looking forward to the establish- Schools, 4c., yet people were out that the Welsh was not a hindrance a help to them in their daily life, and some of complained that it was not recognised as it Uld be by Government. (Applause.) They only themselves to thank, however, and in instanced a payment of £ 5 a year jw to every Welsh teacher who succeeded in #lng an examination in Welsh at the time |^en be (Mr. Davies) was in College. That grant j§L abolished by Mr. Robert Lowe (now Lord ji. brook), and, though the Welsh people com- «yp.lned about many other things, not one ^k.Ca was raised in protestation against abolition of that grant. What wonder, if Englishmen and the English Government the Welsh people did not care for the *eci i lan*ua £ e ? (Applause.) He dwelt upon the u asPect t^10 question because other watiIerS wou^ with the religious aspect; ^1 he would point out that the Welsh was a help students who wished to acquire other jj. ^Uages. Let them ask any of the mis- ifca3arF societies who were the men who be- most proficient in preaching in the native guages of the countries to which missionaries ere sent, and they would find that the. reply » OQld be Those who understand two languages," Cb as the Welsh, the Scotch Highlanders, and ilQe Swiss. (Applause.) Several children then recited and sang Welsh by ay of illustrating the objects to be obtained by 8Q8 union. Mr. T. ROBERTS, Docks, and Mr. T. BROWN spoke J'be difficulties they had overcome in teaching to their children. J professor POWKL then moved a resolution, ^.oicing at the formation of a Welsh Sunday School i. for Cardiff, and wishing it success, rttPPlause.) He said he had lived three years in j<j^.erP°°l. and he was sorry to say that the con- !\>0°npf things in regard to Welsh was much tolrt86 in Cardiff than in Liverpool. He had been >hk ^at there was one Sunday School in Cardiff the Ut a sins^ Welsh class in it, but far'0 25 or 30 schools in Liverpool, and, so tta?8 be knew, there was no class in any of them **>e Was no' ^e'sb- Some people said this move- Was 0De sen^ment» but he considered it IW one of importance. It was incumbent upon parents to do one of two things—either j^?b Welsh to their children or go with their jw'.uren to an English place of worship, they should do was a matter for to determine. He knew for him- that he should consider it a wrench Co nave to sever all the old Welsh associations. To jqj e from Pantycelyn to the sacred songs and of Mr. Sankey would, he considered, be down a good deal. (Applause.) Was it !¡ Orth making an effort to retain the language ? lit considered it was, and that it only required a perseverance to succeed. Almost up to the the Sunday School had been the only i^rsity College Wales had had—(applause)— jj/* although h« did not wish to depreciate to ^^tional advantages now being extended y ales, he ventured to say it would take a great I?*1 of labour on the part of educationists to do (A for Wales as Thomas Charles had done. Pplause./ He went on to speak of the special L^cteristic. of the Welsh Sunday Schools, and cpd they were superior to the English schools. They attended by adults and old people as well as tOng, whereas the English schools were attended children only. If the status of the Sunday to bOola of Wales fell, then the ministry would have la be lowered to the same level. The change of tr llguage so often spoken of was, he considered, j^ght with danger. (Applause.) When the J^°Ple became Anglicised in language they j°pted English habits. In some places horse had taken the place of school gatherings, Md though this sort of thing might be con dered an advance in civilisation-(Iaughter)-he J?|d prefer the old custom. (Applause.) Ihe J°NES> Pembroke-terrace,seconded resolution, and corroborated Professor Powel's s., as to the superior character of the Welsh Schools. The resolution was then put and carried. fhe Rev. E. REES (" Dyfed ") moved a resolution ^Ppealing to Welsh parents in Cardiff to teach liw cbi'dren Welsh at home, and, in the course of .Pointed speech,dwelt upon the warm attachment hich Cambrians from home felt towards their d language and institutions. ev. J. DAVIES seconded the resolution, and it agreed to. it> v. T. T. JONES moved a resolution, and Mr. ^ETn~ON seconded, calling upon Welsh churches iy, that the members of their congregations ^aerstood the language in which the services were °)^ucted. v Ahi8 also was carried, and the meeting was Ol.1ght to a close with the usual votes of thanks.

CARDIFF FREE LIBRARY AND MUSEUM…

[No title]

A VINDICATION OF THE CARDIGANSHIRE…

DEATH OF SIR JOHN ANDERSON.

THE HEALTH OF MR. RUSKIN.

SUDDEN DEATH OF A GOVERNMENT…

WOUNDING CASE AT SWANSEA.

[No title]

MR. LLEWELYN'S SEAT AT I PENLLERGARE.'

THE CAMBRIAN ARCHAEOLOGICAL…

SOUTH WALES CHORAL UNION,

RENT REDUCTION IN WALES.

;; I.BANGOR ORDINATIONS.

NEW PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH AT…

WINDING ACCIDENT AT FERNDALE.

^ "MABO^'S" ELECTION EXPENSES.

PENARTH BOAT CLUB REGATTA.

THE LLANDAFF CLERGY CHARITY.

A ROYAL SUPPER PARTY ON THE…

THE WELSH CONGREGATIONAL UNION…

ALARMING FIRE AT LLANGOLLEN.

TERRIBLE FATALITY AT A THEATRE.

TRESPASSING ON THE GREAT WESTERN…

iTHE ALLEGED OUTRAGE ON A…

! THE VOLUNTEER CAPITATION…

1 THE STRANDING OF A TUG ATI…

1THE MANCHESTER SHIP CANAL.

[No title]

WEDDING FESTIVITIES AT GLAN-YR-ELWY,…

ELECTION OF PROCTORS FOR THE…

:ALLEGED FRAUDS ON THE POST-IOFFICE.

NEWPORT TOWN COUNCIL.

FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE j RHYMNEY…

DR. MILLER COMMITTED TO PRISON.

[No title]

SHOCKING TRAGEDY AT) PENZANCE.'-;

THE EARTHQUAKES IN NEW ZEALAND.

THE DISTRESS IN NEWFOUNDLAND

AGRARIAN MURDER IN IRELAND

! ALLEGED OUTRAGE UPON 'CHILDREN.

LORD WINDSOR'S ESTATE.

PONTYPRIDD BOARD OF GUARDIANS.

THE VACANCY IN THE CARDIFF,…