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GARDENING NOTES.

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GARDENING NOTES. [BY MB. J. MUIR, MARGAM.] MR. MARTIN ROPE SUTTON.—The 28th volume of the Garden, which was completed on December 26, has been dedicated to this gentleman, who is the head of one of the leading houses connected with horticulture in Europe. Judging by the well-known name, it will hardly be necessary to tell any of your readers that this establishment is situated at Reading, and the excellent portrait which prefaces the volume is remarkable for its faithfulness. Each volume of the Garden has been dedicated to some man of marked distinction in connection with horticulture, and the universal impression can only be that, of all the gentlemen who have had this distinction conferred upon them, none merit it more than Mr. Martin Hope Sutton, of Reading. JANUARY APPLES.—Two good varieties for cook- ing and two good ones for dessert are all that will be dealt with for this month, and these are—cook- ing, Reinette du Canada, large sized, conical, greenish yellow, tinged with brown on sunny side, flesh white, firm, and juicy, a very free bearer; Tower of Glamis, large deep yellow, brisk and juicy, a free grower and abundant bearer. Dessert, Pearson's Plate, small sized, roundish, and flattened at the crown, skin yellow, streaked with red, flesh firm and crisp, strong grower, prolific, Golden Reinette, middle-sized, roundish, golden yellow, russety, very rich flavour, excellent bearer. JANUARY PFARS.-The numbers now ripening are decreasing, and very large pears are scarce. but the quality this month is as good as ever. Knight's Monarch, middle-sized, roundish, greenish yellow, russety, melting, buttery, and rich, a good bearer, excellent. Winter Trellis, a little over middle sized, dull green, dotted with brown, highly flavoured, a good bearer. Selection and not collection should always be the main aim of pear planters, and although we could add to these, small growers will find two good varieties more satisfactory than a great number of sorts of doubtful bearing habit and questionable,in flavour. VEGETABLES IN 1886.-Now seed lists are now being issued, and varieties of vegetables increase so rapidly that those who have had no opportunity of testing many sorts may easily find themselves devoting their attention to inferior kinds while the really good ones, although perhaps not quite new. are omitted because they are not conspicuously advertised. From the many hundreds of kinds of vegetables we have tried the following are selected for their profitable bearing and excellent qualities, and they are in every way adapted for successful culture in small gardens --Beans: Broad and Seville Long-pod. Runner: Girtford Giant. Dwarf: Canadian Wonder. Broccoli: Veitch's Self-protecting Autumn, Winter White, Leaming- ton, andSutton's Late Queen. Beetroot: Dell's Crim- son, and turnip-rooted for shallow soils. Brussels sprouts: Reading Exhibition. Cabbage: Webb's Emperor, Sutton's All Heart, and Carter's Minia- ture Drumhead. Carrots: Stump-rooted and James's Intermediate. Cauliflower: Extra Early Forcing, Webb's Mammoth, and Veitch's Autumn Giant. Celery: Major Clarke's Solid Red. Cucumbers: Cardiff Castle for fmme and house culture, and King of the Ridge for open air. Leek: The Masselburgh. Lettuce: All the Year Round, Kingsholm, and Moor Park. Onions: Webb's Im- proved, Banbury, James's Keeping, and Giant Rocca. Parsley Myatt's Garnishing. Parsnips The Student. Peas: Ringleader, Champion of England, Telegraph, and Omega. Radishes French Breakfast and China Rose. Rhubarb: Royal Albert. Savoys: Green Curled. Tomatoes: Chifl- wick Red. Turnips Snowball and Orange Jelly. Potatoes Improved Ashleaf, Covent Garden Per- fection, Reading Hero, Snowdrop, Schoolmaster, Vegetable Marrow, and^Pen-y-byd. EARLY SPRING SOWN ONI0Ns.-At many of the summer shows prizes are offered for the finest specimen of spring onions, and the main desire of those who exhibit is to have them as large as possible, and one of the surest ways of accom- plishing this is to sow early. It is too soon as yet to sow in the open air, but they may be sown under the protection of a frame or hand light, Hot-beds are dangerous, as they force on the plants too much, but the seed may be sown in the ground and the frame or hand-light put over it, or a shallow box may be filled with good soil and sow in this. A box two or three feet square will pro- duce upwards of 200 plants, and this would make a nice early batch. The seed should not be put in too thick, and it should not be covered over more than half an inch. If sown at once it will not germinate for three weeks or so, and the plants will not grow very rapidly at first but by the middle or end of March they will be some inches in height, ready for transplanting, and far in advance of any which can be raised in the open air. Where frames or hand-lights are not obtainable, the seed may be sown in a few flower pots, and placed in the window. Young onions may not be very ornamental in such a position, but if these who own them win a prize with them before the season is over it is very probable that they may be heard boasting that they were "raised in the window." SHED POTATOES.—Early varieties which have been stored since August will now show indications of growing, but the growth are too early for planting, as if left on till then they would be many inches in length, and altogether too long to plant out successfuily. The better way is to turn the whole of them over now, and in doing so break off the most forward of the young shoots, then spread them out thinly in the light in a cool place, 1Wd the most backward shoots now will be robust,sturdy growths by planting time. It is very advantageous to deal with seeds of this kind. GOOSEBERRIES FOR PROFIT.—A contemporary observes:—" Those who wish to grow gooseberries for market will probably not find it advantageous to purchase the very large Lancashire kinds, first, because the trees are more costly than established sorts that are grown and sold by the thousand by nurserymen; and secondly, because they do not always bear freely. For gathering green we doubt if there are any to surpass Whitesmith and Lanca- shire Lad, the latter a red variety, and good also for preserving. Crown Bob bears heavy crops of tine fruit, but in all soils the trees do not grow freely. Early Sulphur is one of the best for afford- ing ripe fruit as soon as possible while for late use and general preserving purposes the Red Warrington has few, if any, superiors. If any of our readers can name more profitable sorts to grow by the hundred or thousand than those we have recommended, we wiJlreadily "publish the names, with any particulars of the varieties that are fur- nished." CHUYSANTHEMUJIS.—An American writer wishes that the name chrysanthemum could be shortened, as it causes some trouble to those who are not familiar with botanical names. Wo beilr them called cassanthiums, chrysantheums, as well as chrysantumbums, chrysants, and chryschian- thems." To these might be added a daring abbre- viation in common use amongst English growers —namely, the mums." CORDYMNE INDIVISA is an old greenhouse favourite of very easy culture, so that everybody having such a house should grow one or two plants of it. That this is not done is probably owing to the fact of its only being seen at flower shows under the guise of large specimens requiring more space than could be spared in the conservatories of small gardens. It is readily obtained from seed, the seedlings becoming large enough for decorative purposes in a year. We have not a more elegant plant for he dinner table, and, with due attention to watering and sponging, small plants continue in good condition for a long time. A USEFUL MANURE.—A correspondent of the Journal of Horticulture says:—I wish to bring before the notice of your readers a valuable manure too often neglected-viz., night soil. When properly prepared I know no manure to excel it in effectiveness, not even excepting the famous guano. It is more regular in its action than the former, and there is no risk in the use of it, like guano when used as a liquid manure. For cox- combs, gloxinias, celosias, and Chinese primulas it is excellent, and the latter seem to be especially at home in whatever soil the manure is mixed with. They can be grown easily to 18in. to 20in. span of foliage, producing large blooms superb in colour. I find it best to use very little leaf mould with this manure for primulas, as they have a tendency to produce too much foliage. We grow all our zonal pelargoniums in 4in. pots only, and with this manure they do extra well. On such kinds as the Rev. A. Atkinson, Masterpiece, &c., I have had at one time six fully-expanded trusses of bloom measuring from 15in. to 19in. in circumference, and that continuously through the season. One plant of Munroe's Little Heath melon grown in a box containing one pailful of turfy loam and one of this manure produced four fruits 14lbs. in weight; and one plant of Daniel's Duke of Edinburgh cucumber produced seven fruits from 24in. in length and Sin. in circum- ference to 273in. long and 9in. in circumference. 2 and straight as a ruler, with splendid bloom, and all the former receiving pure water only. In pre- paring the material to mix with tho night soil proceed as follows:—Procure some clay soil as heavy as possible, and let it dry, then get as many branches, old pea stakes, or any refuse of that kind, and make a good ring of them to begin with; then put on a layer of earth and sticks alternately, keeping the whole well together, leaving only a small aperture at the top to allow the smoke to escape and prevent it from blazing. If some bog earth be added it will be a benefit to the mixture, and when burnt out it may be watered and mixed. It is then ready for use in the closet, to which it is conveyed by a tin pipe with two stops in it similar to that in a powder flask, for regulating the supply. The calcined earth and charcoal prevents the various gases from being dissipated in the atmosphere; the rough portion falling to the sides secures the phosphoric acid, potash, &;c" contained in the usine. Or if having a quantity of night soil on hand, mix it with half the bulk of the earth, and leave it in some dry airy place for eight weeks or so. It will be found in a condition lor mixing in any compost, being minutely sub-divided by the action of the earth and perfectly modorous. I do not advance this as anything new, but as a simple means of securing all the good contained in so valuable a manure.

THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS.

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