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rUE CONTEST AT OLDHAM.

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rUE CONTEST AT OLDHAM. MR. J. M. MACLEAN'S ELECTION ADDRESS. :.Ir, J. M. Maclean, of Chiswick, part proprietor 41111 special London correspondent of the Western has issued his address as Conservative can- Idltte for the borough of Oldham. Mr. Maclean i,R formerly editor and proprietor of the Bombay ?i:nte. On nis return to England he accepted an ^itation to contest the Elgin Boroughs in tha onservative interest against, Mr. Grant Duff, and hougi) defeated, as, under the circumstances, v/as jJJlly expected, his conduct was so appreciated, by q heads of the party that he was elocted member of the Carlton Club, and, has s!Qce, on several successive occasions,, been pected a member of the Council of the .Antral Union of Conservative Associations, an pQour very highly esteemed, and to which the flowing local gentlemen were admitted at the v^ent meeting of the association at Newport:— J. 8. Hopkins, Lord Emlyn, M.P., Mr. A. E. b?uthall. the Hon. Col, Morgan, M..P., and Mr. 0%vel Gwvn. In his address Mr. M.nclean asks :— Will the constituencies reverse on appeal the r'Herice of condemnation pronounced upon the Government by Mr. Gladstone's own House of VOQUEons, chosen in 1880 to exf/cute his will, but b;1ven to abandon him by the series of disastrous Anders which marked the whole course of his ^ministration, and filled every patriotic heart 't'l shame? Short indeed must be the memory. d boundless the credulity, of a nation that could Fve a fresh lease of power to the man who months ago fle-J from office, leaving gland enfeebled i j her resources, crippled her strength, sliorn of her prestige, the 1.1 OCkery of her nvajs, the scorn of her enemies, l)eqU;Ll even to thr) defence of the Indian frontier °hr Empire whon threatened by foreign aggres- J*11- I am pror.d to belong to the Torty party cause I recog'.iise in Lord Salisbury a Minister le and willing to uphold a strong national and Perial policy in foreign affairs. The spirit of erPiise w/hich created our Empire and made his groat, and which Mr. Gladstone has done •noASt 'fePress and extinguish, will receive due the Ura £ r-'Tnent at the hands of his successor, and rfc PreS(«it Government will not shrink from the ^.P^S'ibility of both keeping a firm hold on the JVJ. nS possessions of the Crown and opening, if Pra £ >tic«ble, new markets for the benefit [i '■Jiglish industry and commerce. The effects of prolonged depression in trade have been o^here more severely felt than in Oldham, 1 am. convinced that the wage-earn- class indignantly resent the rude re- tsal of the Oldliam Chamber of Commerce to help tj e Royal Commission appointed by the Conserva- tlT6 ^overnment in its inquiry into the causes of depression of trade and the means wherebv it Q ay be remedied. Not satisfied with the harm to our commerce by an impotent foreign the Radicals have now put forward a pPo- 3 at&me of home policy based on the immoral J^trine that the poor, having acquired power, f,0l>ld use it witiiout scruple to plunder the rich, k 6 wild projects of change urged by Mr. Cham- £ t ain tend to set class against class, to unsettle '^it, to impoverish agriculture by frightening k Pital from investment in landed property, and, bp drying up the sources of national pros- to make the prospects of trade worse 's tk better. Believing, as I do, that the State v he worst of all possible landlords, I am strongly titPOsed to any scheme for enabling local autho- ^>l<v *° Purc^ase land for division into small IJ^ngs. Everyone regrets the extinction of the yeomanry, but the consolidation of small «into larger ones is an economical process if jfch has been going on for centuries in spite requent laws passed to restrain it. I incline ^nally to the opinion that the best chance of Rasing the number of persons directly inte- in the land lies in the application to agri- Vk- re of that principle of voluntary co-operation has achieved so much success in other jiU^strial enterprises. But, in order to give free 10 systems of agriculture, I would gladly for suah changes in the land laws as are re- to make the transfer of land cheap and •d Witli regard to the proposal that education ^6 l^^tary schools should be wholly paid for by ^j5tp»te, 1 readily grant that there is much to be V? its favour, if it can be carried into effect Ut PrejU(3ice to Voluntary Schools. But it is that the object of Mr. Chamberlain and his _nd8 is to break down the denominational Mu an^ 60 substitute secular fol- religious Option. These men are really wftging war lo lQst liberty of conscience. What we have tt dread in these days is the intolerance W secularism, which, if not strenuously 0{^ted, will destroy the religious character t»f ^Ur Voluntary Schools. It is the peculiar glory I¡tio tlglish civilisation that in this country re- has kept itself closely allied with the pro- inte^'gence °f the age. The divorce Christianity and the • modern spirit,' is working so much social mischief else- has not yet been accomplished in England, ^ill it be so long as the English people eliag to too^ftogious training of their children as a priceless Hussion. If returned to Parliament, 1 shall Vfastly oppose the Disestablishment or Dis- j w«*ent ef the Established Churches of Eug-' land and Scotland. I am in favour of extending the powers and simplifying the administration of Local Government. But I hold that the object of legislation should be to jealously guard individual liberty, except where it plainly conflicts with the welfare of the State. I look, therefore, with sus- picion on schemes which, under the specious disguise of conceding Local Option, would limit the freedom of capable citizens. The moderate use of stimulants is wholesome and beneficial, and I could not vote for giving a majority of the population in any locality authority to prohibit the sale of alcoholic liquors, and so to deprive the minority of the right to drink whatever beverage they like. The Irish question remains now as it was at the last General er' Election, the chief difficulty that English politi- cians have to face. That the union between Great Britain and Ireland must be maintained is the un- animous opinion of the English people. Nor can I bring myself to believe that a majority of the Irish people are really of the other way of thinking. To reconcile Irish patriotism with attachment to the English connection, and to place the union of the two countries on an imperishable basis of material interest and mutual goodwill, should be the constant aim of English statesmen."

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