Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

36 articles on this Page

THE MAHDI SUING FOR PEACE.

WITH GENERAL EARLE'S COLUMN.

DIFFICULTY OF COMMUNICATING…

EFFECl OF LORD WOLSELEY'S…

EXPECTED RETREAT OF OSMAN…

ENGLAND, TURKEY, AND EGYPT.

EGYPTIAN FINANCE.

ACTIVE OPERATIONS IMMINENT.

RUMOURED DECLARATION OF WAR.

DEBATE-IN THE. FRENCH CHAMBER.

THE EARTHQUAKE IN SPAIN. |

THE FENIAN OUTRAGE IN NEW…

FURTHER FRENCH TROUBLES IN…

MR. VANDERBILT AND GENERAL…

GERMAN COLONISATION IN WEST…

PROPOSED BRITISH ANNEXATION…

THE ABYSSINIAN MISSION.

DECORATIONS FOR PRINCE EDWARD…

DEATH OF AN EX-AMERICAN VICE-PRESIDENT.

FRANCE AND GERMANY.

SOCIALIST MURDER IN GERMANY.

GERMAN CORN DUTIES.

--AUSTRALIA AND THE GERMAN…

THE DIVISIONS OF CARMARTHENSHIRE.

THE PROPOSED LOCAL LABOUR…

POPULATION AND REPRESENTATION.

F, ENGLAND AND HER COLONIES.…

Advertising

SUGGESTED CANDIDATES FOR WELSH…

News
Cite
Share

SUGGESTED CANDIDATES FOR WELSH PARLIAMENTARY SEATS. INTERVIEW WITH DR. EDWARDS OF CARDIFF. [BY OUR SPECIAL COMMISSIONER.] Newspapers, those "brief and abstract chroniclers of the time," do not profess to be infallible. I know the expression, It must be true, because it was in the papers," has come to be quite a stereo- typed one; but I also know that newspaper editors, sub-editors, and reporters are sometimes respon- sible for statements which, not to put too fine a point" on them, are misleading. This is not wilful: I speak generally. It is the natural result of a consuming anxiety to keep the omni- verous reading constituency of journalistic enter- prise au courant with every event of interest and importance which presents itself in the world's ever-revolving kaleidoscope. There are, however, I regret to confess, exceptions to the rule. There is a tag-rag-and-bobtail" newspaperdom extant where statements are published which are known so be unauthenticated, or, at least, where no trouble is taken to test their genuineness. The other day one of your local contemporaries per- mitted its columns to be used for the purpose of announcing Dr. Edwards, of Cardiff, as a candidate for the representation of the Caerphilly, or East Glamorgan, District in the re- division of Glamorganshire. The statement was repeated over and over again, although the con- ductors of the journal in question must have known that the doctor's name was being used without his knowledge or consent. When I first saw the announcement I was incredulous. I knew Dr. Edwards to be an ardent politician, but I knew, too, that he had a large practice in Cardiff, and that his duties in regard to that were sitting sufficiently heavily upon him to render any increased work undesirable. I thought, however, I should like to satisfy myself, so yester- day morning I called upon him at his residence in Crockherbtown, in order to hear from his own lips what were his exact intentions as to seeking Parliamentary honours and his sentiments with regard to the division with which his name had been associated. The doctor lives in what I may call a double- brepsted red-brick mansion of modern build. It is situated in Crockherbtown, just before you come to those terrible eye-sores, the railway bridges, which span the thoroughfare in that neighbourhood. It is a plain, substantial building, and is surrounded by grounds containing an abundance of greenery. The only objection I should take to it, if I lived there, is the noise of the street traffic, which is rather pronounced. Dr. Edwards is, I need scarcely remind his fellow- citizens, a prominent figure in the social and domestic economy of Cardiff. He does not take, has never taken, as far as I am aware, an active part in the municipal life uf the town. He has, when Parliamentary elections come round, been very busy in forwarding the interests of the Liberal candidates for the representation of the borough. He has canvassed for them, and has used his oratorical powers on their behalf with singular success. He is a good platform speaker, and has the happy tact of so framing his speeches as to make them most acceptable to the party he serves without being offensive to the other side. He has a wide reputation as a medical man, and there is scarcely an intricate case to be dealt with in the whole district in which his skill and expe- rience are not in demand when a consultation" is necessary. He has laboured hard in connection with the Cardiff Infirmary, and at the present moment is one of the honorary physicians of that admirable institution. When I entered Dr. Edwards's breakfast-room yesterday I had, though a comparative stranger, a cordial reception. The apartment was plainly but solidly furnished. There were numerous pictures cn the walls, and the light streaming in at the ample bay windows lit up picturesquely a group of shrubs and plants which were tastefully dis- posed in the aperture. Among the pictures was an admirable life-sized head and bust, from the stone, of the late Mr. John Batchelor, taken in his prime. It is a speaking likeness, and as I know the diffi- culty experienced in obtaining a carte of the deceased gentleman when it was first proposed to erect. a statue to his memory I could not help thinking that it would bo a useful aid to Mr. Milo Griffith when he sats about the accomplishment of the work with which he has been entrusted. So much for the man, his abode, and his penates. I opened the conversation by remarking that I dare say Dr. Edwards would be surprised at my visit, but that I was desirous of assuring myself upon a subject which had been in men's minds and mouths for some time past. Your name," I continued, has been put forth in a local paper as one of the Radical candidates for the proposed Caerphilly Division; have you any intention of allowing yourself to be put in nomination'?'' "Not the slightest, believe me," replied the Doctor; no one has been more surprised than myself at the use which has been made of my name in this business. I was, as you may be aware, appointed one of the committee to consider the question of the boundaries, and attended one of the meetings, but was called away by pro- fessional duties. As a Liberal, I am inclined to think that the division proposed by the Boundary Commissioners is a fair one. I, however, feel strongly the unfairness of granting to Swansea two members whilst the continually growing town of Cardiff is left with only one. Of course, my opinion is not worth much, but I feel strongly on that point." What do you say to the Caerphilly Division ? I ask the question because I am not unaware that you are a Caerphilly man born and bred." Well, to tell you the truth, I have not studied the proposal sufficiently to offer an opinion. From what I have seen and heard, I do not think there is any particular objection to be made to the pro- posal, I should like to see the county fairly repre- sented, but I do not believe in any partition of the agricultural and commercial classes." "Supposing a deputation were to wait upon you for the purpose of inviting you to become a candi- date for the Caerphilly Division, would that alter your present sentiments in any way ?" Not at all. I have no time, nor have I the inclination at my time of life to undertake the responsibilities of Parliamentary life. When I saw my name in the paper I personally communi- cated with one of the proprietors, and begged him not to allow any further communications of the kind to appear. At my age I should decidedly object to be taxed in the way a man would have to be if he entered Parliamentary life and had to answer all the calls ot the Whips. "But, doctor, you have much of your rest broken by the demands of your patients, have yeu not ? Well, of course, that is the case; but, then, that is my profession. However, if I were requested by the entire constituency to become their member I should courteously but firmly decline the honour. What you say about my rest being broken is true. I was called up after going to bed last night to go to a consultation. You may not know, sir, that I am getting rather aged in harness. I have practised in Cardiff for 40 years this very week." That is a long time, doctor; let me pay you the compliment of saying I have always heard your name mentioned as the head of the medical profession in the town. After all, there was some probability in the statement that you, as a Caer- philly man, would have been a suitable represen- tative for the division which it is proposed to name after the old town. By the bye, what do you think about the name to be given to this division jI" I do not think it matters much by what name it is called. To be sure, Caerphilly is a very ancient town, and ought to be considered on that account. It is a mere matter of opinion. My great-grandfather was a well-known Caerphilly man. You see that small steel engraving in the corner there ? (I assented.) That is his likeness. He built that famous bridge over the Taff at Pontypridd, which for many years after its erection was the longest spanned arch in the world. He built three bridges there, one a three- arch one, which was swept away by the bore,' which, before the erection of weirs, &c., used to roll down the Taff from the Brecon Beacons in almost as large proportions as the bore' on the Severn of to-day. He also built bridges at Usk, Pontardawe, Bettws, Llandovery, Aberavon, and many other places in South Wales." The doctor then offered for my examination an old plate of the well-known bridge, which was completed in 1755, and read for my information a number of extralÙ" of an interesting character in reference to this bridge in particular, and the other works of a man who, as far as I can learn, was a self-taught architect, and became famous in his day and generation as "the self-taught bridge maker." We renewed our conversation in reference to the object of my visit, but the doctor became reticent, pleading that he was certain of only one thing, and that was that he should not BE a candidate for the Caerphilly Division or any other division, and that he did not know enough of the proposed divi- sion of the county to offer any opinion as to its fitness or equity. The ringing of the door bell reminded me that the time of medical gentlemen is valuable, and, shaking hands with my short-time host, I said the usual and inevitable" Good day," and took my depar- ture.

A CAMBRIAN SOCIETY FOR SOUTH…

CORRESPONDENCE.

[No title]

DEATH OF THE EAKL OF !* A…

BRITISH FEEti TRADE TlON.…

KENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW, LOJNDO^'f…

Advertising