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THE ASTRAL LIGHT. .

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THE ASTRAL LIGHT. Almost all persons, and particularly thoee tr nervous temperament, have it in their power to devop the strange w-rt of consoiou.s- ness known to students of the occult as "see- ing in the astral light." You place upon a, white wall a black or blue disc, an inch m diameter, with nothing near it to distract the attention, and then, sitting comforta-bly before it, look steadily at that ot. Try to not think about anything, do not even stir the mind to the slight effort of wifcing Yor results, but just look intently at the spot for half a.n hour. Out of the mist some picture will appear —a hand, a face, a whole figure, an animal, a ian<i>acape. After a time you will see caeariy men and women, and even worse things, which may not be subjective. Penelope^ M^nall wag a very estiniabte spinster, who, having reluctantly abandoned hopes of matrimony turned lIriittlltion to other and more attainable mysteries, among which, "seeang in the atrtral light" soon became a. prime favorite. She had reached the point at winch the filn women she saw in her visions were quite distinct as iuny real a.nd tangible persons whom she might have jostled in the street, and. they interested her deeply—particularly the men, just a.s a child looking through a window might be fascinated by persons pas.s-inar before it, Her brother, fomiliariy known in the family as Uncte John, with whom she lived, ratner suspected her of being a. ¡itt crazv when she told mm of her new f'aeuitv. He was hearty, burly "man about town, very nmfcervalistac and practioal, and although he himself aometinws mv thing that were not—as. for instance, two cabs where there was really only one—-such visions rarely oc- eared to him early in the eveming and never owing the diav. After supper one eveing Pen.e, accord- ing to custom, went to sit before her mental window in her own boudoin. and had hard'v more than i-ettled hersetf in front of the spot ou too wal when a figure of a man appeared to her, lie earned to come through the portieres of her bedroom door, bat of course knew that wa, an illusion. Although fK>t a pleaaing looking person, as a he interested her. Being much «.,k>ne, having nc 'I one else to converse with, ?he had formed a habit of uttering her thought* aloud, talking to «rsell, and ro. at seeing hi.-Ti, she ex- ■aimed: "A How nice' And how plainly 1. gee him r' The man gave a gasp 01 astonishment and .u)()({ stanng at her silently. She rambled, 00 m her art leas way, "Wbat a bad face he has-a. vilg&r, mean face I The man scowled. "Deer me, how strange tie actually eeemea oonscaouis of my impression oonceraing bInt and appeared to resent it. I should be *fra-d to meet him in the dark, if I did not know he wag nothing but a phantom, an jjiy nothing, a fiction of the imagination. at most a mere shade. The man appeared' to pmch himself to see (how fflf tha-t ws so. His nose « r-d, as if he dranK a great awaj, and ne has a very brutal mouth." Yonve got a deal of mouth your- it strikes me," retorted the man va. how delightful! And how strange! 1 was conscious of the creature's thought seemed j'ust 33 if he had reaLy spoken •iw. rtnat proves lt must objective, lneu I am really seeing a spirit? What a bad ram he must have been when alive 1 lie looks it even yet." what are you givin' me? What's yer game? People blows themselves up with such funny business as you're plavin Oh Again I understood him And vet he must belong to tht- lowest class hcp'div more than a rudimental soul, I should say How bad he mut have bean when alive!" xes, Im a ba-a-ad man. I am, But I mt no dead bad man vet, old girl; you caD bet your false teeth on that i" "How offensively personal he is 'So more than you are yountvi". You begun it. "Dear me! l don't hke him at all. I man 1» knew how to dismiss him, but I don't. 811 the worst of these eaith-bound spmts Thoy come uuinvked, a.nd not go until they are ready." on your life, not till I get ready, whether I m earth-bound or brass-bound As ne spoKe he moved to one side and tftarted to go behind the armchair in which phe sat. Penelope, with undiminished cniro, since she felt no apprehension of injury hum a mere phantom, as she was quite convinced he waa, turned her eyes towards a pier-glass in which she could continue to watch his movements, and murmured: "I wonder what he going to do?" Sht" did not have to wonder long. With the quickness of a cat pouncing upon a bird, he sprang to he. aud spread a big, unclean hand over her mouth, with the thumb and forefinger grasping her nose so tightly that she could not cry out or even breathe. "Make a sound and I break ver face See? I'm out for the stuff. Give it up. and I treats you like a gentleman. If vou I sJIl¡j.llh you and take it anyway. See "I don't think you will," vsaid a firm voice, aooompacued by an ominous little double click, and turning (jiiickiy the surprised robber sa>v behind him Uncle John with a cocked revoiver aimed at hiu head. Mr Me rail was passing through the hall on hi s way going out. he he-.ird Mie fellow's voice in hit sister s room. and noiselessly entered, juist m the nick of time. v "Say let up I weaken You've got the drop on me I" protected the thief in dano. relinquishing Penelope' noss and endeavouring tu shield himse'f behind her. "Put up yon: Stands and back, into that oonusr behind you commanded Uncle ,101m, and the fellow obeyed, pleading: "I mean it. sir. T wouldn't have hu-t the ladv. I -.r&$',?& giving a bluff, Penelope, finding her nose free once note, took in the .'ongest breath she had ever drawn, and promptly let It out, again in a proportionated prodigious scream. The cii.ptiv- tillef was soon taken away bv policeman. after jonfess-ng that he iiad entered the house by flimbing in at a window while the family it tea, so that Pene- lope was no permitted to cherish the illusion alrea'!v litilf formed in her ound that the "ba-aaf, man" was a materialised being the s.»trai plane. From that time on, in self-defence against Uncle ,John jokes, she ceased trving to oi the astral light." v J. H. CON N ELLY.

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