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NEW LICENSES. BRYNMILL. Mr. Lloyd Morgan appeared ,jU behalf of Mr. DAVID Jarvis. High-street, to apply far a provisional license under the &2Hd SEETIOIV-OF the 1874 Licensing ACT. The APPLICANT' said i'r. Morgan WAS MR. Jarvis, and the house for which, trie license was applied was situated at the corner of Brynuiill-a* eovte and Marl borough-road, at Brytimil', in the WESTERN I part of the borough. Atthispomt PLANS ef the district were put into court. It was stated that- there • "» >F applicntioirj for licenses in Mr. Howells: That IS so. ■ for MR. D. V, JONES. WL-. • .O not I' TIIKE ail the applications at 1 -ilia tiitfe. T'le Beach conferred upon the matter, and the Head-eonsiabie. in reply to a query, said with a smile, "on, I oppose them a'i." ) Mr. Watkins: I object to all the applica- ¡ tions being heard at once, There are three licences applied for, one for BE-er AUD two ¡ fuil licences. It was ultimately agreed that all the appli- cations should be heard before any DEEAEON- was arrived at, cations should be heard before any dectiRon- wasarrtTedat. Mr. Lloyd Morgan, can tinning, stated THAT J a similar application had bean made twelve- months 'WO. but that circumstance HAD i greatly changed since that Üme. A year AGO simply the plans of the prospective licensed house were submitted, while cow tbe house I, was partially erected. The district VWS he- coming very thickly popuiavod. NolegsthanjUft NEW houses had become inhabited during tbe past twelve months, SPEAKING cf- TIN applicant, Mr. MORGAN urged that Mr. JARRIS was a mar. lit to receive a Uuense. HO WUF, and had been for the past 18 years, alicenseu i vtctnaller in Swansea, having kept the S *AN I nn iu High street; arulduring TFCFJ WHOIE of T at fcirae thera HAD never been A single, COAT^ aint against him. Proeeediug, the EPE&kor E-itered M SOME detail into a description OF t >•" house, for whieh the licence was wanted, details that were RUDJSEQTFC-ATLY borne out by the first WLIO appeared in support of th rion* in conclusion, llcstIJd the NE% = toi the proposed hotel was ?boafc K « -vrtlft j away, the Cricketers Arms, at V -T ql j THE bill. IIIE cejU. WAS THE HK WS1 about 1,300 yeards away, and this he sabmH-iied WAS too wide an area to be wiioout a licensed BLOUSE. The licence for the Cricketers had been gsanted as far back as fourteen years ago, and since then building had been going ona&eadily, an<l he district bad been greatly ENLARGED. Mr. JBtannaford, the architect of the new >HOTEIJ^AVE evidence to the effect that the building would probably be com- pleted in about three months. The r eon tract would cost probably £2,000. Thehotel would consist of eleven bedrooms, bitl-mrd-and coffee rooms, and all the usual •offices. There were 408 "houses in that district, whieh were nearer the proposed hotel than any other The cross-examination of Mr. Leyson' 'elicited the fact that Jthe contract stipulated -that the building should be completed by the 15th July, 1884, under a penalty of £ 2 aJ Wteek. Cross-eraminedby Mr. Richard, Watkins, "bethought there would be a gradient-of 1 INJ 11 leading to the hotel. Mr. Watkins was proceeding, to examine the witness on the width-of the roads in that district, when The Mayor: What is your object in asking 'these particulars about the roads ? What has ■ikgot to do with the granting of the licence ? Surely it is wasting time Mr. H atkins ejqpiained that be wanted to •show the constraetion of the neighbourhood' (and the class of people living there. Councillor Millward, living about 3eO yards .from the proposed hotel, gave evidence. He certainly thought a licensed house was required at the spot, named. The .Cricketers' Arms was the nearest licensed house, asd was frequently inconveniently crowded, especially during the football season. In answer to the Chief-constable, he said ■ithat the proposed hotel was in a most suit- able position. The witness was cress-examined for a few minutes by Mr. Leyson about his connection with the district. Mr. Leyson You only got in the council by a bye-election without opposition.—Witness (hotly): That has'nothing to do with the case. Don't you be annoyed because I am come here to give evidence. JSo, I am not annoyed with you. I am never annoyed. (Laughter.) You dontj suggest you know more about this locality as regards the question of beer-drin log:—Iam| not going to do s Then your little pose about the County Council h id nothing to do with it ?—If I said I was not a member I ahouid nob be telling the truth. Anyhow, you have not lived long in the district ?—No. but I know a good deal about the locality. About twansea generally, but not that locality ?—Yes, I do. You are engaged in business all day, and not in that loeality, and you know as much about it as other fellows do. (Laughter.) Is it not an out-of-the-way nlaee ?—Not at alL Mr. Richard Watkins You are a licensed victualler in this town Mr. Mdward ?—Yes, I am not ashamed of it. Mr. VYatkins 1 did not say you were. Mr. James, of Rhydu.ngs Park-road, said that he had lived in the neighbourhood two years. During that time the district had grown very fast, and five or six ooutractors were continually at work there. He did not think that tile Cricketers' Arins was sufficient to supply the whole neighbourhood. Witness, continuing, pooh-poohid the idea that the incline would in any way prevent vehicles going by. By Mr, Leyson: Witness had been can- vassing the district and knew that many people wanted it. Mr. Leyson: Oh, such is your anxiety, eh! You used to be a licensed victualler, didn't you f- I did, and would like to get hold of this licence. By Mr Thom&s Freeman: Witness could give instances of dozens of people in Bryn. mili who were continually suffering incon- venience because they could not get beer with- out going down to the Cricketers'. David JaniF, the applicant, was then put into the box. He bore out the statement respecting him made by his advocate. By Mr. Leyson Witness was peing to io sell the Swan Inn, at which he had been for the last nineteen years, and move to Brynmili if he eould get the licence. Mr Thomas Freeman What do ycu mean to do if you can t get a licence ? Turn the place inta a dwelling-house. Mr. Juo. Fe-lowcs, who also gave evidenc3, was very closely examined by Mr. 11. T. leyson, who was in a specially iovial frame df. mind. The following dialogue took ]ftace — Mr. Leyson De you cansider it advisable that a new licence be granted in your district ?--I consider it of the utmost importance. (Loud laughter.) Manv tee- totalers of the district are strongly in favour of it. Why are yon so anxious ?—Personally I'm not anxions. What are you?—What am I? I am an accountant's clerk. J-i there a little financial arrangement behind all this ?—Not one. Why so anxious in getting up this petition, then ?—I would be always glad to be able to .help my N$ghbours and do them a good turn .if I was in your position. (Loud laughter.) H'm, pure philanthropy well, that'll do. Mr. Lioyd Morgan now produced a peti- tion which he wished to put into court. Mr. Fowler You cannot put it in as evidence. You may not do more than put it j upon the table. Mr. Leyson ■ Oh, that'll do very nicely, sir; no one will look at it. (Laughter.) Mr Leyson (pointing to sketch of the hotel): Is this for the place for all those who can't get lodgings ? -Oh, no. They could net all BE accommodated there. Is it for the carts. Horses, and caravans, including their washing ? (Laughter.)—-I daresay they vroula have no objection to have your horse there at any time. (Laughter.) No, I would not care to trust it therr. (Loud laughter.) It would be a very nice pirwe, and on your v a.y home. sir. • Loud laughter in court.) This closed the. applicant's case. (Proceeding,)

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