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SARASATE ON THE VIOLIN.

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SARASATE ON THE VIOLIN. The great Spanish violinist has been talking about himself to a Writer in the "Musical News," who was anxious to know what" hygienic measures" Ser.or Sarasate took to husband his strength. Witb such matters he netver concerned himself, was the reply. 1-1 drink beer like a German, smoke cigarettes like a Spaniard, and find myself nono the worse. I am nearly fifty years of age, yet never felt my hand steadier on the finger-board than now. Of course I get very tired sometimes I am tired not; for instance, having played at tiro corcerts this week, but a little rest soon put» mo right again. Fortunately I ean gleep when travelling at night, and it is sleep which mini- mises the fatigue more than anythuig. I practice very little, except when studying new pieces. It 1. c ;riou8 how in that respect artists differ. Take pianists, for instance, Saint-Saens, who played his own concerto at the Philharmonic on the occasion of hill last visit here, had not practised for twelve months, having been too much absorbed in com. tiohition; yet how magnifientlcy he played, with what dignity, ease, and unerring technique. M. Paderewski studies for seven or eight hours daily, so as to keep his fingers lissome. There Bis the secret. I believe my hand is lissome because the bones are sninll, and rehearsals and concerts are almost enough practice for me. Now, large finger joints must require more movement to keep them flexible. As I said before. I nsver felt my hand more certain than now. Formerly I had always an hour's practice before playing in public, but now I do not even need that." Answering the question cs to his ideal violinist, Sarasate aaid" Without hes.i.Lion I reply Henri W ieuiawski. Ho waf equally perfect in all the styles, in classical romantic, or virtuoso music. I run proud to be- loig to his f:4iool of playing, the Latin schr)()1 the school 'sliich insists above all on the vioiin. Heing r.vado to sing. W< play without undue pres- sure of the bow on the string, with the violi" held in fro.r,, not hnuged by the left cheek, nor scra]>vj by the beard, with the head up and the wrist freey aiid so the tone comes freely, naturally, easily." HOW SAVAGES HUNT. In the"'pursuit of game the savage is a master of the art of deception. Deerstalking among the Dogrib Indians is managed by a skilful counterfeit of "the animal. Two hunt-era walk together, the man behind with bent body, the one in front carry- ing a stag's head. The legs of the men serve vw Y well for the fore and hind legs of the animal. b this way the hunters ge-s simost in the midst of a jiard of deer before these KJ-e aware of danger. The "ostrich is hunted in a s.imilar way by the bushmen of South Africa; and the Eskimos sometimes come to olose quarters with seals by dressing themselves in sealskins and dexterously mimicking the style of swimming and "Hopping" so characteristc of the animal. The Indians of th! Central Plains (North America) get airxmgst a herd of bison by _«:>vering their bodies with the skin of the prairie wolf: whilst, by the Hottentots, the buffalo has himself been trained to hunt, being guided by a string attached to his horn, the hunter meanwhile crouch- ing behind him. In Australia the natives bring th £ wallaby cr young kangaroo within the range of the spear by suspending a small bird's skin and feathers from the end of a. long rod and imitating the bud's cry. The artfulness of the Australian is also si-own by his methcd of taking waterfowl. The coa-st people are usually excellent swimmers, and they will got amougt't a flock of ducks by swimming long distances under water and breathing through a mcd. or they wiU merely cover the head with weed -and swim, without causing a ripple, until tney at' within r(-xn!L of the birds, which the? quietly pull iieaer one by one without giving alarm to the rest of «fie tiock. This latter is perhaps the aimplcst form duck-hunting, and seems to have been noticed in <er parts of the world.—"Chaaa* t.GTs's JaurijaJ

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THITMUKDERNEAR J-ONDON^

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ACTION AGAINST MR. GEO. NEVNES.…

PITH AND POINT.

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STRIKES AND LOCK-OUTS.

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MR. JOHN MORLEY AT NEWCASTLE.

11 MR. T. E. ELLTS INTEIIVIEWEI),…

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