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i LINER GOES DOWN.

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MR. W. DENMAN BENSON. i

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SUFFRAGETTE RIOT.

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SUFFRAGETTE RIOT. PROCESSION MARCHES ON WEST- MINSTER. POLICE CHARGE DENSE CROWDS SERIES OF E XCITlNG SCENES, SCORES OF ARRESTS: PARLIA- MENT BESIEGED. The Suffragettes raised "red rebel lion" at Westmmster on Wednesday evenmg. They Laid siege to the Houses of Parliament for almost six hoars on end—from five o'clock to eleven. There were two great phases of the battle royal with the police, in the first thirty-four of them were arrested, and in the second an additional twenty-three, iocktdiag the husband of one of the ladies. A man was also arrested in the crowd for stealing a watch. The evening's scenes began quietly with a demonstration at the Caxton Hall, West- minster. From that point, about five o'clock in the afternoon, Mis. Desparo- who has lamented often that the police will not arrest her, and whose wish is now gra- tiDed-led a procession of some 150 militant Suffragettes to St. Stephen's. Their griev- ance was that the King's speech made no reference to women's suffrage. For over an hour the vicinity of Parlia- ment, within and without, was the scene of fighting and pushing, excited flights into the lobby and prompt ejections, struggles with the police, and repeated breaking-up of the growing crowds by mounted men. While there were incidents grave and gay, there is unfortunately evidence that in one or two cases the women were treated with undoe roughness. One lady suffers in con- sequence from a serious injury. She was a Miss Varley, of Bradford, who fell at the entrance and struck her head on the stone pavement, beigg stunned for a. while. Whilst this struggle was in progress the main prooessioo, which had marched chant- ing "John Brown's Body," was passing the Abbey. There the mounted police tried to force them back, and there were exciting moments, as when a burly constable and his prisoner were rolling among the horses' feet. The police were long-suffering, but had to make arrests to clear the wa.y. Many of the women made dexterous use of their umbrellas, and police helmets were often on the ground. t Linking arms, scattered bands of Srcffra- gettes steadfastly refused to "move on." Bands of ten or a dozen, clinging together lilce burrs, held their own bra.vely, and gave the utmost trouble to the police, for they had to be torn apart into their com- ponent individuals none too gently. Hats were torn off, and hair "came down" pretty generally. Opposite the Cromwell statue the pavement must have been liter- ed with hairpintl. One by one prisoners began to stream towards Cannoo-row Police Station. Early came Mrø. Despard, sister of General French, her keen., aquiline face aglow with enthusiasm. She walked quite quietly and sedately, and her bonnet, almost deaoooees- ILke in its severity, was one of the few that had not left its proper position. It was the most dignified arrest of all, and as she walked up the steps of the Station, a policeman on either side holding her ann, she was heartily cheered. Is all ö8 arrest* were made up to U.15, including at least two Cardiff ladies, the Misses E. and L. Gillett, whilst other well- known Suffragettes who fell into the hands of the police included Misses Christabel a.nd Sylvia Pankhurst, Miss Gawthorpe (whose exploits in Mid -Glamorgan will be fresh in the memory), Mrs. Despard, sister of General French, etc. Early in the evening 54 of the arrested women had been bailed out, and they re- turned to the Caxton Hall, where a de- monstration took place, over which Miss Christabel Pankhurst presided. Then came the most dramatic moment of the day. Miss Pankhurst rose in her seat and ex- claimed, "Let us all go a.nd the packed meeting rose as N one. "RiBe up, women!" shouted their leaders and the answer^ came back in the ringing cry, "Xow!" Outside they formed up six deep, and arm-in-arm started off again for St. Stephen's It the first time in the history of the movement that the Suffra- gettes had marched on the House twice in one day. Lustily they sang "We'll all go marching on. But the police were ready, and a dozen burly officers ran into the racks and scattered them right and left. Not to be beaten, the women struck out in a huge mob aJong Victoria-street, accom- panied by over a thousand people. The crowd grew to enormous proportions, al- though the polioe broke up the serried ranks. It was no use, however. The wo- me? r<T*c,7fc* Parliament-Square once more and a battle royal commenced. Across the Yard had been drawn a body of polIce, two deep, a sotid wall of stàrn" officialdom, that even the women could not penetrate. Mies Ellen Smith, of Norbury, essayed an impossibility. With desperate energy she flung herself on the human wall, only to be firmly pushed back. Three times she did this, and then the inevitable bap- peood-she wae arrested. Something like a riot now occurred. Large crowds had gathered, and the arrests mere made amidst a regular football scrim- mage—parties of police dashing into the throng again and again and hauling out new captures. Police reinforcements were hurried up, and finally the mob was driven out of the Square by sheer force. Amidst a series of exciting scenes the crowd was broken up bit by bit. but the excitement and confusion around the Palace Yard con- tinued up to midnight.

SUFFRAGETTE SCENES SEQUEL.

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