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ISTRIKE SETTLED.1 -

TERMS RATIFIED-

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TERMS RATIFIED- FURTHER CONCESSIONS TO THE MEN. AGREEMENT TO BE SIGNED IN A FEW DAYS. Tho conference Listed one hci.r and ten ¡. minutes, and at the conclusion Mr. Williams informed tho ''Post" representative that he had secured certain oilier concessions. The agrooment will be signed within the next few days, and will bold good for twelve months, and will then be subject to a. six month's notice on either side. The hobblers are the only section tha.t ha.ve failed to obtain any concessions. The men's representatives urged as a point that the nion should leave at five o'clock instead of 5.30 p.m., but the employ- ers pointed out that this would mean an ad- dition to tbpm of jB900 per year. The masters maintained their point that the men should leave work at the usual time, T'.ajnely, 5.30 p.m. As previously stated, Lhe men will return to work to-morrow morning. 0:%UTE SETTLED MEN RETURN TO WORK. Following on the settlement of the dis- pute at Messrs. Weaver and Co.'s flour mills, Swansea, the men returned to work as usual on Thursday morning. The agree- ment arrived at between the parties applies both to Messrs. Weaver's employes and Messrs. Thomas. Evans and Dyer. WHAT IT HAS COST THE UNION. The strike has cost the Union a little over £100. The Pert, which went. over to Messrs. W eaver's Wharf on Tuesday, is now loading wjth floor, and wiili sail for the South-West of England by Wednesday night's tide. AYIEH THE STRIKE: MENS LEADER'S ADDRESS. A further meeting of the men was held at the Bird-in-Hand Hotel on Wednesday evening, Mr. J. Miles presiding. Mr. H. W lilianis, addressing those pre- sent as "men and brothers," said he hardly knew how to express himself now the strike was over. Now that the strike was over he did not know that any great harm had been done to the mills, and he thought the feeling of brotherhood had been brought about more during the past week thaai ever before. Reference had been made to what occurred seven years ago, but let the past bury t.ho dead. There was a future before them, and be reminded them they would get little by begging; collectivism must be the keynote. To help others in a lower position wa.s the true L embodiment of the brotherhood of man, and they had helped others to secure what they received. When they required another increase it would be an advantage, because all the men were now on an equal footing. (Applause). As regards the Labourers' Union he reminded them of the part they had taken in connec- tion with the National Labour Council, and the respect in which they were held. As to the conduct of the strike under notice he wished them to understand that it was not egotistic on his part to say that possibly, with the confidence of the men, a good leader might do a great deal more than another who had not the confidence of the men. To-day he was pre- pared to tell them that a. w*vk a.go he asked them to conduct the strike in a way that would redound to the credit of the men and the Union and the officials, and they had done it manfully. None had a word to say against them, and the way they had conducted it was a credit to them. What- ever happened seven years ago, the speaker respected the men of Weaver and Co. that day he realised the men of Weaver and Co. were good, sound, and honest Trades Union- ists, and he thought they would continue to be. (Applause.) The branch secretary had told them they had been fortunate to squeeze a little more out of the employers. The ex- isting circbmstanoes under all conditions won id still exist. The speaker L;:d had a pleasant afternoon in one way for the first three meetings he attended Mr. Richards (a ¡ director) fought hard and did everything he could far the company, and he fought hard ¡ to 900 the men did not get more than he could help. To-day be did it in a gentle- manly way and the speaker was very pleaded with the meeting. Messrs. Jones. Richards, White, and tho representative of Messrs. Dyer and Co. assured the speaker there should be no trouble between the men and themselves, and the same good feeling as heretofore would prevail. (Applause.) None of those pre&em knew what the speaker had gone through that week he did not I think they had any reason to compla.in that they belonged to the Union, and that the offi- cials had not done their duty honestly, The Union had fought fairly and honestiy and they had got what other unions could not do — recognition. (Applause). The settlement was an honourable one. and the country would give them credit for carry- ing the fight on in an honourable way. He trusted even the Western Mail would give him the credit of doing the best he could for the men. (Applause). The men had fought one of the finest battles ever fought in the country, and the general secretary took credit for having done ins duty to the men. That night the bells were ringing the old year out—old condi- tions out and new conditions in. (Applause), Mr. H. Coombs said he was very glad d was all over, and they should feel "indebted to Mr. M. L. Jones for the way he had met the men. Mr. Jones had been very fair, and he (M r. Jones) got into a row with the company for giving what, he had done the day before. That day Mr. Jones made (he concessions on nis own responsibility. (Ap- plause). Obstinacy on the part of the dir- ectors had caused the strike the speaker had pleaded hard for what had been brought about. Mr. G. H. Curtis (president) congratu- lated the men on the way they had accepted the secretary's report and remarks.

A WAjSNINt.

"ONLY THREE WEEKS TO LIVE."

LIVED UNDER FOUR SOVEREIGNSI

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I'DIATH OF MR. DAVID WILLIAMS

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SWANSEA NEW MOTOR AMBULANCE

"MUST MAKE AN QJIDElt" 1

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ABERAVON BURGLARIES.j ,„r.TJ

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