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I STRIKE SETTLED. 1 SWANSEA FLOUR MEN'S VOTE. PLENARY POWERS TO | LEADERS. ( MASTERS' CONCESSIONS ACCEPTED. — The upshot of the second day s confer- ence on Tuesday between the masters and men's representatives concerned in the Swansea milling strike was that a com- promise was effected, the employers giving certain advances. The whole of the tariff was gone through, and Mr. Harry Williams promised to lay the same before the men. The latter met late on Tuesday afternoon and the terms were received with favour. The terms offered by the masters were viewed with satisfaction by Mr. H. Wil. liams, who, however, remarked: "You cant get everything you want in this world. AU the poorer paid men will receive advances. The only section who are not in receipt of any benefit is the hobblers, or the discharge men, who are the best paid, and who when at work receive 10s. and over per day. This section naturally ootrplain that they do not benefit, but it was not expected their oppo- sition would ma.r the arrangement. Another point advanced by some of the men is that they should leave work at five instead of half-past. Mr. Williams, how- ever, before the men's meeting on Wednee- day, was optimistic, and regaided the sett&e- ment as accomplished. A meeting of the men took place at the Bird-in-Hand Hotel on Wednesday rncrn- ing, when the terms provisionally arranged •v-H-e again placed before them. Mr. J. Miles presided. Mr. H. Williajns said the private moot- ing had been a long one. Men might have individual opinions, and possibly there might be a few men who realised they had not got all they wanted. Yet they had got to realise collectivism was the point of view and not individualism. The meu perhaps had not got all they wajit-ed, but they had got something, and that was better con- ditions, some shght advances, and more, mey nau proved to the world that tne agonal Laootirers L n,uu were members oi the aliiuaLeo societies 01 the country, and tney had done more than a bigger society uad done a. few montiis back, one tiling tliev had got that the railway ser- vauts, with then big numbers and funds had not got, and that was they had recog- nation, (--ippiause). Better conditions, too, lie millers men had got, and ne felt sure they had made a step in the right direction, lae members were young in the Lnion, and when the tune came tnat the men couid prove Weaver and Co., together with the directors, had told them something thatt. was untrue, they should again be on the warpath. TXere was a great deal to cno- sider in questions of that sort, and after a long discussion he had to meet Messrs. covers representatives a.t 2 o'clock. The! President would tell them that of all the I¡ battles they had fought a,nd the small ron- cessions they had got that was one of the finest battles that the National Labourers' Union ever fought. (Applause). Out. of evil came good. Strikes were evils—neoes- sary perhaps—and out of that strike he be- lieved gra.nd results would follow. To-day they had a powerful organisation behind them, ana he was honestly of opinion that within the next six months they would have such u.i organisation in the Bristol Channel that no other firm would have the impudence to tackle the National Labourers' Lilian. (Applan.oe). Three deputations had waited upon him to aewpt a section of Jabour within the Lilian, ;irid next Satirr- day night he was going to hold a meeting, and he knew he could take 600 men. After those he was quite prepared to think there v.ould be 6,000 before long. (Applause). Then instead of having 10,000 behind them in the Bristol Channel, together with the pluck the Swansea millmen had shown, they would have such an organisation that within a year or so no employer dare tackle. The millers had fought a grand fight; they had only been ont one week, and thev had won an admirable battle. Although" they had not all they wanted, their conditions were better, and if they continued for an- other twelve months he felt sure at the end of that time they would be in a position not LO JLznt, but to ask for and get still better conditions. (Applause). After a long dis- cussion that morning a resolution had been moved and adopted that plenary po" (le given the general secretary to go to Messrs. Weaver and make the best conditions pos- sible, and that the men were prepared to 1Cl< «P the officials of the union. (Ap- plause). Personally, the speaker was only human-although the Daily Pest" inti- mated rather he was inhuman-he thankei the" Daily Post" and the Press for the assistance they had given him. That morn- i:!g lie had seen a leading article in the "Daily Post" and it struck the speaker I very forcibly that it was part of his own opinions. (Applause). Letter writing was not the best way of settling disputes, for letters could be read almost any way. \Vh3n a U1: got up to talk he could put more force into the argument and In a different manner from what he dared to in a letter, because in the latter case there was always the fear that a word might occur that might raise a legal matter. And while he thanked the Press for the assistance, he thanked another brother in Cardiff for giving him information which had been of groat vahie. The fight had not been with the Swansea millers afone there were men :n Cardiff, Newport, and Bristol belonging to other societies who were keeping the speaker posted up with every move that was taking place, and the speaker knew something that would surprise even Messrs. Weaver and Co. It had been a grand fought battle, and although he reiterated they had not everything they desired, thev had come out of it with credit to them- selves, for after all it was the men's fight. (Aoplausc.) Let them remember. Harry Williams would not be with them always, and whoever followed, no matter what took I pjar-e. let them remember that fact eollec- lively, and with the feeling of brotherhood one to another. Apolaase.) Tn conclusion, he astced tnem to stick to the union after Harry Williams had gone. and said strike pay wo-.ild be paid to each man for a week, though thev c#nld have paid it for six IT c regretted the stopoage of a big industry, but he had Wn told the m-i had not had a week's holidav for a Ion<r time, -41 nd he did not know but that the men would go back to work with better feeling than in the past. (Apnlause.) It transpired that bv 195 Votes to 5 (against the men decided to give plenary pewcrs to the general secretary to settle. Spoken to after the meeting. Mr. Harrv Williams said he calculated, roughly, the men had secured 75 per cent, of what, they asked for 011 the men's showing. He fur- ther added that they would return to work on Thursday morning. The" Daily Po:t" exclusively announced —and definitdy-on Tuesday evening that the strike would be sett'ed on the follow- ing (hy. It was. THE RESUMED CONFERENCE. The resumed conference between masters' and men's representatives took place on Wednesday afternoon at the offices of Messrs. Weavers, when terms were ratified.

TERMS RATIFIED-

A WAjSNINt.

"ONLY THREE WEEKS TO LIVE."

LIVED UNDER FOUR SOVEREIGNSI

------.----W2LSH TINPLATE…

I'DIATH OF MR. DAVID WILLIAMS

---PASSENGERS' PERIL.

SWANSEA NEW MOTOR AMBULANCE

"MUST MAKE AN QJIDElt" 1

------------" GIVE A LIE A…

ABERAVON BURGLARIES.j ,„r.TJ

..-------—1--L— I ( I PIIUL…

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-...---_W.-SWANSEA MAGISTRATES.

-"——-"t LOCAL BILLS IN PARLIAMENT.

) SWANSEA CHILD FALLS FROM…

LLANDILO CONDUCTOR.

-.'.-.----------.-. COLLIERY…

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IIAVY DAMAGES AGAINST THE…

LLANDILO LIBRARIAN.

LATZ ATTORNEY-GENIRAL

I NEW VICAR OF ST. JOHN S-,…

SWANSEA OLD B22WJRY FOUNDIR.

"THE LAST CLAIM."