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LLANDOVERY. -

BURIED UNDIR FILL OF IART.

I ALARM AT A PANTOMIME.I

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SAID SHE HAD BEEN MARRIED…

SWANSEA RAILWAYMIN.II'

1\ , HOW MID-DEV©H WAS WON,I

_■I CRUSHED UNDIlt A FALL.

"MOST FIERY OF LIQUORS.".

PROGIISS OF TAIIFF ltEFOIIf.

-------DICK JONES FINED. lu

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MID-DEVON RIOTS,

__'t POST TALBOT RAILWAYMEN.I

- THAT OLD WINTIR COUGH.

LLANELLY ROYAL CHOIR AT SWANSEA.

- SWANSEA-STRSST IMPROVE-!…

INFANTILIS MOITALITY.

----._--1 AT THE BACK OF THE…

; IONE OF PURSER'S WATCHIS.…

GARNGOCH VICTIM S FUNERAL.…

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' 1 1 11 1 ■ uijtm H.I ■ m'…

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11 1 ■ uijtm H.I m' 'STAGE SHOW THI CHUHCH TH1 WAY. MR W. CO CITS* PIONEER WORK IN A THORNY FIELD. STAR SUNDAY SERVICE DRAWS AN IMMENSE THRONG. "Jupiter" writes No better proof of the need for such service as that being so faith- fully rendered to "the least of these" ny Mr. William Coutts, proprietor of the Star Jheatre, Swansea, could be afforded than the crowded condition of that house at Sunday evening's concert. Mr. Outts deserves, whether he gets it or no, the un- stinted applause of every right-minded Swansea citizen for his self-sacrificing and unremunerated efforts to influence for good the very kind who most need real help and practical sympathy. It's a pity, in the interest of religion, that the churches do not take up this very work. They have suitable buildings, beautiful organs, trained choirs, soloists, speakers, everything except recognition of their responsibilities in this direction. A pity for there is an atmosphere of the church, as there is an atmosphere of t-he play-house, and while neither are necessarily evil, the former is more adapted for serious, moral and spiritual impression. Tentatively, some Christian communities in Swansea are taking this up. the Central Hall people, for instance and have there not been organ recital,s in some churches, though unfortunately for the most part with the low object of adding to the funds? Meanwhile we must all be grateful to Mr. Coutts, the pioneer of the really interesting after-church Sunday service. Sunday was a. popular evening the old hymns, "All people," "Art thou weary?" "Abide with me," and the Glory Song were sung, a really magnificent series of picture? illustrating the life of "Mary. Queen of Scots" also bioscope stories, "A faithless friend," Pierrot's death," r.nd For a woman"; sake," were shown. Solos were rendered by Miss Blodwen Davies. whose rendition of Daddy was one of the fin- est, by Mr. Bowen Davie?, and little Miss Ediei lie Brunn, who performed in the theatre last week. GRAND THEATRE'S SUNDAY CONCERT. There should have been a much larger audience at Swansea Grand Theatre's SunJ day concert, the third of the present sea- son, in view of the excellence of the pro- gramme provided. Conductor Isaac Ed- wards and the Gwent Glee Party—a weil- balanced organisation—provided the back- bone, and gave a genuinely meritorious ren- dering of Parry 's Pilgrim's Chorus," Pro- theroe's "Thp Morning Stars." and the "Halleluiah Chorus." amongst other pieces. The soloists were numerous and highly cap- able. Miss Maggie Jenkins' rendition of Liddel's setting of ''Abide with me" earned warm applause and Miss Beatrice Morris was equally at ease in Mascheroni's melo- dious "For an Eternity." Mr. Luther Da- vies displayed a tenor of good quality in "The Star of Bethlehem" and "The Hea- venly Song." Mr. George Thomas, an effective baritone, and Messrs. Morgan and Evans were other contributors to a pro- gramme embracing over a dozen items. .fis; Maggie Jenkins accompanied, and next Sunday the G.V.A. Band will be the attraction.

HE SPOKI WELSfl*

SWANSEA BURGLARY. --

CAKSURWEN GRIEVANCE. -

--VOYLAftT COLLIZR'S DIATS…