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CFIUDBBN PLAYING WITH FIREI

SWANSEA APPOINTMENTS.

EVERY MAN

LLANGELER MISER.

SWANSEA ASYLUM QUESTION.

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IMAYOR AND THE CHAIR

MIt. SEVAN'S CRITICISMS,

TIRDONKIN ACCIDENT. !

THI FORBISN STKJEL BÃI DUMP

MISSING PASSENGERS.I

- LLANDILO FARMER INJURED.j

! NORBISTON YOUNG MIN'S CLUB

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WINTER FOOD.I

_._-----THE SWANSEA GAS TRAGEDY.

SWANSEA MASONRY

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CHEQUE #AiiDRID OVEB.

--- -!g THI SCHOOLS QUESTION…

SICK AND TIRID OUT.

-.-.-FORTHCOMING SWANSEA MARRIAGE.

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! UNITED KINGDOM BAND OF HOPE…

SWANSIA APPOINTMENTS.

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r BREACH OF PROMISE CASE

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r BREACH OF PROMISE CASE DMAS POWIS YOUNG LADY BSCEIVID. CARDIFF CMAETESINS CLERK TO PAY £12£.1. NEATH JURY ASSESS THE DAMAGES. At Neath Town Hall on Thursday, Mr. A. T. Williams., Under-Sheriff, sa.t with a jury to assess damages in a breach of promise ac- tion, the parties to the suit being Magdaiena Man-ai-et Hcnn, of D'inas Powis, single, and Robert Idris Holley, chartering clerk, Bon- vifetoiie, near Cardiff. Mt. Ivor Bowen (in- Sitnucted by Mr. Morgan Rees, Cardiff) ap- peared for" the plaintiff. and Mr. George David, Cardiff, representee tine defendant. Mr. Iiotr Bowen xtid plaintifi was a young lady over 30, and lived with her widowed mother. Defendant was engaged at the Bute Docks, and the p«a*ties had known each otber all tfceir lives. The engagement entered into 13 yeary ago, a.nd then on J u'lty lOt-Ii last, wiUtout lvarning, the defendant suddenly broke off the engagement. He wrote exptressirig regret that- changed circum- sta<noes compelled him to bre-ak off the c'n- gagement, but expi^esesed the hope that she would have a bright and happy future. The letter was signed "Very sinceraly yoitrs." Prooeeding. Mr. BowiØIl said he was going to ask the jury to awa:\i reasonable damages. This was a case in whkh he was sorry to say t'hc defendant bad a.ted very !>ad!iy. He had led her on, led her to believe that he would marry onlty to jilt Iwr ,wà to ruin her mfltrioiioniail pro>s^>eot>. Thus was the plaintiff forced to seek the remedy which the !a.w gives lJill. All t.his had gone on since 1895. a.nd the only reason defendant gave for his cruel conduct was altered circanistanoes. M-r. Bowen was about to read eorresipfxidejioe prior to tbe pmnjise in December, 1900, Irut Mr. Goorge David objected, stating tbat they were not adnussabie. The Under-Slieriff said he did not think they wece miiterial. Mt. Bowen, continuing, aaid a sum of money bad been offered by defendant, but it bad been refused. Such an act was conisurii- j mate coolness on the part erf the defendant. jj A furtlieir discussion took p-iaoc respect Jug j 5 the ackniseabilitv of certain letters, and The Under-Sheriff said tlkat if tiM>y bone J on the question of darsTstges thery wsre adr j' missabie, and I IMr. Bowen proceeded to read a letter hy the defendant on Becom-her 121 h, 1905. De- fenndant wixxto — "I am honestly sick of being tied dowm like this every Sundav. You know bow happy we shall he when we are together. Home seems tbe last and never- breaking link of happiness." Mr. Bowen said it wasn't so in this case. Mr. Bowen, continuing reading "Sundays are Eke ordinary business days. I am bappv in tbe knowledge that our love is as solid as a granite rock, and that gives me contentment, of mind.— ith fond, fond love, your darling boy, Idris. Ajnother letteir, continued M Bowen, oontaincd the following:- "Weli, my darling. I send low from your own darling boy. 1 am axiously looking forward to Thursday." On March 25th, 1904, defendant a.g.;in wrote:— "My own love, Lena; and again three days later he wrote stating that ibis great love was a part of his hfe, and that he would never get tired of it. But he got tired very soon, added Mr. Bowen. In a subsequent letter defendant gave his ideal of happiness. He wrote;- "Two people joined together of the same love and the same temperament; then real love is bestowed. With united love to ma and with love to YOU. darling.—Your own Bob." Proceeding, Mr: Bowen said that plaintiff had received a lot of other letters", which sue had not preserved.- But-there was .one, continued learned counsel, that bad a direct bearing upon the iina-wi* position of the defesndant. In Jauiiary. 1905, defendant wrote stating that he and another gentle- man W,(,.1"" going to start running a steam- boat; but prior to t-his. lie had written stat- m.g that through the death of one of the partners in the firm of Christie's, lik em- ployers, and the cessation of the firm, he would in future have to live on half tlte saary he ha.d formerly been in receipt of. In^thk latter communication defendant said: I have a good deal to bear more than you have. Positions now are not so easily snapped up. I am plaood in a disastrous position. As to deceiving you, you are en- tirely wTong." I Here learned counsel interpolate! —"]low on earth ho oouki say that is past mv com- prehension." But. proceeded Mr. Bowen, to be perfectly fair, defendant did lose his position at, Messrs. Christie's, but he got another position; and it was dear he had some money, because he had .really formed the project of starting a steamer. And this was in January—a month after he was engaged to Miss Henn. The project ccine to nothing, but it showed that defendant had money all tho same. Mr. Geo. David There is not the slight- est evidence that a penny of the defendant's money wae goiitg into the concern, Mr. Bowen: Anyhow, defendant wrote: "No doubt they will say "Lucky girl.' I can say the same 'Lucky boy. (Laughter). And he said in another communication that he was goin.g to give up the station waiks. He was going to drive every mc-rnin rr.. "So," added Mr. Bowen, "you can see that he was already a prosperous gentleman of the docks." Plaintiff, who was an attractive looking young lady, bore out her counsel's opening statement, and was in no way shaken in cross-exajnii nation. Defendant, told the court he broke off the engagement because his circumstances were so changed thai he could not keep a wife He had had no regular work since he had left Messrs. Cliristies. There was no other girl. Cross-examined by Mr. Bowen: You promised to be true to death?—-But tbe cir- cumstances have so changed. Mi-. Bowen: But you are not dead yet, you know. (Laughter.) You have said" so in your letters that you would be, vou know. And you haven't. Now did ;"00 fix a date for the marriage?—'No. You" saad that you would marry her in about 12 months?—No. I don't think she remembered all that I asid to her. You didn't care very much what you told this poor girl, did you?—No. Mr. Bowen 1 thougbt that. Defendant: 1 didn't mean that. Mr. Bowen Now what about this steam- ship project? You were going to pat some money into it?—No. I had none to do so. What do you think of your conduct? You said you would be true to death you said her love was like granite, and so on, and you have been keeping this girl on for 13 years?—No; tho engagement was in Dec., 1900. Re-examined His salary at Messrs. Chris- ties was £150 a year, for the last three years. Out of that he had to maintain his mother and to pay his doctor's bills, for he had been in very bad health. Mr. David, addressing the jury, said that the public were going to ba invited to sub- scribe to tlvs share capital of the steamer. Defendant was unable to keep his promise because his altered circumstances precluded his doing SQ. Tho jury awarded plaintiff JE120 damages.

FOG IN THE ENGLISH CHANNEL-

-_.-, LL\NELLY CORONER'S INDISPOSITION.

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..———————!-xe CHARGE OF THEFT…

——————————I I JIB. LLOYD-GEORGE…

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DEAr. OF A SWANSIA TltkDZS.MAN.

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LABOUR PAITY AND SOCIALISE

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FFORESTFACH CHILD'S SUDDEN…

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SWANSEA MASONRY