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THE RECENT SWANSEA CONTEST.

THERE IS NO SECRET.

GLOSSOP MURDERER REPRIEVED.

-.----------.--NAVY PENSIONER'S…

-- ---.---' MONSTER OF THE…

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SWANSEA FISHERMAN'S SAD CASE.

SWANSEA SCHOONER'S TERRIBLE…

———-—————-="*\ TWO BOTTLES…

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THROWN OFF A WAGON.

SWANSEA 'PHONES TilANAGER.

DR. BARNARDO'S HOME AT SWANSEA.I;

------------FERRULE IN HIS…

---.-----' FIVE YEARS' FRIENDSHIP.…

--------"--..--..-----"" BURGLARS…

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AMERICAN LABOUR PLOT. <

WHEN THE WERN FARM FOLK WENT…

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WHEN THE WERN FARM FOLK WENT TO CHAPEL. SINGULAR YSTRADGYNLAIS CHARGE OF BREAKING AND ENTERING. MR. VINES LEEDER AND SERGEANT •ARRilTT. At Ystradgynlais on Monday Benjamin Evans, collier, Ynis, was charged with breaking into the residence of Thomas Jones, Wern Farm, Ystradgynlais, with in tent to commit a felony. Mr. Molyneaux Thomas prosecuted, and Mr. Leeder, Swan- sea, defended. Mrs. Jones, Wern Farm, was first wit- ness. Mr. Leeder interposed that complainant didn't want to prosecute, and that t-hit wit- ness was giving evidence against her will. Sergeant Jarrett knew it was a case got up by the police. Sergt. Jarrett: No, I don't know, sir; you are misleading the &nèh! 11 Mr. Benthall I don't think Mr. Leeder should make a statement of that kind. I Mr. Leeder: I think I shall be able to prove it. Witness wanted to give her evidence in Welsh, and Sergt. Jarrett was about to act as interpreter. Mr. Leeder: Ob, no; I can't agree to the sergeant acting as interpreter. Sergt. Jarrett [grieved) 1 thought you had a better opinion of me than that. Mr. Leeder (cheerily) I don't doubt your ability as an interpreter. Mr." Williams, school attendance officer, volunteered to interpret. Complainant said she left the house at half-pa-st live on Sunday, February 25th, to go to chapel, leaving her daughter, who shortly followed. At a quarter to nine she returned, and looked for the Key above the door, but found it in a different place. Tn the latch was a note. Inside an ornament was broken, and on Monday she saw that the drawer, usually kept locked, had been forced. She was in the habit of keeping money in the book-case drawer, but had taken it to chapel. Piisont.r had been at their house many times. On the following Wednesday prisoner came there. She asked him, "What is the reason, Ben Evans, you have come up this morning?"' "Mr. Jarrett has been with me ycst.erday," replied pris- oner. "Do you doubt me. A itness re- plied somebody had been in the house. Wit- ness identified a screwdriver (produced), whi-h was kept in the kitchen. Mr Leeder Ben Evans works with your son at the same colliery.' WLtness Yes. Partners, aren't they?-For all I know. Have you always found defendant a re- spectable man?—Yes. You don't think yourself that he would be likdv to touch any money of yours?—1 can't say. Witness admitted nothing had oeen taken out oi the drawer.. Mary Ann Jones, daughter, gave ewactice. John Jones, son of complainant, repairer at Yiiiscedwyn Colliery, met defendant that evening, who said he had left a paper on the latch to tell him to come to work at midnight. He saw defendant also on Mon- d;\v. and informed him someone had broken into the house. "Weli, well there's a pity replied defendant. "You don't believe it was me?" Witness replied, "No." La- ter in the week, while at work, he said to defendant, "I guess it was you in the house. Defendant replied, "I can't help vour guessing it was me; I must be prose- cuted. Bv MT. Leed-ir They were great friends. Asked if he really thought defendant was in the house, witness replied, "I only guess." >ir. Leeder: Do you think if defendant had gone up there to take your money, that I he wouM .have been such a fool as to put a note on your door? Witness I wouldn't trust him. Sergt. Jarrett said on February 28ih he arrested deienda.nt, who replied, "I am free I did not break into the farm at all. Replying to Mr. Leeder, witness said the police saw prosecutor before he had time to give information. Did he instruct you to employ a solicitor? —No; he said there ought to be one. Did be go to a solicitor?—I don't know. You swear you don't know?—Certainly, I don't know, sir. Have you any document signed by Thos. Jones thai he wishes this case to proceed?— No. I put it to you, you've gone on with this c.ase because this man once gave evidence against the police?—No, sir; I don't bear any feeling of thai kind- The Clerk objected to this cross-examina- tion but Mr. Leeder retorted, "I'm en- titled to make it, and I shall do it." Mr. Thomas protested that unless Mr. Leeder was prepared to prove it he had no right to make such a suggestion. Clerk said that when informed of any offence it was absolutely the duty of the police to inquire into it. They must do their duty. Mr. Leeder All I say is, the police act very peculiarly up this Valley. Continuing his cross-examination, Mr. Leeder questioned the sergeant as to why he had not brought the damaged chest and I drawers down. The Clerk: I've been a magistrates' clerk for over twenty years, and I have never seen or heard of a chest of drawers produced in court before. (Laughter.) Mr. Leeder urged that the police, in their desire to show oR their detective ability, had gone beyond what was fair. The charge, he held, was one of the slenderest and silliest that had ever been brought for- ward The magistrates, came to the decision that the evidence was not sufficient to send to a jury, and dismissed the case.

RIFLE AND FRIENDLY CLUBS.

I 2WMFELIN WORKS ASSIZE CLAIM…

FUNERAL OF LATE MR. JOHN'…

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BIG BRISTOL BLAZE.

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THE LAST "JOURNEY."I

MARCH OUT OF THE "THIRDS."1

CANINE RAID.

H WOULDN'T BE WITHOUT IT«*

,J. BOGUS WIDOWER ARRESTED…

SWANSEA UNEMPLOYED.

THREE FAILURES.

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