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. COLLISION OFF LUNDY.

"ALL OVER IN THREE MINUTES."

STEAMER CAPTAIN'S STORY.j

SAFE WITH THEIR FAMILIES.

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!WALES OR WHITEHALL?i

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CRIME ABOARD A BARGE

j SHIPWRECKED CREW ON BOARD

----PUMPED A PINT OF WHISKEY…

■j YEAR OF REVOLUTION.

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GERMAN NEGOTIATIONS SUSPENDED.

NEATH COAL SYNDICATE.

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SWANSEA UNION ESTIMATES.

EX-CWMAVON CHEMIST.

SWANSEA GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL…

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SWANSEA GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL l ANNUAL DISTRIBUTION OF PRIZES I GRATIFYING SUCCESSES IN THE PAST YEAR. The annual distribution of prizes in con- nection with the Swansea High School for Girls took place on Friday afternoon at Llwyn-y-bryn, Walter-road, when an inter- esting address was delivered by Mr. W. H. Robinson, M.A., Science Inspector of the Central Welsh Board of Education. The conferring of the prizes was a task which 17,e was ably performed by Miss Gwilym Mor- gan, who was accompanied by her mother the Mayoress. A handsome bouquet was presented by little Miss Barbara Samuel to the Mayoress, and another choice bouquet was presented to Miss Benger by -ttle idiss Hilda Jones. The governors present in- cluded Miss Brock, Mrs. Rd. Martin, Mr and Mrs. Moy Evans, etc. There were also a number of parents of the pupils present. Miss Benger, headmistress, read the re- port ending 1905, which showed that the work done and the number of pupils in the school was satisfactory. A number of certi ficates and scholarships had been won, as shown by the appended list. She spoke of the high tone of the school and the sym- pathy that existed between the mistresses and the girls; their work was characterised by a conspicuous lack of friction. One nisp point fhe wished to drive home to the par- ents was the necessity of sufficient rest, in order to produce a good result in the work of the pupils. She thought the elder girls should have at least ten hours' sleep and the younger girls twelve hours. The pupils, all fresh and bright in their white dresses 11 and green ribbons, then received their prizes and certificates. PRIZES, SCHOLARSHIPS AND CERTI. FICATES. The Mayoress distributed the prizes to the following: — Form VI.—Cecile Bowen, open scho'ar- Sihip £ 50 a year for 3 years, Royal Holloway College, Egham; Hilda Jones, first prize, senior certificate Central Welsh Board, matriculation, University of Wales, half-fee scholarship; Gladys Hammond, second, honours certificate and honours certificate Central Welsh Board, full honours certificate, Royal Drawing Society; Mollie Wilkie, senior certificate Central Welsh Board, matriculation University of Wales and half fee scholarship; Phyllis Goldberg, senior certificate Centra.l Welsh Board, matricula- tion University of Walec, half-fee scholar- ship Annie Turpin, matriculation, London University Dorothy Ace, senior certificate Central Weish, matriculation University of Wales and half-fee scholarship; hgnes Davies, senior certificate Central WeLh and full fee scholarship. Form V.—Katie Fisher, first prize; Josie Thomas, second prize; Florence Evans, senior certificate i Cential Welsh; Phyllis Isaac; Bee Moy- Evans, senior certificate Central Welsh, asso- ciated R.A-M. and R.C.M. higher division* Nellie Evans, Elsie Evans, Winifred Ash- worth. Form Vb.—Katie Clement, first prize; Alice Black, second prize; Grace Stewart, Annie Clarke, Annie Hardy, Isabel Wakefield, Gwladys Gregory, Olwen Gee, Nellie Abraham, Grace Jenkins,. Li'lie Luke. Form IVa.—Evaline Davis,, first prize jJlodwen Morgan, second prize • LUa Hill, Maggie Phillips, Gwennie Jones, Florence Davies, Maria Gear, Dorothy Fors te. Valvive Terrill, Ethel Thomas, May Jenkins, Letty Hammond, Gwenllian Morris, Form lVb.—Doris Radford, first prize: Frieda Stephens, sceond prize; Gwenyth Moy-Evans, Irene Cook, Sarah Lewis, Nellie Brown, Elizabeth Howells, Hettie James Middle Form. —Sarah Harwin, first prize; Constance Jelley, second prize; Dorothy Knight, Maggie Demery, Gladys Samue1, Evelyn Poweil, Gwendoline Davies, Muriel Pank. Form Ilia.—Gladys Williams, fint prize; Lilia-n Davies, second prize; Gwen Johnston, Gladys Lyons, Dorothy Ja-nes, Mabel Owen. Form Illb.—Crissie Dav;es, first prÍ2Æ; Olive Lovering, second prize: May Barron Fanny Jones. Form II.—Nora Stephens, first prize Elsie Goldberg, second prize Stephanie Wills. Form I.—Kathleen Hodder, first prize; Doris Jones, second prize; Olive Richardson, Gwladys Griffin, Kathleen Morgan. Full-fee Scholarships.—Entrance Scholar- stops: Florence Beyn-on (Central Higher), Olive Stewart (Central Higher), Lilian Gimb- lett (Pentrepot-h), Ethel Wakefield (Terrace- road). Scholarships renewed :—Agnes jjaVie: Annie Clarke, Grace Stewart, Isabel Wakefield, Florence Davies, Evaline Davis, Dorothv ForsteT, Maxia Gear, Gwennie Jones. Valvive Terrill, May Jenkins, Eliza- beth Howells, Sarah Lewis, Sarah Harwia, 1 Constance Jelley, Florence Evans. Half 1 fee Scholarships:—Mollie Wilkie, Phyllis Goldberg, Dorothy Ace, Bee Moy-Evajis, 1 Josie Thomas, Alice Black, Nellie Abraham, Annie Hardy, Ethel Thomas, Ella Hill, < DOTi3 Radford, Gwenyth Moy-Evans, Frieda i Stephens. Irene Cook, Maggie Demery Dorothy Knight. Katie Fisher, Hilda. Jones, Phyllis Isaac. University of London matriculation oerti j fkate, Annie Turpin. University of Wales matriculation certificate, Dorothy Ace, Phyllis Goldberg, Hilda Jones, Mollie Wilkie. 1 Central Welsh Board, 1905, Honours cer- tificate Gladys Hammond. Senior erti ficate: Dorothy Ace. Agnes Davies, Florence Evans, Phyllis Goldberg, Hilda Jones, Bea i trice Moy-Evans, Josie Thomas, Mollie Wilkie. Junior certificate: Nellie Abraham, 1 Winifred Ashworth, Alice Black, Anni- t Clarke, Katie Clement, Elsie Evans, Nellie < Evans, Olwen Gee. Gladys Gregory, Annie < Hardy, Jrace Jenkins, Lillie Luke, Grax> t Stewart, Isabel Wakefield. I Mr. Robinson in his entertaining address, punctuated with anecdotes, stated that it was the first time for him to address the parents of the girls at the High School, al- though he had on several occasions address- ed the boys at the Grammar School, where he was able to refer them to the schools past for examples. In this case he would refer J them to the future; the school's traditions rested with those associated with it at the present moment. He agreed with the man- ager of the Carolff University that the par- ents should be associated with the working of the school, and thought parents' even- ings were beneficial. After a visit of in- spection to the Swansea High School he went away encouraged by the energy and enthusiasm displayed by Miss Benger and her staff in the educational welfare of her girls. This jGJr, for the first time in Wales, there are more girls than boys in the Intermediate Schools, which shows the keenness of the Welshman to give his daugh- ter a good education. He approved of the emancipation of giris in tha.t he thought they should enter any profession they had a lik- ing for. The scholastic profession espe- cially had been ennobled s nee they had brought into it their strenuousness and en- ergy, although he seemed to think there was sufficient scope for their abilities without their entering the political field. Sir Fred erick Treeves, in his contention that the present-day women were physical1 y and mentally healthier and stronger than for- merly, also stated that genius was an unde- sirable quality the necessary attributes are health, serviceable knowledge, and sym- pathy. In dealing with health, he endorsed Miss Benger's statement that the girls should have sufficient rest. With regard to serviceable knowledge, he did not think parents ought to send their children to an intermediate school and expect to be edu- cated in one or two years. In 1905 sixty- four pupils had left the school, and one-half of them had only been there an average of two years. He had noticed a great quicks ening of the national life in Wales, and he thought every girl should study the Welsh language, as they are recognised as having special linguistic iacuities. Mathematics and science he thought were a trifle over- indulged, and was considerably surprised that the'Swansea High School did not pos- sess a properly equipped laboratory. Do- mestic economy should rank high in the subjects taught our girls, and there is to-day a splendid opening for teachers of domestic subjects. His last point, that of sympathy, wK.oh is every woman's natural gift, hI) dwelt on, and was pleased to hear from Miss Benger vhot so much sympathy existed be- tween the mistress and child, as it surmount- ed many an obstacle and helped to make school life pleasant and happy. Miss Benger, in thanking Mr. Robinson for his address, also thanked the Mayoress a.nd her daughter for encouraging them with their presence, and the proceedings ter- minated with the singing of "God Save the King,"

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SWANSEA AND MUMBLES LINE AND…

I STABBED AT A CARNIVAL.

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--.------.;.;..:" LOCAL COMPANIES.

---_..-.... FIVE FAILURES.

MUMBLES DEBTOR AND HIS WIFE

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[No title]

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS. (

ONE OF THE UNEMPLOYED.

FOUGHT IN THE CIVIL WAR.