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"l1— SWANSEA COUNCIL'S ! WRIT.…

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IS SWANSEA'S SHORE GOING?\

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IS SWANSEA'S SHORE GOING? LOCAL SCIENTISTS' OPTIMISTIC OPINIONS. WHEN SWANSEA BAY WAS DRY LAND. The recent scare anent the danger of Swansea's seashore being washed away does nOí unduly alarm local scientists. Lectur- ing on sea erosion at the Royal Institution, on Monday, Mr. Morgan Jones, B.A., said that local erosion was not very active, and for his address he would have to turn to other parts of England, where it was caus- ing great anxiety. The ordinary bb and flow of tides caused very little trouble, but when currents set in there was a friction on the bed, and, even in the little bays round the Gower ooa.st, some erosion was [he result. WTind waves, however, were the chief agent of destruction; in some cases they had, by measurement, been shown to exercise a force of two or three tons on each square foot. The hardest rock must give way to I such force as that in the end. The Gower coast was undoubtedly lower than it had been since the chalk period, and the, caves in which prehistoric men lived were now on thejevel of the sea. There was no doubt that Swansea Bay was once dry land, and that too, speaking geologically, at a very late period. The sand hills were much reduced, and for the London and North-Western Railway it was becoming s serious matter. Mr. Jones spoke of the conditions on the east and south coasts, where at parts as much as a yaid was washed away every few years. This aspect was not very comforting to the audience, and the lecturer spoke then on the means of protection. This was just as bad, in Yorkshire, he said, defence walls had cost as much as £10 per lineal yard. There are, however, cheaper means. such as by groynes^ and Mr. Jones men- tioned that if Swansea wanted to prevent that expense being necessary t hey must stop things being removed from the shores, not- only sand and shingle, b'ufc even seaweed. (Applause.) (Applause.) An interesting addition to the lecture was made by Col. Morgan, whose few remarks on the local coast were much appreciated He differed from Mr. Jones as to the age WHEN SWANSEA BAY WAS DRY LAND, and thought they must at least go back to the ice age. The question was, had Swan- sea Bay gone down since historical times? He believed that one foot was the total depth ÜlA land had sunk since Roman times, and as for the erosion spoken so much of lately, be did not think it existed. (Hear, hear.)

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"l1— SWANSEA COUNCIL'S ! WRIT.…