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OUR FINEST COLONY. g T Interesting- Lecture by frir. W. L. Griffith. Canada's Possibilities as a National Granary. Had any person present, at Saturday night's ie.t-ure at the Swansea Free Library pre- viotLsly entertained doubts as to whether the glowing pictures of Canadian life and labour were not somewhat overdrawn, sneii doubts j must have been speedily set at rest- bv Mr. W. L. Griffith's convincing and fascinating word- picture of his "21 year's in Western Canada. Mr. Dd. Davies (Editor, "Daily Post") pre- sided, in the unavoidable absence of Sir J. T. ] D. Llewelyn. There was a crowded audience ( —in fact, more than the Lecture Hall could i seat. In introducing the lecturer as Canada's re- presentative in W ales, the Chairman humor- ously observed that Mr. Griffith lacked only one qualification for addressing them—he was a, Welshman, not from the South, but the North. However, to compensate for that, he was also a. good Canadian, and could tell them much that was interesting respecting ihe boundless possibilities of that immense country. Mr. Griffith, who was cordially received, said it was a, great pleasure for any Canadian to he in Swansea, for in no spot in t'Ie United Kingdom was the atmospheie more strongly -ed i changed with practical sympathy with Canada. On the occasion of tlie disastrous fire in Ottowa a year or two ago, Swansea. was one of the first towns to come 10 the re- lief of the suli'ercrs. A little while ago Sir John Llewelyn headed a movement, in which lie was strongly sunnorted by local residents, for the removal of a considerable number of Welsh settlers from Patagonia to Western Canada. So far a.s it had gone, the movement was a complete success, and gave a unique manifestation of fraternity. Sir John ^Llewelyn. Mr. W. Williams ("Maesygwernen), Mr. W. J. Rees. and Mr. Davies had ap- j ) parentiy become imbued with the highest re- garcl for everything Canadian, and had shown tncmselves to be true friends of that country, tie might be permitted to add before enter- ing upon the subject of the lecture, that there was at least, one Welsh Settlement in Wes- tern Canada, wnete Welsh is the predominat- mg language, and wheie religious services are carried on in the old mother tongue. (Ap- plause.) Proceeding to deal with the history of the dominion, Mr. Griffith remarked that in 1870 the north-west territory was known as the Great Lone Land, no vast was its ex tent-, and so little was it traversed. It was principally regarded as a fur-Dei ring country. and the great tracts of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Assinibora were chiefly the haunts of hardy white trappers and Indims. Later on through Lord Strathcona's i;<;atiov?, Fe) t Simpson was created a wheat supply centie. I and the work of developing t J¡, Dominion began in earnest, until now they could claim in all sincerity to be "Britain & granary," and the raisers of the finest wheat the world p/- duced. The Canadian Government, 1U en, couraging settlers, were not. entirely actuated by philanthropic motives. it Ni ..s t. uaiter d 1 business. They wanted men. i'od men, to come there, and avail themselves of the oiier of cheap land, and a new it < pe (if labour. Ihere appeared to be some miseon.-cption, some apprehension on the Score, f (.r'uiflt. Many people regarded Canada, f:irti.culailv the north-western territory, as a sort or Aret C. region, in which discomfort reigned supreme, Well, he had had ample experience of Mani- toba, and of South Wales winters, but—give him Manitoba There was Lord Strathcona; lie, had spent 61 winters in Canada, and they knew what he was now at 83 years of age. The lecturer here, parenthetically, took the audience into his confidence with the story of a woollen cap that failed, which the Chairman Iiiiii oil ilis lit,,t, visit to tlie minion, and the audience waxed merrv over the incident. He (the lecturer) had been often asked if the climate was healthy, and he would say in reply that it was the healthiest in the world. There was all entire absence of malaria, and consumption had no chance. Dr. Jas. Patterson, of the Chief Health Office, Manitoba, had testified, too. that rheumatism and asthma were rarities. The dry air the sunny atmosphere were antagonistic to all these maladies. From the 15th of December to the 15th of March was the coldest portion of the Canadian year, life was enjoyable and healthy. Of coarse, with that great town of Swansea they could not compare Manitoba in the way of amusements, but they had no lack of it, and truth compelled him to state that the bulk of that was in connection with the Church. Altitude affected climate as mtieh as latitude. The colder Avinds in Manitoba were tempered by what was termed the "Chi- nook,"—so called from the fact that it blew over. and from the direction of the territory ol the Chinook Indians. That wind melted the snows, and fertilised the land. Wheat was grown in a latitude of 60 to 62 degrees, and the finest, wiieat extant at that. The lecturer remarked that there was a premium on thrift in Canada, whereas elsewhere the more a man earned, the more he was taxed. Xo one had a. more free existence than the dtkr in Manitoba. Reverting to education, all the teachers were skilled and educational experts. In 1871. there were in Manitoba 817 scholars, and in 1883, 5,604, and at the pre- sent time 59.811, and one teacher to every 40 scholars. Lessons were non-sectarian "and national in character. Religious subjects were dealt with in bonis set apart for the purpose. (.Anplause.) With all their present hw'E' out- put. grain-raising in Canada wais only8in its infancy, and in time of war they wanted Great Britain to depend upon it for the bulk of their supplies. (Cheers.) He then carne to the Welsh settlers from Patagonia. He had re- cently visited them. and found them, thoroughly atisfied with their lot. They had christened their settlement at Saltcoats, Llew- elyn, out of compliment to Sir J. T. D. Llew- eInl. who had handed him (the lecturer) two Welsh ensigns for presentation to the Chubut immigrants. These ensigns they valued very U* l.L. 1 Jl ft' 1. r.r 4.1 l. iiigiuy. unci me enect vl tne preseUIUlllHl would be lasting. As iegarded law and order, the Canadians considered their North-west Mounted Police the finest body of men in t-xi.S- tence, and they were not far wrong. There was it sense of subservience to the law that compared favourably with any other country. An important point, said Mr. Griffith, was the uteadv influx of Americans into Canadian ter- litorv. At the present rate, by 1905. there would be a million of Cousin Jonathan's people living under the British flag. and no one ccnild over-estimate tlie fact, that this constituted the strongest factor in the main- tenance of the British flag in _North America. (Loud cheers.) Mr. D.Davies. in moving i( hearty vote of; thanks to the lecturer for his extremely able and entertaining lecture, said he b.lieved Canada, was producing, in a. physical sense, olle of the finest people on earth, and it was likely to be the first to solye the dark pro- blem. as there were no more sober folk thaii the Canadians. (Applause). Mr. Lleufer Thomas, in ■'•iid t ht people in this country did not realise the boundless possibilities of Canada. They talked a deal nowadays about education, vat what was chiefly required was ^clucatiou hi the geography of the British Kmpire. tn the dominion there was true diLIlitv of labour— work was the condition of success. He felt confideut that the next great drama of the I'-()i-ld would be played a(], in the interests of the ulli ,11 Jaek. (Ap- plause.) Mr. Griffith suitably responded.

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